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1/1 B RARY 

OF THE 
UNIVERSITY 
Of ILLINOIS 

c 
L & 9uH /«, 

1917/18-19^21 



■Vl/n UNIVERSITY OF 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
BULLETIN 



Volume XIII 



MARCH 1918 



Number 1 




Year Book for 1917-1918 



University of Southern California 
Year Book for 1917-1918 



UNIVERSITY OF 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

BULLETIN 

volume xiii MARCH 1918 number i 




YEAR BOOK FOR 1917-1918 

WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 

1918-1919 



Published Bi-monthly by the University 
Entered as Second Class Matter under Act of Congress, July 16, 1 
Los Angeles, California 



)tn/n -^-^A/ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

CALENDAR 6 

DIRECTORY 8 

THE UNIVERSITY: History and Government 9 

Officers of Administration 15 

The Faculty 16 

THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS: 

The Under Graduate Courses 32 

The Graduate Department 45 

Departments of Instruction 52 

Engineering 122 

General Information 138 

The Summer Session 155 

THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS: 

General Statement ..........158 

Departments of Instruction 175 

THE COLLEGE OF LAW: 

General Statement 204 

Departments of Instruction 210 

THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY: 

General Statement 221 

Departments of Instruction -. 234 

THE COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY: 

General Statement 254 

Departments of Instruction 257 

THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY: 

General Statement 267 

Departments of Instruction 269 

THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC 279 

THE COLLEGE OF ORATORY 286 

THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 291 

THE UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 297 

CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS.. 310 

INDEX 361 



Nov. 28 to 30 
December 18 . 



January 4 
February 6 
February 22 
May 30 . 
June 8 
June 12 . 



June 24 to Aug. 3 . 

September 9 to 11 . 

September 12 . . 

January 27 . . . 

February 3 . • 

Mar. 29 to Apr. 5 . 

June 4 to 10 . . 



CALENDAR 

Applying to all Colleges 
1918 

Thanksgiving Recess. 
Christmas Recess begins. 

1919 

Work resumed after Christmas Recess. 
Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
Washington's Birthday Recess. 
Memorial Day Recess. 
Baccalaureate Sunday. 
Commencement Day. 

College of Liberal Arts 
1918 

Summer Session. 

Registration for the First Semester. 

Instruction begins. 

1919 

Mid-year Examinations begin. 
Second Semester begins. * 
Spring Vacation. 
Final Examinations. 



June 17 to Sept. 7 
August 28 to 31 
September 3 

January 2 . - 
March 3 . . • 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 
1918 

Summer Session. 

Entrance and Special Examinations and Registration 

Instruction begins. 

1919 

Second Trimester begins. 
Third Trimester begins. 



June 10 to Aug. 9 
September 9 to 1 1 
September 12 . 

January 21 . . 

January 28 . . 

May 12 . . . 



College of Law 
1918 

Summer Session. 

Registration for the First Semester. 

Instruction begins, First Semester. 

1919 

Mid-year Examination and Registration 

Second Semester begins. 
•Instruction begins, Second Semester. 
Final Examinations begin. 



for tlif 



The University 



October 2 . 

October 3 

October 11 . 

May 12 . . 



October 7 . . 

January 16 . . 
January 20 . . 
Mar. 29 to Apr. 5 
May 19 . . . 



September 30 . 
October 3 . . 

February 3 . . 
Mar. 29 to Apr. 5 
May 29 . . . 



September 9 . . 
January 30 . . 

September 12 . 

January 27 . . . 
February 3 . . 
Mar. 29 to Apr. 5 
June 4-10 . . 

September 16 . 

January 27 
February 3 . . 
May 30 ... , 



College of Dentistry 
1918 

Opening Assembly. 

Registration and Instruction begin. 

Registration closes for the year. 

1919 

Freshman and Junior Examinations begin. 

College of Theology 
1918 

Registration begins, First Semester. 

1919 

Mid-year Examinations begin. 
■Second Semester begins. 
Spring Vacation. 
Final Examinations begin. 

College of Pharmacy 
1918 

Registration begins, First Semester. 
Instruction begins. 

1919 

Mid-year Examinations begin. 

Spring Vacation. 

Final Examinations begin. 

College of Music 
1918 

.Instruction begins, First Semester. 

1919 

Second Semester begins. 

College of Oratory 
1918 

Instruction begins. 

1919 

Mid-year Examinations begin. 
Second Semester begins. 
Spring Vacation. 
Final Examinations. 

College of Fine Arts 
1918 

Instruction begins, First Semester. 

1919 

Mid-year Examinations begin. 
Second Semester begins. 
Final Examinations begin. 



DIRECTORY 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Thirty-fifth Street and University Avenue. 

THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

516 East Washington Street. 

THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

Tajo Building, First Street and Broadway. 

THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 

Sixteenth and Los Angeles Streets. 

THE COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY 

Thirty-fifth Place and Hoover Street. 

THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

Thirty-fifth Street and University Avenue. 

THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

3201 S. Figueroa Street. 

THE COLLEGE OF ORATORY 

Thirty-fifth Street and University Avenue. 

THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 

201 North Avenue 66. 

THE UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 

Thirty-fifth Street and University Avenue. 

THE MARINE BIOLOGICAL STATION 

Venice, California. 



Information concerning any of the colleges, and yearbooks c°"tatmn, 
the courses of study, *tc, will be mailed upon application to the Regis 
trar of the University. 



THE UNIVERSITY 

HISTORICAL 

In response to a general feeling that the interests of Chris- 
tian education demanded the establishment of an institution 
of higher learning in Southern California, plans were early 
matured which resulted in the founding, in the City of Los 
Angeles, of the University of Southern California. On July 
29, in the year 1879, the original deed of trust, was executed 
by Ozro W. Childs, Isaias W. Hellman, and John G. Downey, 
donors, to A. M. Hough, J. P. Widney, E. F. Spence, M. M. 
Bovard, G. D. Compton, and R. M. Widney, as Trustees. On 
August 8 of the following year, 1880, the incorporation of 
the University was effected under the title, "The University 
of Southern California." . The name of the corporation has 
since been changed to "University of Southern California." 

The first Board of Directors consisted of eleven persons, 
namely: A. M. Hough, Charles Shelling, E. F. Spence, P. Y. 
Cool, S. C. Hubbell, E. S. Chase, P. M. Green, J. G. Downey, 
R. M. Widney, J. A. Van Anda, and F. S. Woodcock. These, 
together with the trustees and the original donors of the 
trust, may be fairly held to represent the founders of the 
University. The corporation as at present constituted con- 
sists of thirty Trustees. 

The Articles of Incorporation provide that the Trustees 
shall be elected by the Southern California Annual Confer- 
ence of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

The first building was erected on the present campus site 
in 1880, and on October 4 of the same year the institution was 
formally opened for the reception of students, and the work 
of instruction was begun. Men and women are admitted to 
all departments of the University on the same conditions. 
Although requiring no particular religious faith of its instruc- 
tors and students, the institution, in accordance with the fun- 
damental aim of its founders, stands for the effective promo- 
tion of Christian culture. 

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The government of the University is committed to a Board 
of thirty Trustees. This Board has the power to elect pro- 
fessors and other officers of instruction, to confer degrees, 
to manage the property of the University Corporation, and 
to determine the general policy of the institution. 



|0 University of Southern California 

The President has charge of the educational administration 
of the University and is chairman of the University Council. 
The principal administrative officers, other than the Presi- 
dent, are the Deans, who have immediate charge of the work 
of the several faculties. 

The University Council is a representative body, consist- 
ing of the President, and the Dean and the Secretary (or some 
other member of the faculty) of each of the several colleges. 
It is the duty of the Council to consider the courses offered 
by the several colleges with a view to increasing the effi- 
ciency and enlarging the range of University work, to en- 
courage original research, to adjust all questions involving 
more than one of the colleges, and to advise the President 
upon such matters as he may bring before it. 

ADVANTAGES OF LOCATION 

Los Angeles is the metropolis of Southern California. Its 
population of about 500,000 represents every State in the 
Union and many foreign lands. Its importance as a po- 
litical and metropolitan center gives the students of the Uni- 
versity unusual opportunities for observation and investiga- 
tion along many lines, both cultural and professional. 

The climate throughout the year is such that tourists from 
every quarter come to spend a part of the year, and many 
return to make this their permanent home. 

It is the greatest railroad center on the Pacific Coast, tour 
transcontinental lines are now complete. A network of elec- 
tric roads connects the city with the numerous beaches, 
mountain resorts, and outlying towns. These are reached by 
delightful journeys through orange groves and orchards of 
the semi-tropical fruits characteristic of this region. 

It is known as the Convention City of the West. Every 
year brings large bodies of people here for the discussion 
of every kind of public interest known to science, politics 
religion, and the humanities. These great conventions afford 
the student an excellent opportunity to study the subjects 
of their discussion; and the resident population of the city 
is sufficiently large to afford important advantages for the 
study of sociology and kindred subjects. 

The diverse viewpoints of the groups of students m the 
nine colleges make their association an important cultural 
factor in their lives. m . 

The University campus is in close proximity to Exposition 
Park, in which more than a million dollars have been recently 
expended in erecting and equipping buildings and beautifying 



The University 1 1 

the grounds. The State Building contains exhibits of the 
products, mineral and vegetable, of the various counties of the 
State. The Museum of History, Science and Art contains the 
valuable, collections of The Historical Society of Southern 
California, The Academy of Sciences, The Cooper Ornitho- 
logical Society, The Fine Arts League of Los Angeles, and 
numerous private collections. Because of their easy access, 
these collections afford special advantages to the students and 
faculties of the University. 

The fifty-five acres of the park athletic grounds are avail- 
able and afford ample facilities for all outdoor sports, making 
a valuable auxiliary to Bovard Field with its new Stadium 
seating over 8000. 

THE FORWARD MOVEMENT 

The constantly growing needs of the University during the 
last decade have been the object of solicitous thought on the 
part of the administration, that adequate plans might be 
formulated to meet them. 

The Board of Education of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church included the campaign of the University of Southern 
California as part of the great Forward Movement. The 
purpose was thus set to obtain an ample campus and to raise 
one million dollars for additional endowment. 

On March 30, 1917, the Board of Trustees announced that 
all the frontage on the west side of University avenue be- 
tween the present campus and Exposition Park had been 
secured. This fixes the status of the University as a city 
institution and assures an adequate campus in the present 
highly advantageous location. 



12 University of Southern California 

OFFICIAL BOARDS 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Term Expires in 1918 

JULIUS A. BROWN 2277 H°bart Blvd. 

GEORGE L. HAZZARD, A.M W w"'"\ f 

EZRA A. HEALY, A.M., D.D ; f 1 W. 36th St. 

GAIL B. JOHNSON Pac.fic Mutual Bldg. 

BISHOP ADNA W. LEONARD, LL.D San Francisco, Cal. 

S. P. MULFORD • 615 Van Nuys Bldg. 

WILLIAM D. STEPHENS - 1108 w - 27th St. 

FRANCIS Q. STORY Alhambra, Ca • 

STEPHEN TOWNSEND Lon 8 Beach - )? • 

ERNEST P. CLARK • Riverside, Cal. 

Term Expires in 1919 

WESLEY W. BECKETT, M.D - Pacific Mutual Bldg. 

GEORGE FINLEY BOVARD, A.M., D.D., LL.D University 

WILLIAM M. BOWEN, LL.D : ...Washington B dg. 

HENRY W. BRODBECK, D.D.S Van Nuys B dg. 

JOSEPH E. CARR -Los Angeles Investment Bldg. 

PRESCOTT F. COGSWELL..., ,- El Monte, Ca . 

B. C. COREY, A.M • - Tr °P 1C0 ' <? • 

JAMES ALLEN GEISSINGER, D.D Long Beach, Cal. 

ALFRED INWOOD, D.D 3418 S. Flow*; St. 

ALBERT J. WALLACE, LL.D Union Oil Bldg. 

Term Expires in 1920 

MERLE N. SMITH, D.D T^%1Z?££ 

GEORGE I. COCHRAN, A.M.,.LL. D : Pacific Mutual Bldg. 

WILLIAM F. CRONEMILLER --3956 Ingrahant St. 

JOHN B. GREEN, A.B., D.D 501 Exchange B dg. 

EDWARD P. JOHNSON - ■ f * Security Bldg. 

FRANCES M. LARKIN, PhD., D.D San Francisco Cal. 

CHARLES EDWARD LOCKE, D.D., LL.D 728 Berendo S . 

DON PORTER ^T'Tmdt 

A. E. POMEROY. A.M 700 Grant Bldg. 

FRANK G. H. STEVENS, A.B Pomona, Cal. 

Officers of the Board 

BISHOP ADNA W. LEONARD Viceipreslden't 

J. E. CARR Secretary 

A. E. POMEROY ••"V f T°Z 

GEORGE I. COCHRAN Treasurer and Financial Agent 

Note-Where no other city or town is mentioned, the address is under- 
stood to be Los Angeles. 



The University 1 3 

Executive Committee 

BISHOP ADNA W. LEONARD 

GEORGE 1. COCHRAN J. B. GREEN 

J. E. CARR E. A. HEALY 

GEORGE F. BOVARD ALBERT J. WALLACE 

W. M. BOWEN A. E. POMEROY 

JULIUS A. BROWN W. F. CRONEMILLER 

S. P. MULFORD CHARLES E. LOCKE 

BOARD OF CONTROL OF COLLEGE OF LAW 

GEORGE F. BOVARD, A.M., D.D., LL.D University 

GEORGE I. COCHRAN, A.M., LL.D Pacific Mutual Bldg. 

GAVIN W. CRAIG, LL.M Hall of Justice 

THOMAS W. ROBINSON, A.M Hall of Records 

FRANK M. PORTER, A.B., LL.M Tajo Bldg. 

CLAIRE S. TAPPAN.. 815 Black Bldg. 

JOHN B. GREEN, A.B., D.D 501 Exchange Bldg, 

WM. M. BOWEN, LL.D Washington Bldg, 

W. H. DAVIS Pacific Mutual Bldg. 

CHARLES S, MILLIGAN Tajo Bldg. 

ADVISORY COUNCIL, MARINE STATION 

GEORGE FINLEY BOVARD, A.M., D.D., LL.D University 

GEORGE I. COCHRAN, A.M., LL.D Pacific Mutual Bldg. 

EZRA A. HEALY, A.M., D.D 841 W. 36th St. 

ABBOTT KINNEY Venice, Cal. 

WALTER LINDLEY, M.D., LL.D 2007 S. Figueroa St. 

GENERAL M. H. SHERMAN Hotel Westminster 

ARTHUR B. BENTON ..114 N. Spring St. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES, COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 

CHARLES D. LOCKWOOD, A.B., M.D., F.A.C.S President 

GARRETT NEWKIRK, M.D Vice-President 

JAMES D. McCOY, D.D.S Secretary 

J WALTER GRAY, D.D.S .' Treasurer 

GEO. F. BOVARD, A.M., D.D., LL.D. 
CHARLES M. BENBROOK, D.D.S. CHAS. D. LOCKWOOD, D.D.S. 
D. CAVE, D.D.S. W. C. SMITH, D.D.S. 



14 University of Southern California 

CONFERENCE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Term Expires in 1918 
H S RYDER, C. M. CRIST, R. D. HOLLINGTON, R. J. TAYLOR, 
DR. C. S. STODDARD, W S ALLEN, M M. PARKER, E. P. 
CLARK. 

Term Expires in 1919 

CHARLES E. LOCKE, C. H. SCOTT, H. E. MURKETT, C. P. MET- 
CALF, EGERTON SHORE, A. M. DREW, C P. CLOCKE, 
WILBUR G. FISKE. 

Term Expires in 1920 
H W WHITE, C. H. M. SUTHERLAND, W. E. TILROE, C B. 
' DALTON, GEO. N. KING, C. 1. D. MOORE, W. L. FREW, 
A. J. VISEL. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION PRESIDENTS 

LIB M^An A nt T Rowland McCorkle 281 East Avenue 52 

MEDICINE: nd BuiMing 

Dr. Robert Dunsmoor 

DENTISTRY: pasadena Ca , 

S. H, Boeckman 

™A R TS: . . 206 South Avenue 55 

Stella Lambert 

LA ^ugh M. Wells • 318 Security Building 

MUSIC: „ a- - 3812 S. Vermont- 

Florence Benedict 

ORA I?| Y = . T . 5724 Hollywood Blvd. 

Ethel Rosin Tyroler Jf 

PHARMACY: 

Joseph Wright - 

THEOLOGY: Ca , 

Howard V. Clark 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
AND INSTRUCTION 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

GEORGE FINLEY BOVARD, A.M., D.D., LL.D. 

President. On the Gaylord Hartupee Endowment 
GEORGE I. COCHRAN, A.M., LL.D. 

Treasurer and Financial Agent 
JOHN HAROLD MONTGOMERY, M. S., E.E. 

Registrar. 
THOMAS BLANCHARD STOWELL, Ph.D., LL.D. 

Chairman of the Graduate Council 
CHARLES WILLIAM BRYSON, A.B., M.D. 

Dean of the College of Physicians and Surgeons. # 

FRANK MONROE PORTER, A.B., LL.M. 

Dean of the College of Law 
LEWIS EUGENE FORD, D.D.S. 

Dean of the College of Dentistry 
EZRA ANTHONY HEALY, A.M., S.T.D. 

Dean of the College of Theology 
LAIRD JOSEPH STABLER, M.S., Ph.C, Ss.D. 

Dean of the College of Pharmacy 
WALTER FISHER SKEELE, A.B. 

Dean of the College of Music 
WILLIAM LEES JUDSON 

Dean of the College of Fine Arts 
BEULAH WRIGHT, 

Dean of the College of Oratory 
ALBERT BRENNUS ULREY, A.M. 

Director of the Marine Biological Station 
HUGH CAREY WILLETT, A.M. 

Principal of the University High School 
MARYETTE G. MACKEY, A.M. 

Dean of Women, College of Liberal Arts 
STANLEY F. McCLUNG 

Assistant Treasurer 
MABEL E. RUSSELL, A.B. 

Assistant Registrar 
WARREN BRADLEY BOVARD, * 

Assistant Financial Agent 
ROBERT A. HONNER 

Acting Assistant Financial Agent 
CHARLOTTE MAUD BROWN, 

Librarian. 
DEAN CROMWELL, 

Director of Competitive Athletics. 
CHESTER HERBERT BOWERS, A.M., M.D. 

Medical Examiner of Men. 
ELSA HENRIETTA HORSTMANN, M.D. 

Medical Examiner of Women and Lecturer on Health and 

Development. 
CURTIS FERDINAND HUSE, 
Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



I 6 University of Southern California 

THE FACULTY 

PROFESSORS 

1227 S. Hoover 
CAROLINE ALCHIN 

Fl0ie T\1^TZ Y J, Auditorium Bldg. 

EDGAR M. ALLEN, M .D •■--■--»•; 

Assistant Professor of Obstetr.es. ^ 

DAVID C. ALLISON ^ 

Associate in Architecture. 

PAUL ARNOLD, Ph.M 1241 W ' * /U1 

Professor of Mathematics. 

E GORTON AVERY, A.B., M.D. * . 502 Brockman Bldg. 

Assistant Professor of Surgery. „ Ave 

LILLIAN J. BACKSTRAND 3102 S. Vermont Ave. 

Professor of Voice Culture. rr;<r,„>rna St 

"GILBERT ELLIS BAILEY, A.M., Ph.D 9728 F.gueroa St. 

Professor of Geology. **„*„* RlHir 

JOHN VINCENT BARROW, SB., M.D 515 Investment Bldg. 

Assistant Professor of Medicine. vi<n ,„ n , St 

CATHRINE VIRGINIA BEERS, A.M 3517 S. Figueroa St. 

Assistant Professor of Biology. g 

MYRTLE EMILY BILES, A.M - 229 W '. 31st St ' 

Associate Professor of German. wi iUide Ave 

KENNETH McLEOD B1SSELL, A.B 7248 Hillside Ave. 

Assistant Professor of French. ^ 

JAMES BLACKLEDGE A.M ^--r— -^ n 

Professor of Hebrew Language and Literature. 

JOHN H. BLUMENBERG, Phar. B 2230 W. 30th bt. 

' E uo^rZniT^ G l^vTA,U Ph. d maw. 4* St. 

PHILtoLLElAt'TD. * , ^ *■&*« "** 

Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

MARGARET GRAHAM BORTHWICK A.R 343 W. 33rd St. 

Professor of the German Language and Literature. 

ERNEST BRAUNTON ...---..-; ; 

Professor of Landscape Gardening. 

EMMA FRANCES BRIDGES 

Professor of Applied Arts. Hoover 

EARL MANSFIELD BRIGHT 3888 So ' HoOVe 

Professor of Viohncello. n nffl . n c t 

RTTTH WENTWORTH BROWN, A.M. ..... -- 2659 Romeo bt 

RU P^ofYsfor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

CHARLES C. BROWNING M.D * 60! Merntt Bldg. 

Professor of Diseases of the Chest. 
CHARLES WILLIAM BRYSON, ^ i _^^^-"W^B^klm g . 
Dean of the College of ^yskiansand Surgeons, and Professor 
nf Gvnecoloev, Abdominal and Clinical burgeiy. 

ARTHUR dSoNT BUSH, B.S., M.D. 3526 W. Slauson Ave. 

Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology. 



*On leave 



of absence while in military service, of the United States. 



The University 1 7 

KEMPER B. CAMPBELL, LL.M 810 California Bldg. 

Professor of Torts, Real Property. 

JOSEPHINE CHAMBERS, C.F.A 3980 Dalton Ave. 

Professor of Metal Work and Jewelry. 

HELEN HARRIS CHUTE 3200 S. Hoover St. 

Professor of Public School Music. 

EDNA AGNES COCKS, A.M 1167 W. 31st St. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education and Director of the 
Women's Gymnasium. 
HORATIO COGSWELL, A.M. 
Professor of Voice Culture. 

CLYDE COLLISON, A.B., Mus. Bac* 2211 W. Twenty-first St. 

Professor of Piano. 

GERTRUDE CCMSTOCK, Ph. B :... 680 S. Witmer St. 

Associate Professor of Interpretation. 

CLARENCE WESTGATE COOK, A.M., B.S. (in C.E.) 1.1 , 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 5932 Woodlawn Ave. 

GAVIN W. CRAIG, LL.M. (Judge of the Superior Court). ...Court House 
Professor of Elementary Law, Water Rights and Irrigation 
Law, Securities. 

CLARENCE HOLMES CRILEY, Ph. B., M.D 404 Auditorium Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

CLOYDE DUVAL DALZELL 2817 W. 7th St. 

Assistant Professor of Dramatics. 

ANSTRUTHER DAVIDSON, CM., M.B., M.D 419 S. Alvarado St. 

Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

C S. DELANO * 2610 W. Eighth St. 

Porfessor of Guitar and Mandolin. 

JAMES MAIN. DIXON, A.M., L.H.D., F.R.S.E 427 N. Ardmore Ave. 

Director of Oriental Studies and Professor of Literature. 

FRANK P. DOHERTY, LL.B.* ...Merchants' Nat. Bank Bldg. 

Professor of Damages. 

CLAUDE C DOUGLAS, A.M 930 W. 35th St. 

Professor of New Testament Greek. 

E. LESLIE EAMES, D.D.S Auditorium Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Prosthesis. 

DELLA TOTTCN EARLY, M.A 357 W. 51st St. 

Assistant Professor of History. 

JULIO ENDELMAN, D.D.S College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Professor of Special Pathology, Therapeutics and Materia Medica, 
and College Librarian. 

EDGAR MAXMILIAN von FINGERLIN, Ph. D Santa Monica 

Professor of the Italian and French Languages and Literatures. 

RALPH TYLER FLEWELLING, A.M., S.T.B., Ph. D 

Professor of Philosophy. 4529 Budlong Ave. 

CATHERINE LENNOX FORBES Van Nuys 

Professor of Piano. 

LEWIS E. FORD, D.D.S - Investment Bldg. 

Dean of the College of Dentistry and Professor of Clinical 
Dentistry. 

KATHERINE TORRANCE FORRESTER... 1021 W. 32d St. 

Professor of the Spanish Language and Literature. 

F. W. FRAHM, D.D.S .College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Professor of Prosthesis and Crown and Bridge Work. 

*On leave of absence while in military . service of the United States. 



18 University of Southern California 

ALLISON GAW, A.M., Ph. D 1259 W. 35th St. 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

LESLIE F. GAY, JR., A.M. t 2889 Ide11 St 

Associate Professor of History. 

LEWIS E. GILSON, A.B., Ph.C 3681 Third Ave. 

Assistant Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacognosy. 

RALPH T. GOODWIN, A.B., Ph. C 1125 W. 30th St. 

Assistant Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacognosy. 
ARTHUR STANLEY GRANGER, A.B., M.D 705-710 Brockman Bldg. 

Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
LEWIS A. GROFF 717 Trust & Savings Bldg. 

Professor of Mining Law and History of Jurisprudence. 
ARTHUR LEON GROVER, Ph.B., M.S., M.D 516 E. Washington St. 

Professor of Pathology, Bacteriology and Clinical Microscopy. 
PERCY V. HAMMON, LL.B 410 H. W. Hellman Bldg. 

Professor of Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure. 
BYRON C. HANNA, LL.B HOI Merchants' Nat. Bank Bldg. 

Professor of Public Corporations, California Codes. 
WAYNE P. HANSON, M.D 1001 Investment Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Anatomy (College of Dentistry.) 
EZRA A. HEALY, A.M., S.T.D - --855 W. 36th Street 

Dean of the Maclay College of Theology and Professor of 

Systematic Theology. 
HENRY HERBERT, M.D - 719-729 Hollingsworth Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis. 
JOHN GODFREY HILL, A.M., S.T.B., Ph. D 854 W. 35th Place 

Professor of Religious Education and Hazzard Professor of the 

English Bible and Philosophy. 
ERNEST J. HOPKINS 1329 W. 49th St. 

Professor of Journalism. 
FREDERICK W. HOUSER (Judge of the Superior Court) 

Professor of Private Corporations. Hall of Records 

HENRY W. HOWARD, M.D 800 Auditorium Bldg. 

Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
WALTER LESLIE HUGGINS, Ph.B., M.D. > . - --;••••••"--- 

Associate Professor of Surgery. 627 Consolidated Realty^ Bldg. 
ROCKWELL DENNIS HUNT, A.M., Ph. D 1128 W. 30th St. 

Professor of Economics. 
JOHN CURTIS IRWIN, A.B., M.D.* 515 Investment Bldg. 

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 
BURT W. JOHNSON — - Clairmont 

Professor of Sculpture. 
EDWARD DOUGLASS JONES, M.D 208 Consolidated Realty Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Therapeutics. 
A. HALDEN JONES, A.B., M.D Bradbury Bldg. 

Professor of Physics, Chemistry and Metallurgy. 
WILLIAM LEES JUDSON ........ 201 S Avenue 66 

Dean of the College of Fine Arts and Professor of Art and 

Design. 
GEORGE F. KENNGOTT, B.D., Ph.D 1016 Gramercy Place 

Associate Professor of Sociology. 
WILLIAM B. KERN, M.D .- --- ■• Norwalk 

Superintendent Norwalk State Hospital. Assistant Professor of 

Neurology and Psychiatry. 



*t" Deceased 

*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



The University 19 

WILLIAM H. KIGER, M.D Consolidated Realty Bldg. 

Assistant Professor of Proctology. 
BERTHA JOSEPHINE JACOBY-KIENLE, A.M 1088 W. 31st St. 

Associate Professor of German. 
TULLY CLEON KNCLES, A.M 1204 W. 31st St. 

Professor of History. 
FRANK JOSEPH KLINGBERG, A.M., Ph.D 3757 Dalton Ave. 

Professor of Modern European History. 
LEWIS M. KOEHLER, Colonel U. S. A 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 
J. J. KCZLOWSKI Blanchard Bldg. 

Professor of Clarinet. 
JOHN JOHNSON KYLE, B.S., M.D.* 702 Title Ins. Bldg. 

Professor of Otology, Laryngology and Rhinology. 

WILLIAM RALPH LAPORTE, A.M 925^ W. 35th Place 

Professor of Physical Education and Director of Men's Gym- 
nasium. 

A. C. LA TOUCHE, D.D.S College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Professor of Operative Dentistry, General and Dental Histology 

and Superintendent of the College. 
CHARLES WALTER LAWRENCE, B.S., C. E 659 N. Alexandria Ave. 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

FRANK JAMES LEAVITT, M.D 159 S. Western Ave. 

Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
CATHERINE LENNOX Van Nuys 

Professor of Piano. 
ETHEL LEONARD, B.S., M.D Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Professor of Bacteriology. 
ANDREW CREAMOR LIFE, A.M 1370 W. 36th Place 

Professor of Botany. 

CHARLES D. LOCKWOOD, A.B., M.D., F.A.C.S Pasadena 

Professor of Oral Surgery. 

GEORGE JESSE LUND, M.D 414-17 Auditorium Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Otology, Laryngology and Rhinology. 

HOWARD LESLIE LUNT, A.M 5300 Pasadena Ave. 

Associate Professor of Education. 

ARTHUR R. MAAS, Ph. C 1121 W. 51st Place 

Professor of Pharmacy and Materia Medica. 
GRANVILLE MacGOWAN, M.D., 527 W. 7th St. 

Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

MARYETTE G. MACKEY, A.M 677 Valencia St. 

Dean of Women, College of Liberal Arts, and Assistant Pro- 
fessor of the English Language and Literature. 

ARTHUR F. MAISCH, M.D.* 600 Auditorium Bldg. 

Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

ROY MALCOM, A.M., Ph.D 619 S. Carondelet 

Professor of Political Science. 

CHARLES C. MANGER, Ph.G., M.D 1106-07 Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Professor of Neurology, Neuro-Pathology and Psychiatry. 

OLIVER JONES MARSTON, A.M 1186 W. 31st St. 

Associate in Economics. 

FITCH C. E. MATTISON, M.D 

323 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Pasadena 
Professor of Clinical Surgery. 



*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



20 University of Southern California 

PAUL J. McCORMICK (Judge of the Superior Court) ....Hall of Records 

Professor of Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure. 
GEORGE WASHINGTON McCOY, A.M., M.D 636 Security Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 
JAMES D. McCOY, D.D.S —- Brockman Bldg. 

Professor of Orthodontia and Radiography, and Secretary of the 

Dental Faculty. 
JOHN R. McCOY, D.D.S • - Brockman Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Orthodontia. 
THOMAS JEFFERSON McCOY, M.D 636 Security Bldg. 

Professor of Ophthalmology. 

james s. Mcknight, ll.b.* 

Professor of Constitutional Law. 

VICTOR R. McLUCAS, A.B., LL.B................... 908 Security Bldg. 

Professor of Common Law Pleading, Wills, Research, Conflicts 
of Law. 

EDWIN R. McMATH, A.M , 817 W. 32nd Street 

Associate Professor of Education. 

LYLE GILLETT McNEILE 626 Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Professor of Obstetrics. 

CHAS. C. MONTGOMERY, A.B., LL.B ....... 908 Security Bldg. 

Professor of Equity Jurisprudence and Procedure, Federal 
Jurisdiction and Procedure, Jurisdiction and Judgments, Extra- 
ordinary and Provisional Remedies, Restraints of lrade. 

JOHN HAROLD MONTGOMERY, M.S., E.E 1319 W. 37th Place 

Registrar of the University and Professor of Physics and Elec- 
trical Engineering. 

VINCENT MORGAN, LL.B .--502 Exchange Bldg. 

Professor of Code Pleading, Law of Persons, Real Property II, 
Damages. 

W. R MOLONY, M.D •- Bradbury Bldg. 

Professor of Anatomy (College of Dentistry.) 

GARRETT NEWKIRK, M.D - Pasadena, Cal. 

Professor of Hygiene and Ethics. 

E. AVERY NEWTON, M.D '. Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

ARTHUR WICKES NYE, B.S., M.E : -843 S Ardmore Ave. 

Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering, and Director 
of the Laboratory. 

FESTUS EDWARD OWEN, A.M 621 W. 34th St. 

Professor of Psychology. 

P C H PAHL M D 1015 Baker-Detwiler Bldg. 

' Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery Fractures and Dis- 
locations and Chief of University Hospital and Clinic. 

EDGAR PALMER, D.D.S - - 922 S. Bonnie Brae St. 

Emeritus Dean, College of Dentistry. 

T T PARKER D D S , -.-•—' - Pasadena 

Assistant Professor of "Dental" Anatomy and Operative Technics. 

CHARLES E. PEMBERTON , 678 S. Burlington Ave. 

Professor of Violin, Harmony, Counterpoint, History and Musical 

ARTHUR^ PERRY --• 1042 W. 41st St. 

Professor of Violin. 
CHARLES EATON PHILLIPS, A.B., M.D ............527 W. Seventh St. 

Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

*On leave of absence while in military service of the Uriitfed States. 



The University 21 

FRANK M. PORTER, A.B., LL.M Tajo Bldg. 

Dean of the College of Law and Professor of Evidence, Bail- 
ments and Carriers, Personal Property and Sales. 

FRANCIS M. POTTENGER, A.M., M.D., LL.D 

1100-1 Title Insurance Bldg. 

Professor of Diseases of the Chest. 
J. WALTER REEVES, A.B., M.D Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Professor of Physiology and General Pathology. 
LEWIS D. REMINGTON, M.D.* Monrovia, Cal. 

Associate Professor of Diseases of the Chest. 
WILLIAM W. RICHARDSON, M.D.* 602 Brockman Bldg. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
LAWRENCE MELVILLE RIDDLE, A.M 919 S. Harvard 

Professor of the French Language and Literature. 
SAMUEL RITTENHOUSE, Ph.D 5752 Chesley Ave. 

Associate Professor of Zoology. 
MRS. NORMA ROCKHOLD ROBBINS Prince Rupert Apartments 

Professor of Voice Culture. 
JOSEF ROSENFOLD 4703 S. Vermont 

Professor of Violin. 
JAMES G. SCARBOROUGH, A.B 1225 Washington Bldg. 

Professor of Code Pleading. 
ROY EDWIN SCHULZ, A.B Alhambra 

Professor of the Spanish Language. 
ALFRED J. SCOTT, JR., M.D 1501 S. Figueroa St. 

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
M. PAULINE SCOTT, A.M 954 W. 36th St. 

Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature. 
JAMES HARVEY SEYMOUR, M.D 502 Brockman Bldg. 

Member of the Judicial Council and Professor of Surgery and 

Clinical Surgery. 
HARLAN SHOEMAKER, A.B., M.D 621 Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Surgery. 
LEON SHULMAN, M.D.* 845 S. Hill St. 

Assistant Professor of Diseases of the Chest. 
WALTER FISHER SKEELE, A.B 136 E. Avenue 55 

Dean of the College of Music and Professor of Piano and Pipe 

Organ. 
EVA MAE SMITH, A.B 1313 W. 8th St. 

Assistant Professor of Oratory. 
ALBERT SCILAND, M.D 527 W. Seventh St. 

Professor of Roentgenology. 
HENRY E. SOUTHWORTH, M.D 709-717 Wright & Callender Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Gynecology. • 

FREDERICK A. SPEIK, S.B., M.D 800 Auditorium Bldg. 

Professor of Medicine. 
MME. ANNA HESSE-SPROTTE 1003 S. Grand View 

Professor of Voice. 
LAIRD JOSEPH STABLER, M.S., Ph.C, Sc.D 1120 W. 30th St. 

Dean of the College of Pharmacy and Professor of Applied 

Chemistry and Metallurgy. 

BENJAMIN F. STELTER, A.M., Ph.D 1083 W. 35th St. 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

THOMAS BLANCHARD STOWELL, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D 

2702 Hobart Blvd. 

Chairman of the Graduate Council and Professor of Education. 



*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



22 University of Southern California 

CLAIR S. TAPPAAN, LL.B ». 815 Black Bldg. 

Professor of Contracts (including Quasi Contracts, Partner- 
ships, Agency, Guaranty and Suretyship), Bills and Notes. 

W. E. TILROE, B.D., D.D 1017 W. 34th St. 

Professor of Homiletics and Pastoral Theology. 

E. F. THOLEN, M.D., D.D.S Brockman Bldg. 

Acting Professor of Oral Surgery. 

DAVID D. THORNTON, M.D Wright and Callender Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Oral Surgery. 

C. ADELAIDE TROWBRIDGE Fowler Apts. 

Professor of Piano. 

E W. TUTTLE, LL.B 624 s - Spring St. 

Professor of Admiralty, History of Common Law. 

ALBERT BRENNUS ULREY, A. M .....1435 W. 23rd St. 

Professor of Biology and Director of the Marine Biological 
Station. 

A F. WAGNER, A.M., M.D ----902 Hall of Records 

' Professor of Physics, Chemistry and Metallurgy (College of 
Dentistry.) 

LEROY SAMUEL WEATHERBY, A.M., Ph. D 1299 W. 37th Drive 

Professor of Chemistry. 

ARTHUR CLASON WEATHERHEAD, A.M 1329 W. 59th St. 

Professor of Drawing. 

HUGH NEAL WELLS, LL.B ....... Security Bldg. 

Debating Coach and Professor of Debating and Public Speaking. 

WALTER F. WESSELS, M.D. 933 Title Insurance Bldg. 

Associate Professor of Medicine. 

HARRY OSCAR WHITE, M.D 516 E. Washington St. 

Professor of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology. 

HORACE L. WHITE, Ph. D -.516 E. Washington St, 

Professor of Biochemistry. 

ELIZA G. WILKINS, A.M., Ph.D.. 1116 W. 30th St. 

Professor of the Greek and Latin Languages and Literatures. 

GEORGE H. WILSON, D.D.S.. Cleveland, Ohio 

Special Professor of Clinical Prosthesis. 

J FAY WILSON, B.S., E.E 2096 W. 30th St. 

Associate Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering. 

HUGH CAREY WILLETT, A.M.* 921 W. 37th Place 

Principal of the University High School and Associate Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics. 

ORVILLE O. WITHERBEE, M.D 527 W. Seventh St. 

Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 

PAUL SPENCER WOOD, A.B 1052 Leighton Ave. 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

BEULAH WRIGHT - 344 S£ Andrews Place 

Dean of the College of Oratory and Professor of Dramatic Art 
and the Speaking Voice. 

THOMPSON B. WRIGHT, A.M., M D ..... .. _ 

Kinney-Kendall Bldg., Pasadena, Cal. 
Professor of Medicine. 

ELIZABETH YODER : -1313 W. 8th St. 

Associate Professor of Dramatic Art and Expression. 

WILLIAM LEANDER ZUILL, M.D 709-711 Wright & Callender Bldg. 

Professor of Otology, Laryngology and Rhinology. 



*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



The University 23 

VISITING AND EXCHANGE PROFESSORS 
SUMMER SESSION, 1916 

CAROLYN ALCHIN. 

Instructor in Music. (Author of "Applied Harmony.") 

RAYMOND MACDONALD ALDEN, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of English (Leland Stanford Junior University). 

RICHARD GAUSE BOONE, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Education (University of California 1 ). 

THOMAS NIXON CARVER, Ph.D., LL.D. 

David A. Wells, Professor of Political Economy (Harvard Uni- 
versity). 

CHARLES EDWARD CHAPMAN, A.M., Ph. D. 

Assistant Professor of California History (University of California). 
LEON DUPRIEZ, J.D. 

Professor of Law (University of Louvain). Special Lecturer (Har- 
vard University). 

GRACE M. FERNALD, Ph. D. 

Professor of Education (Los Angeles State Normal School ; Clinical 

Psychologist, State School for Girls at Whittier). 
K. S. INUI, A.B. 

Special Lecturer in Oriental History. (Occidental College). 
MAE I. KNIGHT. 

Instructor in Music (Long Beach Junior College). 
EDWARD BENJAMIN KREHBIEL, -A.B., Ph. D. 

Professor of History. (Leland Stanford Junior University). 
SINGLETON REYNOLDS MITCHELL, M.S. 

Instructor in Chemistry. (Redondo Beach High School.) 
i*ALPH SMITH MINOR, A.M., Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Physics. (Leland Stanford Junior University). 
ERNEST CARROLL MOORE, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D. 

Professor of Education. (Harvard University). 
PERHAM W. NAHL. 

Instructor in Freehand Drawing and Art Anatomy. (University of 

California). 

ALICE ROGERS. 

Supervisor of Music (Long Beach Public Schools). 
FRANZ SCHNEIDER, A.M., Ph.D. 

Instructor in German. (University of California). 
WILLIAM H. SNYDER, Ph. D. 

Principal and Instructor in General Science (Hollywood Junior 

Coillege). 

LECTURERS 

' W. S. ALLEN, A.B., B.D 927 Title Insurance Bldg. 

Lecturer in Conveyancing. 

OTTO BAMES, M.D , 1604 W. 39th St. 

Lecturer in Materia Medica. 

C. M. BENBROCK, D.D.S Auditorium Bldg. 

Lecturer in Dental Economics. 

THOMAS A. BERKEBILE, LL.M 1015 Hollingsworth Bldg. 

Lecturer in Civil Law, Logic and Comparative Constitutional Law. 



24 University of Southern California 

E. z. binz : 732 Ceres Ave - 

Lecturer in Drug Clerk Efficiency. 
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BLEDSOE, A.B. (Judge of the U.^ S 

District Court) .- 

Lecturer in Legal Ethics. 
WILLIAM M. BOWEN, LL.B 1225 Washington Bldg. 

Counsellor in Forensics. 
CHESTER HERBERT BOWERS, A.M., M.D. 3122/ 2 Vermont Ave. 

Lecturer in Pediatrics. 

BERT BOYD, D.D.S .- _ -- -^ ;■«»- Stor y Bldg - 

Lecturer in Ethics, General and Oral Hygiene. 

HARRY M. BRANDEL, M.D 1202 Brockman Bldg. 

Lecturer in Pediatrics. 

GEORGE WILEY BROOME, M.D , 62454 S. Alvarado St. 

Lecturer in Surgery. 

ARTHUR C. BROWN, A.B Glendale 

Lecturer in Education. 

TOHN MACKENZIE BROWN, M.D., F.A.C.S Brockman Bldg. 

Lecturer in Rhinology and Laryngology. 

T 1ST BRUNSWIG Brunswig Drug Co. 

Lecturer in Selected" Business Topics. (College of Pharmacy.) 

E W. CAMP, A.B., LL.B., - Santa Fe Ry., Kerckhoff Bldg. 

Lecturer in Interstate Commerce. 

INGLE CARPENTER, Ph.B., LL.B California Bldg. 

Lecturer in Dental Jurisprudence. 

ALBERT TUTTON CHARLTON, A.B., M.D.* Brockman Bldg. 

Lecturer in Surgery. . . 

FOSTER K. COLLINS, M.D - 508 Hollingsworth Bldg. 

Lecturer in Surgery. _ 

ALMA MAY COOK 1810 Avalon St " 

Lecturer in Art. . 

W. T. CRAIG, Ph.D 731 H W n8 Bldg ' 

Lecturer in Bankruptcy. t . . _ 

R. S. CUMMINGS, M.D Merchants National Bank Bldg. 

Lecturer in Internal Medicine. 

FRANK S. DAGGETT - Exposition Park 

Special Lecturer in Animal Distribution. 

WIRT BRADLEY DAKIN, M.D 403-4 L. A. Investment Bldg. 

Lecturer in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

W. R. DICKINSON Dickinson Drug Co. 

Lecturer in Economics in Pharmacy. 

REX DUNCAN, M.D -■ 638 Van Nuys Bldg. 

Lecturer in First Aid to the Injured. --'■«.* 

J. ENGENE FAHY, A.B., M.D - 206 W. Tenth M. 

Lecturer in Diseases of the Chest. 

THEODORE G. FINLEY, M.D -. 507 Brockman Bldg. 

Lecturer in Life Insurance Examination. 
JAMES A. GIBSON (Ex-Supreme Court Commi..toner »d S«pen<» 

Judge) - ■ - 

Lecturer in Appeals. . 

ARTHUR F. GODIN, M.D 800 Auditorium Bldg. 

Lecturer in Medicine. . 

F. L. A. GRAHAM, LL.B - 933 Higgms Bldg. 

Lecturer in Patents. 



*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



The University 25 

GEORGE L. GREER, A.B., LL.B 1012-14 Hibernian Bldg. 

Lecturer in Medical Jurisprudence. 

CARLOS S. HARDY, D.C.L 519 Trust & Savings Bldg. 

Lecturer in Fraternal Insurance, Medical Jurisprudence. 

WILLIAM HAZLETT, LL.B 601 Trust & Savings Bldg. 

Lecturer in International Law. 

JOHN HEDLEY ...Redondo Beach 

Lecturer in Missions. 

E. A. HENDERSON, A.B., Ph.G. University Pharmacy 

Lecturer in Pharmaceutical Latin. 
CHARLES W. HILL, Ph.G 326 S. San Pedro St. 

Lecturer in Industrial Chemicals. 
K. S. INUI, A.B. , 2308 W. Pico St. 

Lecturer in Japanese Sociology. 
JOHN E. KIENLE, A.M 1088 W. 31st St. 

Lecturer in Sociology. 
JOHN MARK LACEY, M.D , County Hospital, City 

Lecturer in Medicine. 
E. E. LEIGHTON 714-18 California Bldg. 

Lecturer in Pharmacal Jurisprudence. 
FRED E. LETTICE, M.D 1018 Brockman Bldg. 

Lecturer in Surgery. 
ERNEST J. LICKLEY 850 N. Mariposa Ave. 

Lecturer in Education. 
JEREMIAH B. LILLARD, A.M Gardena 

Lecturer in Education. 
FORBES LINDSAY 6767 Yucca St. 

Special Lecturer in Economics. 
WARREN E. LLOYD, M.L., Ph.D 906 Central Bldg. 

Lecturer in Philosophy of Law, Spanish and American Land and 

Mining Law. 
A. W. LUFKIN, D. D.S College of Dentistry 

Lecturer and Demonstrator. 
HARRY J. McCLEAN, A.B Long Beach 

Lecturer in Sociology and Elementary Law. 
OLGA McNEILE, M.D 626 Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Lecturer in Obstetrics. 
ERWIN H. MILLER, B. S 1051 W. 35th St. 

Lecturer in Food and Drug Adulterations. 
CHARLES E. MILLIKAN, LL. M.* 416 Tajo Bldg. 

Lecturer in Practice, Personal Property and Sales, and Consti- 
tutional Law. 
R. W. MONKMAN .^.Ninth and Broadway 

Lecturer in Buying as applied to Pharmacy. 
REXFORD NEWCOMB, B.S., A.M Long Beach 

Lecturer in History of Architecture. 
I. D. NOKES, D.D.S Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Lecturer in Comparative Anatomy and Odontography, Curator 

of the Dental College Museum. 
FRANK L. PLATT, D.D.S San Francisco 

Special Lecturer and Instructor in Local Anaesthesia. 
PETER C. REMONDINO, M.D Fifth and Beech Sts., San Diego, Cal. 

Lecturer in History of Medicine and Medical Bibliography. 
L. LORE RIGGIN, Ph.B., M.D 42 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 

Lecturer in Surgery. 



*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



26 University of Southern California 

C R W ROBINSON, LL.B i 406 International Bank Bldg. 

Lecturer in Acquisition of Title to Public Lands. 
T. W. ROBINSON, A.M County Law Library 

Lecturer in Statutory Interpretation. 
CARL ROSENBERG ------ --4 108 S. Brighton 

Lecturer in Salesmanship. (College of Pharmacy.) 
HERBERT AUGUSTUS ROSENKRANZ, A.B., M.D 1024 Story Bldg. 

Lecturer in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

L SCHIFF - 1337 S * H °P e St * 

Lecturer in Commercial Pharmacy. 
D C SCHLOTTE 292 ? Dorchester St. 

Lecturer in Biologicals. (College of Pharmacy.) 
ROY L SPENCER, D.D.S Merchants National Bank Bldg. 

Lecturer in Extractions and Anaesthesia, Senior Demonstrator 

of Extractions, 
NORMAN STERRY, LL.B Merchants Natl. Bank Bldg. 

Lecturer in Advocacy. 
ROBERT J. TAYLOR, A.M 4166 Normandie Ave. 

Lecturer in Missions and Comparative Religion. 
ROBERT J. TEALL, A.B - Gardena 

Lecturer in Education. 
EMORY W. THURSTON Leonard's Pharmacy 

Lecturer in Prescriptions. 
JULIUS ZIEGNER-URIBURU, Dr. Jur 922 California Bldg. 

Special Lecturer in Spanish- American Literature. 
C A. WAYNE Pacific Mutual Bldg. 

Lecturer in Economics. 
HUGH NEAL WELLS, LL.M.. 318 Security Bldg. 

Lecturer in Argumentation, Parliamentary Law. 
LUTHER E. WYMAN...: 3927 Wisconsin St. 

Special Lecturer in Animal Distribution. 
CHARLES STEPHEN YOUNG, M.D .627 Consolidated Realty Bldg. 

Lecturer in Surgery. 



INSTRUCTORS, ASSISTANTS, AND DEMONSTRATORS 

RUTH ADAMS ■ gardena 

Instructor in Piano. ■• 

EDGAR ALLEN, M.D Auditorium Bldg. 

Instructor in Obstetrics. 

H GALE ATWATER, D.D.S - : 610 Story Bldg. 

Special Instructor in Root Canal Technique. 

W. E. BAKER, M.D 603 L. A. Investment Bldg. 

Instructor in Medicine. _ 

C. PALMER BALLARD, D.D.S College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Demonstrator. 

WALTER A. BAYLEY, M.D 1216 W - 48th bt ' 

Instructor in Surgery. 

FRANK CROWELL BISHOP, M.D 1 106-7 Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Instructor in Medicine. 

A. A. BLATHERWICK, M.D 6100 Moneta Ave. 

Instructor in Obstetrics. 

E. RAY BROWNSON, D.O.S 218 Bradbury Bldg. 

Demonstrator (College of Dentistry). 



The University 27 

D. H. CALDER, M.D 752 N. Michigan Ave., Pasadena 

Instructor in Neurology. 
ESPERANZA CARRILLO, A.M 1817 Whilley Ave. 

Instructor in Spanish. 
RAY A. CARTER, M.A., M.D 2711 Central Ave. 

Instructor in Materia Medica. 

LOREN T. CLARK 822 N. Hobart Blvd. 

Instructor in Physics. 

MARIE S. CLARKE, 

Instructor in Advanced Art History. 

WILLIAM R. CLEVELAND, B.S 516 E. Washington St. 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

HARRY W. COFFIN, B.S., M.A 516 E. Washington St. 

Instructor in Pathology, Bacteriology and Clinical Microscopy. 

F. HARRY CRAM, D.D.S Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Demonstrator. 

R. S. CUMMINGS, M.D 1002 Brockman Bldg. 

Instructor in Medicine. 

EARL D. DAVIS, A.B ......1125 W. 30th St. 

Instructor in Economics. 

ROBERT VERNE DAY, M.D 527 W. Seventh St. 

Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

CHARLES W. DECKER, M.D 656 West Sixteenth St. 

Instructor in Surgery. 

MAXWELL M. DIXON, D.D.S Story Bldg. 

Demonstrator in Oral Prophylaxis and Pyorrhea Alveolaris. 
ALFRED J. DOWNS, M.D 713 O. T. Johnson Bldg. 

Instructor in Gynecology. 

ROBERT M. DUNSMOCR, M.D 1104-6 Garland Bldg. 

Instructor in Electrotherapy. 

HENRY W. EDWARDS, B.S., M.D Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Instructor in Surgery. 

AMEEN U. FAREED, M.D 335 N. Berendo St. 

Instructor in Medicine. 
F. B. FITCH, A. B 1711 W. 56th St. 

Instructor in Chemistry. 
MADELINE FOUCHAUX, 

Instructor in Art History. 
H. GALLAGHER, M.D 726 Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Instructor in Medicine. 
DOROTHY M. GARDINER 1314 Calumet 

Instructor in English. 

PLACIDA GARDNER, A.B., .M.D Normal Hill Center, Room 132 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

H. SCOTT GERITY, B.S 330 Consolidated Realty Bldg. 

Instructor in Architecture. 
ALMA GILCHRIST. 

Instructor in French. (College of Fine Arts.) 

WARREN D. GILL, D.D.S College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Operatory Manager. 

LEWIS E. G1LSON, A.B., Ph.G College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Assistant in Chemistry and Metallurgy. 
R. W. GILSON, College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Assistant in Chemistry and Metallurgy. 



*Cn leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



28 University of Southern California 

ROY W. HAMMACK, A.B., M.D.* L. A. County Hospital 

Hospital Pathologist and Autopsy Surgeon. 
OSCAR HAMMERCAS, 

Instructor in Still Life. 
ROSS ALLEN HARRIS, M.D 300-301 Broadway Central Bldg. 

Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
H. F. HAWKINS College of Dentistry Bldg/ 

Assistant in Bacteriology. 
L. A. HELLER, D.D.S College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Demonstrator. 
ROBERT B. HILL, M.D 1209 Brockman Bldg. 

Instructor in Medicine. 
LORENA BERNARDINE HILTY, 

Instructor in Art and Design. 
RUFUS ANDREW HOLT, JR., M.D California Hospital 

Instructor in Therapeutics. 
SIMON H. JESBERG, M.D 904 Investment Bldg. 

Instructor in Diseases of Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. 
CLARENCE A. JOHNSON, A.B., M.D 601 Merritt Bldg. 

Instructor in Medicine. 
D. DONALD JUDGE College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Director of Physiological Laboratory. 
LOUIS M. KANE, A.B., M.D 5503 Central Ave. 

Instructor in Medicine. 
MARION KAPPES .- 479 Ellis St., Pasadena 

Instructor in Dalcroze-Eurhythmics. 
EVA L. de KERPEZDRON 1025 W. 78th St. 

Instructor in French. 
WILLIAM B. KERN, M.D 837 Kingsley Drive 

Instructor in Psychiatry. 
H. C. KING, D.D.S - Consolidated Realty Bldg. 

Lecturer and Demonstrator in Porcelain Work. 
RICHMOND C. LANE, D.D.S Story Bldg. 

Assistant in Oral Surgery. 
MARIAN LEAVER, B.F.A 501 N. Soto St. 

Instructor in Art and Design. 
G. C LEISURE : - ---607 Haas Bldg. 

Assistant in Histology (College of Dentistry). 
WALTER E. LEONARD, B.S., M.D Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Assistant in Physiology. 
EDMUND W. LITTLEFIELD, M.D 709 Wright & Callender Bldg. 

Instructor in Gynecology. 
EDWARD D. LOVEJOY, M.D 1202 Brockman Bldg. 

Instructor in Dermatalogy. 
AUGUSTA LUBER, M. D 1002 Brockman Bldg. 

Assistant in Bacteriology. 
RICHARD C. MacCLOSKEY, B.S., M.D 926 Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Instructor in Diseases of the Chest. 
CLOYD HECK MARVIN, A.M.*.... 1076 ,W. 35th St. 

Instructor in Economics. 
JESSE RAY MILLER, A.B 3474 University Ave. 

Instructor in Journalism. 
DACOTAH MIZENER 101 N. Fremont St. 

Instructor in Piano. 



*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



The University 29 

H. L. MOFFATT, M.D 1018 Brockman Bldg. 

Demonstrator in Anatomy (College of Dentistry). 
DWIGHT S. MOORE, M.D 1106-7 Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Instructor in Medicine. 
WAYLAND A. MORRISON, A.B., M.D 321 Kerckhoff Bldg. 

Instructor in Surgery. 
BERT E. NALL, D.D.S College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Demonstrator. 
CHARLES F. NELSON, S.B., M.D 732 L. A. Investment Bldg. 

Instructor in Surgery. 

R. J, PACE, D.D.S Story Bldg. 

Demonstrator. 

G. E. PATRIC, M.D.* 821 Baker-Detwiler Bldg. 

Instructor in Diseases of the Chest. 

ISABELLE PATTERSON, 
Instructor in Mythology. 

ADRIAN B. PERKEY, M.D 917 Brockman Bldg. 

Instructor in Medicine. 

H. P. PETERSON, D.D.S College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Demonstrator. 

A. C. PRATHER, D.D.S College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Demonstrator. 

EDWIN F. RATHJEN, A.M., Ph.D 926 W. 35th St. 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

J. MARGARET ROBERTS, M.D 1229 W. 23rd St. 

Instructor in Diseases of the Chest. 

B. L. REESE, D.D.S College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Demonstrator. 

IOHANE F. SAKAIZAWA 1120 Georgia St. 

Instructor in the Japanese Language. 

CLIFFORD A. SMALLEY, M.D 505-506 Wright & Callender Bldg. 

Instructor in Medicine. 

H. W. SPIERS, M.D 519 Brockman Bldg. 

Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 

F. G. STALEY, D.D.S College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Demonstrator. 

J. A. STOCKER, D.D.S College of Dentistry Bldg. 

Lecturer and Demonstrator. 
J. W. STONE, M.D 601 Merritt Bldg. 

Instructor in Diseases of the Chest. 
BYRON POLK STOOKEY, A.B., M.D 625 Story Bldg. 

Instructor in Surgery. 
P. O. SUNDIN, M.D H. W. Hellman Bldg. 

Instructor in Obstetrics. 
FRANK GEORGE TAPNER, 

Instructor in Metal and Jewelry. 
LYMAN ELANSON THAYER, M.D 800 L. A. Investment Bldg, 

Instructor in Obstetrics. 
BEN THOMPSON, A.B., M.S., M.D 1221 Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

Instructor in Obstetrics. 
WELCOME A. TILROE, A.B 1017 W. 34th St. 

Instructor in Latin. 
AIME B. TITUS Athletic Club 

Instructor in Art and Design. 

*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



30 University of Southern California 

EDWARD J. VAN LIERE, M.A 516 E. Washington St. 

Instructor in Physiology. 

M. G. VARIAN, • ■ 

Prosector in Anatomy (College of Dentistry). 

EDITH L. VIRDEN 1674 W. 12th St. 

Instructor in Art. 
HALFORD A. WATSON, M.D Merritt Bldg. 

Instructor in Therapeutics. 
FRANK R. WEBB, M.D 516 E. Washington St. 

Instructor in and Demonstrator of Anatomy. 
AVA CLARISSA WELLS ,. .- Santa Ana 

Instructor in Art and Design. 
H. A. WHIPPLE, D.D.S Pasadena 

Demonstrator. 
HARRY H. WILSON, M.D 800 Auditorium Bldg. 

Instructor in Medicine. 
CLARENCE E. WORTH, D.D.S Consolidated Realty Bldg. 

Demonstrator of Porcelain Work. 

DOROTHY WHITE -- - 2408 S - H °P e St 

Instructor in Piano. 
GRACE WITHERELL, A.B * 1037 Heliotrope Drive 

Gymnasium Instructor. 



JUDGES OF THE PRACTICE COURT 



Department 1— Kemper B. Campbell, LL.M., Presiding Judge. 

Department 2— W. S. Allen, A.B. 

Department 3— Walter Bowers, LL.M. 

Department 4 — A. L. Bartlett, LL.B. 

Department 5— A. A. Kidder, Jr., LL.B. 

Department 6— R. W. Heffelfinger, LL.B. 

Department 7 — Ewald Selph, LL.B. 

Department 8— O. R. W. Robinson, LL.B. 

Department 9— C. L. Bagley, LL.B. 

Department JO— Hugh N. Wells, LL.M. 

Department 11— Ralph A. Chase, LL.B. 

Department 12— Thomas P. White, LL.B. 

Department 13— Richard J. O. Culver, LL.B. 

Department 14— J. M. Wright, LL.B. 

Department 15— E. K. Backus, LL.B. 



APPEALS 



Gavin W. Craig (Judge of the Superior Court, Los Angeles County). 
Frederick W. Houser (Judge of the Superior Court, Los Angeles County). 



The University 31 

OFFICE ASSISTANTS AND OTHERS 

HELEN L. ALFRED. 

Secretary to the President. 

MRS. IRENE ALLEN, 

Clerk, College of Dentistry. 

RUTH ESTHER BROWNE. 
Library Assistant. 

HENRY W. BRUCE. 

Assistant in the Office of the Treasurer. 
ALICE BURKS. 

Stenographer, College of Physicians and Surgeons. 
N. B. CONNEL. 

Clerk, College of Dentistry. 

MRS. A. EPPERSON. 

Clerk, College of Dentistry. 

LENA HEMBRE. 

Assistant to the Superintendent, College of Dentistry. 

DAISY RUTH HOLLINGSWORTH. 

Library Assistant. 

LOTTIE F. HOUGH. 

Assistant in the Office of the Registrar. 
ANNETTE F. HUNLEY. 

Assistant to the Dean, College of Law. 
HAROLD KIGGENS. 

Assistant in the Office, College of Law. 
GERTRUDE KIMBLEY. 

Librarian, College of Physicians and Surgeons. 
MRS. ELLA LAMPE. 

Clerk of Clinic, College of Physicians and Surgeons. 
MRS. A. B. LAUDER. 

Clerk, College of Dentistry. 

EDITH BERNICE LOVELAND. 

Library Assistant. 

AMY MARSH. 

Registrar and Secretary to the Dean, College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. 

PEARL ALICE MACLOSKEY. 

Secretary to the Dean, College of Music. 

m. Mcdonald. 

Clerk, College of Dentistry. 
GEORGIANA EMILY QUICK. 

Storekeeper, Department of Chemistry. 
VIRGINIA RAMSEY. 

Secretary, College of Fine Arts. 

CLIFFORD SCOTT. ) Q ; . v Ar n A 
SAMUEL STAGG. \ Secretaries, Y. M. C. A. 

EDNA SEDWEEK. 

Secretary, Y. W. C. A. 
MATHILDE OCTAVIE WACK. 

Library Assistant. 
MRS. A. M. WEST. 

Clerk, College of Dentistry. 
MRS. MARIE WILLIAMS. 

Assistant in Office, College of Oratory. 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

ORGANIZATION 

The College of Liberal Arts is organized into Undergrad- 
uate Departments and a Graduate Department. 

Four year .major courses, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, are offered in the following Undergraduate Depart- 
ments: Biology, Chemistry, Economics, Education, English, 
French, German, Greek, History, Journalism, Latin, Mathe- 
matics, Oriental Studies, Philosophy, Physics, Political 
Science, Psychology, Religious Education, Sociology and 
Spanish. . • 

Four year courses, leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Engineering, are offered in Ar6hitecture, Civil 
Engineering and Electrical Engineering. 

The Departments of Agriculture and Mining Engineering 
at present offer only the first two years of a four year course. 

Elective courses are also offered in the Departments of 
Art and Design, Drawing, Geology, Italian, Music, Oratory, 
and Physical Education. > 

The Graduate Department offers courses leading to the 
degree of Master of Arts in Biology, Chemistry, Economics, 
Education, English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, 
Mathematics, Oriental Subjects, Philosophy, Physics, Politi- 
cal Science, Psychology, Religious Education and Sociology. 
It also offers courses leading to the University Recommenda- 
tion for the High School Teacher's Certificate in Biology, 
Chemistry, Economics, Education, English, French, German, 
Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Physics, Spanish and 
Sociology. 

THE UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION 

There are three classes of admissions to the undergraduate 
courses: (a) admission to Freshman standing; (b) admission 
to advanced standing; and (c) admission as a special student. 

a. CANDIDATES FOR ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN 
STANDING must be at least sixteen years of age and must 
present evidence of good moral character. They must also 
give, either by certificate or by examination as hereafter 



The University 33 

described, evidence of preparation in fifteen units of prepara- 
tory subjects selected from the general list of subjects de- 
scribed on the following pages. For admission to the course 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts these fifteen units 
must be made up as follows: 

f n ?! ish 2 units* 

A Foreign Language 2 

Laboratory Science 2 

Algebra and Plane Geometry - 2 

United States History and Civics """1 1 

Electives ~ 

The laboratory science may be Botany, Zoology, Physiol- 
ogy, Physics, or Chemistry. 

For admission to the courses in 'Engineering the fifteen 
units must include the following: 

English 

A ,, , T 2 units 

A Modern Language 2 

Chemistry " 1 

Physics * j 

Elementary Algebra "" j 

Advanced Algebra 

Plane Geometry ■> 

Trigonometry and Solid Geometry ™"" "" \ 

United States History and Civics "".."".. 1 

Freehand Drawing -, 

Mechanical Drawing ■• 

Electives ? 

Complete List of Admission Subjects 

fn!: ^STSLSL^ 1 §32* U " ited States g 

p&^iJSSg ° { : 1 «™. f r entary --= ' 

Greet; & \ Sff/ ™*°nometry JZ~Z I* 

Fw2 "' £, dvanced 1, 2 Zoology . ' ! 

fSSi: JSZS37_jz r-2 SK&* :; -^:=""==: 

ISS: 5SSS2T =Y ^fe====±±= 1 

History Eng ' 1 K ys,cal Q G ?°8raphy ; 1 

History, Gre|ian--I„d'--Roma„Z;; F^and Rawing i/" J 

History, Medieval and Modern.. 1 Mechanical Drawing ~ZHZ~U' 1 

Vocational Subjects 1, 2: 3 

throi^Jlf «n» m "u ai f is ner ?"sed to denote a preparatory subject, studied 
through one school year with five class exercises (or the equivalent) per 



: / 2 



34 University of Southern California 

Admission by Certificate. The ^*^SriSf°J5fSS 
a ree-ular course in the University High School ot this urn 
versity or in an accredited high school, is admitted to the 
iMLL cla§s with-it examination, on presenting a cert.fi- 
rrewm nrincioal Unconditional credit is given 

^S?^2 e .SlSS; which the candidate is specifi- 

Ca The r FtcuHy en reserve S the right, however, to rehire an ex 

«= tK Hitftft&^SS 
^r To increase the probability of entrance without ex- 

from an accredited school are held in September. 

b CANDIDATES FOR ADMISSION WITH AD- 
VANCED STANDING are of two types: 

!. Students from other ; ^tions •^f^ s *Saf £ 'adtit/fd 
eluding Junior Colleges with well ^stabl.shea^ dee m .equitable 

to such standing and upon such terms ! as ,i catalogue of the institution 

Every such candidate is required to present a certified, of the subjects 
in which he has studied; a *^ h * a £S^' s there presented for entrance; 
he has there completed and of the suoje res erves the right to de- 

S*2,??SA5S^*fflS setter, the amount of credit that the 
^^udenSTronr^crredited Junior Colleges may receive tentative advance 
credit up to a maximum of €8 units. 

from 30 to 45 units. 

c CANDIDATES FOR ADMISSION AS SPECIAL 
STUDENTS must be persons of mature age who desire to 

^ti lying 8 h nS requirements for a regular course 
q WnHents come under the same regulations as regular 
^graduates, Td forfeit their privileges by failure to mam- 
tain a good standing. 

DESCRIPTION OF ADMISSION SUBJECTS 

,. English Grammar and Composition It is expected that ^he^cand^ 
S^^^^SS^ d sP X g n h and /ritte, As a result 



The College of Liberal Arts 35 

of classroom study of grammar and rhetoric, in addition to much practice 
he "nSr tiZVT*' J 6 !^ P re P?red to answer specific questions upon 
ous P D ?rt of t£ ntiaI ? ° f th f Se su ^ ect t such as the Nations of the vari- 
«£,-/■ . sentence to each other, the construction of individual 

ZZf m T7 a r e il lte ^ e u 0f reasonable difficulty, and those good usages of 
Se mn,f h ghS M Wl V Ch °^ e Sh0uld know in distinction from current frrors 
He must be able to write an essay developing a theme through several 
paragraphs free from marked deficiencies in spdlin g rpunctiSion sen 
tence-structure, and paragraphing, and indicative of ability to think con- 
studer-T^W E Sim ^™ h ^- A preliminary examination i given to "all 
FW^ a F° r r ? nTOlhng •* iem P^anently in the required course In 
Freshman English composition, and each student found deficient in such 

?rorib 0n or 1S bo r t e h qU1 fo ed t „-7 gis * r »:** Sub-Freshman EnS 'courses 
ia or lb, or both, for which no credit is given. In cases of mark^ A^ 

cUsTa^ any cir- 

Hnn 2 -, English T7 L l teratUr< ^ T1 ? e Standard maintained is that of the Na- 
indicated bdow '* E - amina tion Board. The division of units is as 

of thl ELEMENTARY ENGLISH LITERATURE.-Such a reading 
of the following works (or their equivalents), grouped as indicated as 

art^ic^rnit^A^n ^ ^ ^ intelligent/ rea'din/ a booW an 
artistic unit. At least two selections are to be made from each of the 
fo lowing five groups except as otherwise provided under Group 1. Each 

aa S hes°\ mU unit.T *' ^ °' WOrkS induded be ^ n ^ 

** W?V* Classics {n . translation. The "Old Testament," comprising 
at least the chief narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges 

ThT^n A mgS ''> ? nC U??? le1 ' t ?^ ther with the B °oks of Ruth and Esthef- 
The Odyssey ' (with the omission, if desired, of Books i, iii, iv, v, xv( xvi 
and vxn).— The "Iliad" (with the omission, if desired, of Books xi xiii 
xiv, xv, xvn -and . xxi).-The "Aeneid." (For any selection from this 
group a selection from any other group may be substituted.) 

Group 2. Shakespeare. "A Midsummer-Night's Dream."— "The Mer- 
chant of Venice."— "As You Like It." "Twelfth Night "—"The Tern 

"T^mi^ » J™ f V l T Cori r ol anus."— "Julius Caesar."— "Macbeth."— 
Hamlet. (The last three if not chosen for study under (b). 

Group 3. Prose Fiction. Malory's "Morte d'Arthur" (about 100 
pages).-Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress."-Swift's "Gullivers Travels" (the 
pOT C M^i *%&. t0 B /oMngnag) .-Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe, 5 

nv^°^ lths VlCa / 0f Wakefield. "-Frances Burney's "Evelina" 
~r"Z l SC i° ttS .^ 0VeI f;^7 An r of J ane Austen's novels.— Miss Edgeworth's 
Th lr ^ or "The Absentee."-Any of Dickens' novels -Any of 
Thackeray s novels.— Any of George Eliot's novels.-Mrs. Gaskel 's "Cran 
"Tfc" -r? l . n ? sle ys "Westw ard Ho!" or "Hereward, the Wake "-Readers 
»T™ C i° lster , an ^ the Hearth."-Blackmore's "Lorna Doone. "-Hughes' 
nl° ^? r ° W ^t, Sc il ool days. '-Stevenson's "Treasure Island" or "Kid- 
napped or "The Master of Ballantrae."— Any of Cooper's novels — Se- 

! ?,tetl] r °T m , P " e, ~^ th0rne ; S " The Hou * e of ** ^ Seven Gables" or 
Q W* ♦ • 7 al6S °. r Mosse s from an Old Manse."— A collection of 
short stories from various standard authors. ^necnon oi 

A* r r ° UP i' ti Ess , a y s > Biography, etc. Addison and Steele's "Sir Roger 
200 n7J ly / aP Q r , S ^ r sele r ct ions from the "Tatler" and "Spectator" (about 
Da«s^ g F«nwfnf C « A nS f l r .° m B °*™ 11 '* '.'^ of Johnson" (about 200 
CaleO or "T^ ?4 ^^^"Phy-"— Irving s "Sketch Book" (about 200 
pages) or The Life of Goldsmith."— Southey's "Life of Nelson "—I amh'* 
"Essays of Eli a" (about 100 pages). -Lockhart's "Life of Scott" (about 

son P an f SteTlI^^M^ S i ^S? H ™ sts " «^™ on Swift, Addi- 
son, and Steele).— Macaulay's "Essays" (any one of those on Lord Clive, 



36 University of Southern California 



Years Before the Mast. -^^""" a Gettysburg, the Last Public Ad- 
Speeches in Independence Hall and at J^ 1 ^ Memoir or estimate of 
dress, the letter to Horace Greeley and a f bnrt m „ Walden/ > Se- 

Lincoln).— Parkman's The Oregon Iran. , « Autocra t of the 

lected essays from Lowell Cafcout 150 t^ ^ f ,, and -Travels with a 
Breakfast Tabled—Stevenson s ^n Jnland voyag ( Sermons" 

Donkey/'-Huxley»8/*Autobiogra^ Education," and 

(including "Improving Natural Knowledge ^ DeQuin- 

k P &t! Sffifc&^rX^&vn * -"°« s standard 



cey. 

writers. 



Group 5. Poetry. Palgra^s "Colder ^ ea ^ 
« and III, with special attention to P/f^^j^' Book IV, with ape- 
Burns.-r-Palgrave's /'Golden ^Treasury ^%^™ S fa not ch osen for study 
cial attention to 'Wordsworth U Keats, and bheUey ^ ted Village.' - 

under (b). -Goldsmith's The Travel le n fa and Scottish 

Pope's "The Rape of the Lock. — A wnecuon o * hterburn » "King 
ballads (as the Robin Hood ballads The ■ ?£™ „ ^.^ g 

Estmere," ''Young Beichan,. Bewick an ,^;^anari, ^ c« K bla Khan." 

etc'-Coler^ Chmt* bd and^ 

—Byron's "Childe Harold, canto ^}°*„ ^'"Marmion."— Macaulay's 
Chillon."-Scott's ''The Lady of ^ e La f Na ° seby > -The Armada," and 
-Lays of Ancient Rome" The Battle o*^^ Lyn ette," "Lancelot 
"Ivry."— Tennyson s "The Princess or ^^Xings ''Cavalier Tunes," 
and Elaine." and "The Passing o f Arthur. Urow g^ ^ t 

-The Lost Leader," "How They Brought me u ° . from the S ea," 

Aix," "Home Thoughts ^om Abroad^ Home^inoug „ My 

(b) ADVANCED ENGLISH LIT ERATORE.-Sucb z ? study of the 
following works, grouped ^J^ form and suSu" upon the meanings 
swer questions upon *™ J Sions a s%n»y be necessary to an under- 
of such words phrases, and alius ion as .m y ^.^ qual t.es f 

standing of the works and an a PP^ c \ atl ™ thor > s life, other works, and 
style; and upon their ^*S|X» to to * made from each of the fol- 
literary environment. One selection i& 10 
lowing groups. (1 unit.) 

Drama. Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar."-"Macbeth. - 



Group 1 
"Hamlet." 



Group 2. Poetry. „ Milton's W^&£**?gg£? "TheHoly 
"Comas" or ^ycidas.' -Tennyson s ^^f^jj^ Lm Wordsworth 
gSi'^^Xfr^ iToT Palme's "Golden Treasury (First 
Series)." . „ 

Group 3. Oratory. Burke's I'Speech °n ConcUiation with America^ 

^ss^rJSss^ '"EiS-Bufkir ss »-.- 

(c) HISTORY OF ENGLISH "TERATURE^ W^ontto^of 

the history of English literature emphasizing ^ the salient { ^ 

^^oS^r^^lMifTooS anchors. (« unit.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 37 

simpler principles of syntax, the ability to translate easy prose at sight 
and the ability to write simple sentences in Latin. These attainments may 
be secured by the thorough mastery of an elementary text-book the read- 
ing of four books of Caesar's Gallic War, or an equivalent amount from 
selected authors including Caesar, and by exercises in written prose com- 
position. The examination in composition in 1917-1918 will be based on 
the second book of Caesar's Gallic War. (2 units.) 

4. Advanced Latin. To meet the requirements in Advanced Latin a 
student must be able to translate portions of Cicero's orations and Virgil's 
Aeneid, to show a familiarity with the principles of the Latin hexameter, 
and to translate a passage of connected English prose based on Cicero 
These attainments may be secured by the careful study of six of Cicero's 
orations and six books of the Aeneid, together with a thorough drill in 
oral and written composition. The examination in composition in 1917-1918 
will be based on the Third Oration Against Catiline. (2 units.) 

5. Greek. _ (a) Elementary Greek. A mastery of forms and the ele- 
mentary principles of syntax. Anabasis, Book I, Chap. 1-4. (1 unit ) 

(b) Second year's work. Anabasis, Books I-IV, or selections equiva- 
lent in amount. Prose composition based on the Anabasis, one exercise 
per week for a year. (1 unit.) 

(c) Third year's work. Homer's Iliad, Books I- VI. (1 unit.) 

m 7. German. A knowledge of the inflections of the articles, nouns, ad- 
jectives, pronouns weak verbs, and the usual strong verbs; familiarity 
with the use of the modal auxiliaries and the common prepositions, with 
the simpler uses of the subjunctive, and with the principles governing 
order of words ; and the ability to read and translate such stories and plays 
as btorms Immensee" and Benedix's "Der Prozess,' to translate easy 
(2 n unUs ) man ' t0 transla ' te at hearing, and to pronounce correctly. 

8. Advanced German Greater fluency in reading and translating Ger- 
man ; the ability to re-tell an episode or short story and to explain words 
and phrases in German ; familiarity with the uses of the subjunctive mode 
especially in indirect discourse, and with the formations of the passive 
voice and a general strengthening of the knowledge of grammatical forms, 
ihis knowledge may be attained by reading and translating from 500 to 
600 pages of German, with much viva voce practice in the form of ques- 
tions on the text and explanations in German. Two lessons a week should 
be devoted to prose composition and oral practice in grammar and vocab- 
ulary. (2 units.) 

?««?;♦• J 1 " 6 "? 1 * A kn °wledge of the essentials of grammar, including the 
,3»r £ S t n9 r nS -' adj ectives, P^nouns, and regular and common irreg- 
ular verbs ; familiarity with the use of the personal pronouns and with the 
elementary rules of syntax; and the ability to pronounce accurately, to 
Si r°M I' t0 t ^ nsl ^ te T modern stories and plays, such as About's "Le 
Roi des Montagnes" and Labiche and Martin's "Le Voyage de M Perri- 

into 11 ^rench ranS (2 at units h ) earing ^ ** '^ '' ^ t0 translate easy Wlish 

r J£ncA dVanCe ? + Fren ^ h ' A thorough knowledge of grammar. The 
work of t£?£Tl eenth CentUT L aUth0 I s of 50 ° to 700 P a, g es be yond the 
Tnce to ;d^« S Vi WO Jf! rS ' Ad ™ nced composition with particular refer- 
nary FrencT J units ) 7 Understand and to ex ? ress one 's *" in ordi- 

.«<i la . ? pa . nish - Th e essentials of Spanish Grammar. Reading from 
novels S^rnnf *?" 8 *P ani ? h c Tale ? for Beginners," and one <fr mor™ 
novels, bimple conversation in Spanish. (2 units.) 

12 Advanced Spanish. Careful reading of short stories and such 
Jimlnez 3 '' C^>'' " E1 Ca P^an VeneL," "Gil Bias,'' Ld -PepS 
Jimenez. Composition, grammar and conversation. (2 units.) 



38 University of Southern California 

13 Grecian and Roman History. Myers' - "Greek ^ and R^ .gj- 
S^l J^iSS-^^^aSSSS: ^ worHnfre- 
ports. (1 unit.) 

„ a^s&a -w° *^Js?? '"'• .-was 

Recitations and reference notebook work. (1 unit.) 

pA^ffi^Jva£i&J. SBC 3S? 8 

unit.) 

United ^tes^ ^^ and ^^ ( ^ umt } 



tations, 



books is desirable. 0/4 unit.) 

18. Elementary Algebra. . This .*»»« «^«de th« following sublets: 
The four fundamental operations ^^r^h ghest comUn fac?or > a "° 
in multiplication a " d . d " l ^ c >f Tna^actionaT 'equations ; simultaneous 
lowest common multiple, iTact }°*\?™\-.,, theorem for a positive integral 
3«t&K *Vheo| r^s-a-als; quadratic equ, 

equations. (1 unit.) 

19 . Advanced Algebra This q should include .the e .^^wm f ^subjects: 
Mathematical induction; the prod ! and ^^n of any root of algebraic 
factor theorems; volution, including, th * !?££? -the theory of exponents; 
polynomials, and ^o °f a n4m^c numb e "^ ti o„ s ; the theory of quad- 
complex numbers; radicals and ^rational equau< ^ > proportion 
ratio equations; simultaneous Quadratics ^ 3 's es; log rithms; per- 
and variation; arithmetic, geometric and harmonic series , ">g binQmial 
mutations and combinations )\J^^ d Jl^tl^^ies^Uition; the 
theorem for any exponent; i™*™*™ 1 * a *£ c f d V on the solution of equa- 
fSS^^SSSSSrJt^SS t°^rJ^ U and principles. (1 



unit.) 



20. Plane Geometry. This inclu ^sAe usual the o^^d £*!« ms 
unit.) 

(1 unit.) 

22. Chemistry. Lavatory »d ^ook work to ^ -Aoo^r 

such as outlined i""^ " to« t ™ k t Cghout the year of 
SaTrabor^yprtc't/cet required complete the amount of laboratory 
work desired. (1 unit.) 

23. Physics. The equivalent of °"Vf 'f itabol^wo^k'shoufd 
oratory and text-book work Accuratenote s of the y f^-^^ hart>s and 

^^^^S^^ *" am °" nt ° f t6Xt " 
book study required. (1 unit.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 39 

.„/?'■ «S 0t ??i A ^ Study ° f typ , es of pIant g rou P s > both in the laboratory 
and in the field. Drawings and notes made directly from the specimens 
must be submitted as evidence of the character of the work done A full 
year's work. (1 unit.) ' 

h,w?' f ool 9Sy- One year's work on the structure, relationship, and 
(1 unit) anim Laboratory notebooks with drawings will be required. 

26. Physiology. An equivalent of Martin's "Human Body, Shorter 
Course. (1 unit.) Ji 

^JJ\'.rJ^Z S } C l l G !°f aP . hy ; The Stuc ? y of one of the leadin S text-books, 
(1 SiStT Y exerclses in ^dividual laboratory work. 

28. Freehand Drawing. The study of light and shade and perspective, 
objects Wm (/ 2 a ?o 1 uniO ^ ^^ ^ ge ° metric and simple life 

work 9 ' 'leS niCal Drawing. The use of drawing instruments in line 
YZ« (v I g \ S eo ?™: trical Problems, simple projection and working draw- 
ings. (y z to 1 unit.) & 

.ripnHfi^f 61 " 31 ? c j ence ; ^ subject should be treated from the general 
scientific standpoint rather than from the standpoints of the several sub- 
fn™/' • ThG C °^ rse - Sh ° uld deal with the elementary princip le , involved 

^tlTZSoZ7tT unit.) sehold operations ' machinery * and vario - 

lowing: SOCial Sdence (1 unit) ' which ma y be made up from the fol- 

the ( de ) v e lnZ^ rC . ial , 1 f nd Industrial History. This subject should include 
world frnm?£ f * h f commercial and industrial activities of the western 
Sionld hf ?% ° f th t R ° man Empire to the P resent time - The course 

**^-?&^&^ ° f WeStem Eur ° Pe fr ° m the e <™ « 

countrie, E n°rn^i C c Geo f ****** This .course should comprise a study of 
of man ' & u „?t ) T ° UtCS in rdati ° n t0 lhe economi c interests 

™™- C) ? conoi ? ics - , A knowledge of the fundamental principles of eco- 

of nrnf 1 ^ 06 ' ^ dm ? ^ Sub J ects as the division of Ubor .the factors 

ttdf HL tT a S. d f SUpp1 ?' I aIue and P rices > and mternadona 
trade. A good text should form the basis of the course. {% unit.) 

(d) Sociology. A systematic study of the underlying features of social 
« s ' r th C ,° nStant referen ce to actual conditions kf contemporaneous 
society. A good recent text should be used, carefully selected readings as 
signed, and student exercises required. (^ unit.) SeleCted readln g s as " 

nVhr^ a „^° m ™ e M C£al La T* This course should include a study of the 

commercial P oTrsuTs S Th COrres P ondin S d ^ies and obligations of men in 

n^^^Tko^l^S^ and StatUt ! laW in ° rdinary busi - 

32. Vocational Subjects. One, two, or three units of well established 

SS?.£L«S? work in accredited high schools -y be e p~sM 

schotf'cTedit tl v C hl S J 1 st , ud f ents gfaduated from a recommended high 
scnool, credit may be allowed for such subjects, not designated in this li?t 

faculty re c£St d , ed "if th % Vtia & a a " d a PP~ved by the tWerlhy 
preset thdr nd „o^oo W ks° ^ SUbj6CtS in SdenCe »»* be <^« " 



40 University of Southern California 

THE UNDERGRADUATE ARTS COURSES 

The College offers regular undergraduate courses with ma- 
jor subjects as follows: Biology (Zoology or Botany), Chem- 
stry, Economics, Education, English, French German Greek, 
History, Journalism, Latin, Mathematics, Oriental Studies 
Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religious 
Education!' Sociology, and Spanish. Each of these course 
is designed to give a liberal education, extends through four 
vears and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
y Each course requires completion of one hundred and twenty 
units of college work, exclusive of the requirements in Physi 
£ 1 Education" In this connection a "unit" 
a week throughout a semester, each exercise to ^^ 
for the average student, one hour of recitation or lecture and 
two hours of preparation or of subsequent reading per week, 
5 an equivalent amount of work in laboratory course^ 

Lower Division courses are usually to be taken in tne 
Freshman and Sophomore years and Upper Division courses 
fn the Tunfor and Senior years. Sixteen units per semester 
for fhe Lower Division and fourteen for the Upper Division 

58 &££$A the Sophomore year every student 

SL m £mtjor e cl" e ^^StetJ.^ 

El^r £ advSSXt ti£ Licet mat as ^ 
after matriculation as possible, so that the entire work of the 
student may be properly planned. 

Requirements for Degree of Bachelor of Arts 
The following work must be completed in candidacy for 
' the degree of Bachelor of Arts: 

A The General College Requirements. To be completed 
by the end of the Sophomore year. 

■EVio-Hqh 1 One year; six units. 

2 One year; eight or ten units. The science may be 
A Physfes, Botany, or Zoology. 

Foreign Languages. ^^"VenTh ^Spani t oMTT' 

^u5^k^^^»«»k. th£ reqUirement ' S 
reduced to six units. 

Psychology. One year; six units. 

H story, Economics, or English Bible. Eight umts to be 
be taken in any two of these subjects. 

Physical Education. Two years; four units. 



The College of Liberal Arts 41 

Military^ Drill. Two years; four units. Required for all 
lower division men unless excused on account of physical 
disability. 

Red Cross Lectures. Two years; four units. Required for 
all lower division women. 

B. The requirements of the major department. 

C. A minor subject, approved by the major department. 

D. Elective courses, to be selected by the student with 
the advice of his major professor, sufficient to complete the 
required 120 units. 

E. It is also required that thirty-six of the units completed 
during the Junior and Senior years shall be in Upper Division 
courses. 

Options in the Professional Schools 

Law.— When 94 units, including all the general college re- 
quirements and a minimum of 24 units in the major depart- 
ment, have been completed in the College of Liberal Arts, 
and of these not less than 32 have been taken in the College 
of Liberal Arts of this University, the student may take the 
studies of the first year of the College of Law, and may 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts upon the satisfactory 
completion of two years in that college. Special consideration 
should be given to the following subjects: English (including 
Expression); Latin (at least two years if not covered by en- 
trance credits); History (English and American), with special 
reference to Institutional and Constitutional; Logic; Philos- 
ophy; Economics and Sociology; and Political Science. For 
a description of the recommended pre-legal course see under 
College of Law. 

Medicine. — When 94 units, including all the general college 
requirements and a minimum of 24 units in the major depart- 
ment, have been completed in the College of Liberal Arts, a 
student may take the first year in the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, and may receive the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts upon the satisfactory • completion of two years* work 
in that college. To this end the required subjects in the 
College of Liberal Arts are the same as those for the regular 
candidate for the degree of A.B., except that Biology should 
be the elected major and German or French the elected lan- 
guage (Latin being offered for entrance), and that in Science 
there is a requirement of one year each of Physics and 
Chemistry. 

Pre-medical Course 

Two years of work in the College of Liberal Arts or other 
approved institution are now required for entrance to the 



42 University) of Southern California 

College of Physicians and Surgeons. This must be preceded 
by a regular four-year High School course. There must be 
included two years each of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and 
French or German. Half of each of these subjects are nor- 
mally taken in the High School course. For detailed descrip- 
tion see College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

The Courses of Engineering 

The courses in the Department of Architecture, Civil Engi- 
neering, Electrical Engineering, Mining and Industrial Chem- 
istry, are more extensively technical than the Arts courses 
just described. The courses therefore differ from the fore- 
going in their regard to the general college requirements, in 
their greater rigidity of outline, and in the increased number 
of hours assigned to the work of the various years. These 
technical courses lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
For a description of the work, together with the full outlines 
of the required courses, see article's on Engineering Courses 
as indicated in the index. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students will be classed as Sophomores who have no en- 
trance conditions, and who have completed the first-year 
work in Physical Education and thirty-two semester units or 
work, including the first year of the General College Require- 
ments, as stated above. ' «■*'■'• j 

Students will be admitted to the Upper Division and classed 
as Juniors who have completed sixty-four semester units oi 
work in addition to the full requirements in Physical Educa- 
tion, and including all of the General College Requirements. 

Upper Division students will be classed as Seniors who have 
completed ninety-two semester units of work. 

Students in the Engineering Courses will be classified as 
Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors upon the basis of the com- 
pletion of at least nine-tenths of the work outlined for the 
various years. 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

On or before the appointed registration days in September 
and February, each student must register at the Registrar s 
office, and must have entered upon a study card the subjects 
desired for the semester. 

Lower division students may register for as many as 
eighteen units and upper division students for as many as 



The College of Liberal Arts 43 

sixteen units. Upon petition to the Credentials Committee 
special permission may in certain cases be granted to carry 
excess units. 

No student may change his registration without presenting 
his reason on official blanks to the Registrar and securing 
his approval. 

Students will not be given credit for work that is not re- 
corded in the Registrar's office. 

In the choice of subjects, all work necessary to remove 
conditions must be provided for first; and required subjects 
must take precedence of elective subjects. 

In order that students may have careful consideration in 
selecting the subjects to be taken, the Registrar's office is 
kept open throughout the year. Students are urged therefore 
to present their credentials and complete their registration 
prior to the appointed registration days. 

ATTENDANCE, EXAMINATION AND GRADES 

Attendance upon all class and laboratory exercises indicated 
upon the enrollment card is required. Absences are counted 
from the day on which instruction begins. All absences are 
reported to the office at the end of each semester. If the 
number of absences exceed one in a one-unit course, three in 
a two-unit course, five in a three-unit course, seven in a four- 
unit course, or nine in a five-unit course, the mark "Con."* 
will appear in place of a grade and can be removed only by 
special arrangements with the instructor. 

Regular examinations are held at the close of each semester 
in the studies that have been pursued in the different classes. 
At the end of the semester a report is issued by the office 
giving the student's standing in each subject for the semester. 

Scholarship Grades are indicated by letters, as follows: 

A, B, C, D, passing grades. 

Con. Conditional, work not up to passing grade. 

Inc. Incomplete, indicating that while the work 
done is of passing grade, certain portions re- 
main uncompleted. 

F. Failure. Credit can be given only upon repetition 
of the course. 

Grade points will be given as follows: A — 4 points, 
B — 3 points, C — 2 points, D — 1 point. 

If the student is reported "conditioned" or "incomplete," 
such delinquency must be made up in such manner as the 



44 University of Southern California 

instructor may determine, within one year from the date 
thereof. If the delinquency be not thus made up, the student 
may be required to take the subject again with a class, be- 
fore credit in said subject may be obtained. 

It is the effort of the faculty to so distribute grades as to 
approximate the "Biological laws"; thus it is expected that 
average achievement will be represented by a C grade. 

Probation. A student receiving F or Con., in one third 
or more of the work carried in any semester will be placed 
on probation upon registration. A second such failure while 
on probation will result in dismissal. While on probation 
the student may not take part in any intercollegiate contest 
nor represent the University in any public manner, either as 
an individual or as a member of. any organization. 

For special examinations a fee of two dollars is charged * 
Such are: 

1. Examinations for college entrance not taken at the 
regular times. 

2. Examinations for college credit on work for which 
special credentials can not be supplied. 

3 Examinations to make up mid-semester or final exami- 
nations, whether the delinquency is caused by failure to pass 
or by absence. 

GRADUATION 

Requirements. Upon the completion of one hundred and 
twenty-five units including all the general college require- 
ments as shown on page 40, the student may be granted 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts, provided, that at least 
one academic year shall have been spent in residence in this 
college and that at least 248 grade points have been received. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering will be 
given upon the completion of the required courses in Engi- 
neering, provided that at least one academic year shall have 
been spent in residence in this college and that a satisfactory 
standard of scholarship shall have been maintained. 



♦Instructors are authorized to give such examinations only on presenta- 
tion of the Treasurer's receipt for the fee in question. 



The College of Liberal Arts 45 

Graduation with Honors. — Students may be graduated 
cum laude or magna cum laude under rules established by the 
Scholarship Committee. 

Engineering students may be graduated "with distinction" 
under rules established by the Committee on Engineering. 

Under no circumstances will either of these honors be con- 
ferred upon a student who has spent less than two full years 
in this University. 

THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 
ORGANIZATION 

The graduate Department of the College of Liberal Arts 
of the University of Southern California was formally organ- 
ized during the year 1910-11. General oversight of the De- 
partment is intrusted to the Graduate Council, which is a 
. standing committee appointed from the faculty by the Presi- 
dent of the University. The administrative officers of the 
Graduate Council are Thomas B. Stowell, Chairman; Rock- 
well D. Hunt, Secretary, and J. H. Montgomery, Registrar, 
who may be called upon for information and advice. 

PURPOSE 

It is the purpose of the! Graduate Department: (1) To 
give due prominence to graduate courses of instruction offered 
by the University; (2) to insure systematic and efficient ad- 
ministration of this advanced work; (3) to provide separate 
instruction for graduate and upper division students. 

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 

The Graduate Council consists of the following members 
of the Faculty: 

GEORGE FINLEY BOVARD, D.D., LL.D., 

President of the University. 

THOMAS B. STOWELL, Ph.D., LL.D., Chairman. 

ROCKWELL D. HUNT, Ph.D., Secretary. 

J. H. MONTGOMERY, M.S., E.E., Registrar. 



46 University of Southern California 

PAUL ARNOLD, Ph.M. TULLY C. KNOLES, A.M. 

EMORY S. BOGARDUS, Ph.D. EDGAR M. McMATH, A.M. 

TAMES M. DIXON, L.H.D. JOHN G. HILL, Ph.D. • 

EDGAR VON FINGERLIN, Ph.D. ROY MALCOM, Ph.D. 

RALPH T. FLEWELLING, FESTUS E. OWEN, A.M. 

AM STB PhD SAMUEL RITTENHOUSE, Ph.D. 

ALLISON GAW, Ph.D. LAIRD J. STABLER, Ph.C, Sc.D. 

It is the function of the Graduate Council: (1) To define 
conditions of admission to the Graduate Department; (2) tc 
provide courses of graduate instruction, and to pass judg- 
ment upon the graduate courses offered by the respective 
departments, no one of which courses shall become opera- 
tive without the approval of the Council; (3) to pass upon 
the credentials of all candidates for graduate standing; (4) 
to establish and to maintain the requirements for all graduate 
degrees- (5) to formulate regulations for the effective organi- 
zation and administration of the Graduate Department. 

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

Admission to the Graduate Department of the College of 
Liberal Arts is granted to graduates of this College and to 
graduates of other colleges and scientific schools of recog- 
nized standing who present satisfactory evidence of character 
and qualifications. Other persons of suitable age and satis- 
factory attainment may be admitted to the advantages of the 
graduate courses upon approval by the Council. Admission 
to the courses of the Graduate Department does not neces- 
sarily imply admission to candidacy for a graduate degree. 

An undergraduate student who is within 24 units of the 
Bachelor's degree may be permitted, with the approval of 
the Graduate Council and the major professor, to take grad- 
uate courses, provided that he be not carrying more than 12 
units of undergraduate work. Such a student may register 
for only sufficient graduate work to bring the total number 
of units 7 carried to fifteen. In all such cases a student mus 
at the opening of the semester petition the Graduate Council 
for admission to the graduate courses he desires to- take. If 
such a student afterwards matriculates for the degree of 
Master of Arts, the graduate courses previously taken by him 
are entered as "already completed" in this curriculum^ 

The steps required for admission to the Graduate Depart- 
ment are: 1. Consultation with the Chairman of the Grad- 
uate Council; 2. Consultation with the head of *e departmen 
in which the student desires to do h,s major work, 3. Appear 
ance in person before the Graduate Council for such further 



The College of Liberal Arts 47 

interrogation as that body may deem advisable. At the time 
of making application the student should present his creden- 
tials, including (1) his baccalaureate diploma; (2) certified 
transcripts from the records of institutions previously at- 
tended, listing all his preceding courses with their unit-values 
and the grades attained in each course; and, in the case of 
applicants seeking a high school teacher's credential, (3) cer- 
tificates testifying to the quality of any previous teaching 
experience and the number of months during which such 
experience continued. Documents of the second and third 
classes above specified are retained by the University as mat- 
ters of permanent record. If they are not immediately at 
hand at the time of the applicant's seeking admission, regis- 
tration of the student is merely tentative, pending their 
presentation. 

DEPARTMENTS OF GRADUATE STUDY 

The University is at present offering graduate courses in 
the following subjects: 

Applied Mathematics (Engineering), Biology (animal), 
Biology (plant), Chemistry, Economics, Education, English, 
French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Orien- 
tal Studies, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychol- 
ogy, Religious Education and Sociology. 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS 

The attainment of the degree of Master of Arts (A.M.) 
depends upon the completion of a well-rounded and carefully 
organized undergraduate and graduate course, at the end of 
which the candidate shall offer proof of high and sound in- 
tellectual attainment in his major subject, together with 
maturity of thought and some breadth of view. Under no 
circumstances will the degree be conferred until the candidate 
has completed, beyond this University's requirements for the 
Bachelors' degree, twenty-six units of graduate work, in- 
clusive of the thesis; but the mere satisfaction of any time or 
course-unit requirement, taken by itself, confers upon the 
candidate no right to the degree, his achievement of it de- 
pending mainly upon his natural abilities and his stage of 
scholarly advancement. Undergraduate courses taken at 
other institutions are accepted at their full value so far as 
they conform to the standards of the various undergraduate 
departments of this University. Graduate courses from other 



48 University of Southern California 

institutions are similarly recognized, subject to the conditions 
of study "in residence" as hereafter prescribed. 

Each candidate for the degree of Master of Arts must be 
re-istered in the Graduate Department of the College of 
Liberal Arts not later than the first Tuesday in October pre- 
ceding his final A.M. examinations, and must pursue his 
course "in residence" for not less than one academic year. 
In this connection the term "in residence" is to be inter- 
preted as meaning that the student is taking not less than 
four graduate units per semester, with the proviso that, as a 
rule at least twelve of the units credited toward the attain- 
ment of the degree must be pursued at this University. For 
"residence" two summer sessions may be counted as equiva- 
lent to one semester. 

The candidate who has not previously done graduate work 
in this University will begin his registration by applying for 
admission to the Graduate Department by the method above 
indicated. He will then state the course of study which he 
wishes to pursue, which course must consist of a principal 
or "major" subject closely related to the major subject of 
his undergraduate course, and one or two subordinate or 
-minor" subjects satisfactorily related to the major subject 
and requiring not more than one-half the time given to it. 
The details of his course in this University will be determined 
upon consultation with the head of the department in which 
he wishes to major; and no subjects or units lacking the 
approval of the departmental head will be credited toward 

the desrree • e 

A part of the course will consist of the completion of a 
thesis or dissertation embodying the results of an investi- 
gation on some subject in the major department. It is not 
fhe intention of the Graduate Council that this shall be a 
piece of highly recondite research such as would befit candi- 
aacy for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy; but : ,t m ust 
be a serious, considerable, and printable piece of work demon- 
strating the writer's power of original thought, J« thorough 
grasp of the subject matter involved, and his ability to pre- 
sent his material in a scholarly manner and style. The title 

«Att.„timi U called to the fact that in connection with the College of 
J^tt h£t p^JtZSJ^J"^ « snt 

standard. 



The College of Liberal Arts 49 

of this essay must be presented for approval by the Graduate 
Council not later than six months before the month in which 
the degree is sought; a fairly complete bibliography must 
be similarly presented a month later; and the completed 
thesis, conforming in detail to the printed regulations fur- 
nished by the University, must be submitted to the Graduate 
Council six weeks before the conferring of the degree. In 
the case of those who are candidates for the conferring of 
the degree in June, these ultimate dates will be the first of 
December, the first of January, and the last Saturday in April. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER'S CERTIFICATE 

The law provides that the State Board of Education shall 
prescribe general rules under which county boards and city 
and county boards of education may grant regular certifi- 
cates of high school grade. These rules, together with the 
requirements of the University of Southern California, under 
which recommendation for such certificates are made, are 
summarized below. 

Group 1— Standard Group 

1. Bachelor's degree from a standard college requiring 
not less than eight years of high school and college training. 

2. One year (twenty-six units) of graduate work which 
must include one full year's course in at least one subject 
(major subject) in which recommendation is sought. 

3. The satisfaction of the departmental requirements. 

4. Fifteen units in Education, which may be completed in 
either undergraduate or graduate standing, or the two com- 
bined. These courses must include: 

(a) School Management, 2 units. 

lb) Secondary Education, 2 units. 

(c) Practice Teaching, 4 units. 

(d) Teacher's Course in major subject, 2 or 3 units. 

(e) Electives, 5 or 4 units. 

Group 2— Normal Graduate Group 

Must be graduate of a California State Normal School or 
other accepted Normal school. 

1. Bachelor's degree as in Group 1. 

2. One-half year (fourteen units) of graduate work. 

3. Departmental requirements, as in Group 1. 



50 University of Southern California 

4. Five units in Education, which must include. 

(a) Secondary Education, 2 units. 

(b) Teacher's Course in major subject, 3 units. 

Group 3— Experienced! Teachers Group 

A. Candidate having taught not less than one year (eight 
months) with success in any elementary or secondary school. 

1. Bachelor's degree as in Group 1. 

2. One year of graduate work, as in Group 1. 

3. Departmental requirements, as in Group 1. 

4. Eleven units in Education, which must include. 

(a) Secondary Education, 2 units. 

(b) Teacher's Course in major subject, 2 or 3 units. 

(c) Electives, 7 or 6 units. 

B. Candidates who have taught or been engaged in school 
supervision for not less than twenty months. 

1. Bachelor's degree as in Group 1. 

2. One-half year of graduate work, as in Group 2. 

3. Departmental requirements, as in Group 1. 

Group 4— Special Normal Course Group 

Candidates who desire to spend one-half year at the Uni- 
versity and complete their work at a State Normal School 
offering a special course for college graduates. 

1. Bachelor's degree as in Group 1. 

2. One-half year of graduate work, as in Group Z. 

3. Departmental requirements, as in Group 1. 
4 Five units in Education, as in Group 2. 

5*. One-half year (following the graduate study) in an ap- 
proved Normal school. 
Group 5— Library School Group 

Candidates ^who desire to spend the graduate year at the 
California State Library School following a course specially 
arranged for college graduates. 

1. Bachelor's degree as in Group 1. v 

2. One year graduate study at the California State Library 

°3 .^Departmental requirements (thirty units in the major 
and required work in the minor). 

4. Fifteen units in education, as in Group 1. 

The departmental requirements mentioned above are in ad- 
dition to the technical requirements laid down by the State 



The College of Liberal Arts 51 

Board of Education. The University of Southern California 
requires as preliminary to any recommendation for the teach- 
er's certificate, the completion of enough work (and of suffi- 
ciently high grade) in at least one subject to secure a 
University recommendation that the candidate is fitted to 
teach that subject in high school classes. If the candidate's 
undergraduate preparation in the stated subject has been 
satisfactory, this may be obtained in the time-limits specified 
above. 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

The War Department on April 14, 1918, established at the 
University a unit of the Senior Division, Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps. This empowers the Department of Military 
Training to grant the commission of second lieutenant in 
the United States Army to men graduating from the four- 
year military course. The curriculum is that officially deter- 
mined by the War Department. 

The basic course, covering two years, is compulsory for all 
men students. The intensive course of two years additional, 
leads directly to the commission. Engineering and mathe- 
matics, as well as military science and tactics, are included. 
Colonel L<. M. Koehler, U. S. A. Retired, is commandant by 
War Department appointment. 

Students in the R. O. T. C. are eligible for summer officers' 
training camps. All receive $14 yearly commutation for uni- 
forms and (in the two higher years) about $12 a month for 
rations. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

Lower Division courses are given numbers from 1 to 99; Upper 
Division courses, 100 to 199; Graduate courses, 200 to 299. Ordin- 
arily students should elect only courses in the divisions in which 
they are enrolled. 

Courses marked "throughout the year" are continuous courses 
and cannot be commenced in the second semester. 

AGRICULTURE 

GILBERT E. BAILEY, LAIRD J. STABLER, ALBERT B. ULREY, 
ANDREW C. LIFE, SAMUEL RITTENHOUSE, Professors 

The subjects that underlie practical agriculture are taught 
in the courses listed below. In these may be laid a founda- 
tion, broad as the range of practice and interests of the farmer 
at the present day, and upon which the student may build a 
career as an agriculturist or develop into a specialist in some 
one department of that field. 

1. Mineral Composition of Soils. A study of the more im- 
portant minerals. Laboratory, recitations and lectures bee 
Geology 2. Two units, throughout the year. (Bailey. ; 

2 Field Botany and Taxonomy. The habitats, pollina- 
tion and relationship of plants. See Botany 2. Three units, 
either semester. (Life.) 

3 Ecology. The relation of plants to their environment 
of soil, water, physiography, etc. Prerequisite, Botany 1. 
Two units, second semester. 

4. Plant Physiology. See Botany 4. Prerequisite, Botany 
1 Three units, first semester. (Life.) 

101. Agricultural Geology. Lectures on the origin com- 
position, classification and naming of soi s; .control of aera- 
tion and moisture condition; physical analysis of soils. Two 
units, either semester. (Bailey.) . \ 

102 Agronomy. Lectures on methods of cultivation ot 

the difffrfnrtypes of soils; effect of tillage, soil hygience; 

adaption to crops; fertility of soils, fertilizers. Two units; 

first semester. (Bailey.) 

110. Economic Botany. This cours \ dea i'Tnv Xs Two" 
sitic fungi and other economic phases. See Botany 105. lwo 

units; either semester. (Life.) 

Ill Plant Propagation and Genetics. A study ot tfte 
priidple^ See Botany 104a. Two units; 

second semester. (Life.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 53 

120. Embryology. The general problems of comparative 
embryology, with special application to the chick and the 
frog. Prerequisites, Zoology 1 and 104. Three units; second 
semester. (Rittenhouse and assistants.) 

121. Mammalian Anatomy. The dissection and study of 
type mammals. See Zoology 107. Three units; second 
semester. (Rittenhouse.) 

122. Economic Entomology. Orchard, field crop, and gar- 
den insect pests, the forest insects and household visitors. 
Consideration is given the control and eradication of insect 
depredations, the composition and application of insecticides, 
and farm management to eliminate injurious insects. Lec- 
tures and laboratory work. Prerequisite, course 1 in Zoology 
(or an equivalent amount of Botany together with the in- 
sect aspects of course 1). Three units; second semester. (Rit- 
tenhouse.) 

123. Parasitology. The organization, life history, and evo- 
lution of parasites; the protozoa and their relation to disease; 
the role of insects, ticks, and mites in the transmission and 
propagation of disease, together with their control as a phase 
in medical entomology; and a study of helminthes and larger 
parasites. Lectures and laboratory work. Prerequisite, 
course 1 (or equivalent in Botany) and General Biology 3 
(Bacteriology). Three units; first semester. (Rittenhouse.) 

130. Heredity. An introductory course on heredity deal- 
ing with the physical basis of inheritance, the laws of varia- 
tion and heredity, their application to economic and social 
problems. Two units; first semester. (Ulrey.) 

131. Bacteriology. The nature of the bacterial organism; 
its relation to disease; methods of cultivating and isolating 
it; inoculation experiments; staining of sections; examina- 
tion of water; etc... Prerequisite, Botany 1 or Zoology 1. 
Three units; first semester. (Ulrey.) 

140. Chemistry of Agricultural Products. A lecture course 
involving a critical study of soils, fertilizers, irrigation waters, 
and agricultural products. Should be accompanied or fol- 
lowed by course 141. See Chemistry 10. One unit; first 
semester. (Stabler.) 

141. Quantitative Analysis of Agricultural Products. 

Systematic analysis of soils, fertilizers, water, dairy products, 
and similar substances. Prerequisite, course 4 in Chemistry. 
See chemistry 110a. Three units; either semester. (Stabler.) 

For other courses of interest to the student of Agriculture see also: 

Physical Chemistry. Chem. 109. Irrigation. Civil Eng. 110. 

Mechanical Drawing. Draw. 1. Water Supply. Civil Eng. 111. 

Architectural Drawing. Arch. 3. Shop Work. Physics 21. 

Surveying. Civil Eng. 1, 2, and 13. Rural Sociology. Sociol. 118. 
Hydraulics. Civil Eng. 109. Labor Problems. Econ. 102. 



54 University of Southern California 

ART 

W. L. JUDSON, A. C. WEATHERHEAD, Professors 

ALMA MAY COOK, Lecturer 
MARIAN LEAVER, EDITH L. VIRDEN, Instructors 

1 Freehand Drawing. Lectures and class problems on 
the' application of mechanical principles to freehand drawing. 
Drawing from geometrical solids, casts, and natural objects, 
in pencil and charcoal. Six hours, two units; either semester. 
(Weatherhead.) 

Note— Art 1 or its equivalent is in general a prerequisite to all other 
courses in Art. 

3. Still Life. Painting of still life in pastel and water 
color. Three hours, one unit; throughout the year. (Leaver.) 

4 Drawing from the Figure. Drawing and painting from 
the' costumed model, in pencil, charcoal, pen and ink, and 
color. Figue composition. Six hours, two units; throughout 
the year. (Leaver.) 

5 Out-of-Door Sketching. Landscape in pencil, charcoal, 
and oils. Sketching trips to the hills and to the beach on 

" pleasant days. - Six hours, two units; second semester, 
(Weatherhead.) 

7. Elementary Design. The general principles that gov- 
ern design. Lectures and class problems. Three hours, one 
unit; throughout the year. (Leaver.) 

9 Clay Modeling. The modeling of ornament and parts 
of the human figure from casts. The designing and building 
of pottery. Three hours, one unit; second semester. 
(Leaver.) 

12. History of Art. A brief general course tracing the 
development of art through the most important periods. Two 
units; throughout the year. 

15 Interior Decoration. A study of the principles that 
underlie and condition beauty and fitness in house decorating 
and furnishing. A study of period styles. Cultivation of the 
taste of the student from a selective standpoint. Simple de- 
signing. Lectures and drawing. Six hours, two units; 
throughout the year. (Virden.) 

18 Art Appreciation. A non-technical course of illustrated 
lectures and gallery tours to acquaint the student with the 
fundamental principles, historical and modern governing 
art in galleries, municipalities, and as applied to everyday 
life in the home. Two units; throughout the year. (Cook.; 



The College of Liberal Arts 55 

BIOLOGY 

ALBERT B. ULREY (Zoology), ANDREW C. LIFE (Botany), 

SAMUEL RITTENHOUSE (Zoology), Professors 

CATHERINE V. BEERS (Zoology), Assistant Professor 

FRANK S. DAGGETT (Animal Distribution), L. E. WYMAN (Animal 

Ecology), Lecturers 

GERTRUDE LYNCH (Zoology), Research Assistant 

GEORGE W. GARNER, SARAH BURTON (Zoology), Assistants 

HALLIE MARVIN, GERTRUDE LYNCH, NANCY McMANIS 

(Botany), Assistants 

Courses for those who do not major in Biology but desire 
some knowledge of living nature and some training in sci- 
entific methods: Zoology 1, 108; General Biology 104, or 
Botany 1 and 2 or 4. 

Courses affording preparation for directors of physical 
education and health and development: Zoology 1 2- 104- 
107; General Biology 1, 2; 103, 104. 

Courses preparing for Agriculture: Zoology 1, 2- 104- 
109; Botany 1-4, 105a, 107; General Biology 1, 2; 103, 104; 
certain courses in Chemistry, Physics and Geology; general 
studies required in the course to be pursued. 

For the equipment of the department of Biology see under 
the heading "General Information." 

Zoology 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. General Zoology. This course is designed to give a 
general knowledge of the animal kingdom and an introduction 
to more advanced courses in biology. In the laboratory each 
student studies with the microscope, or dissects, typical ani- 
mals selected from the different groups from the simple to 
the more complex forms. The lectures co-ordinate the labo- 
ratory work, show the natural relationships of animals and 
explain the general problems of biology. Four units* 
throughout the year. (Rittenhouse, Beers.) 

2. Physiology. Lectures and laboratory work on (a) the 
general functions of all living organisms; (b) human physi- 
ology. Prerequisite course 1 or Botany 1. Three units; 
second semester. (Ulrey, Beers.) 

103. Systematic Zoology. The course deals chiefly with 
birds and fishes with reference to (a) taxonomy and biblio- 
graphy; (b) ecology, giving particular attention to the animal 
in its usual environment. Laboratory study, nele work and 
lectures. Two units; first semeste (Ulrej Daggett, 

Wyman.) 



56 University of Southern California 

104 Histology. This course gives the student an oppor- 
tunity to study the chief tissues of the mammalian body; and 
to learn the methods of preparation of tissues, with practice 
in cutting, staining and permanently mounting sections. 
Laboratory work and lectures. Prerequisite, course 1. Three 
units; first semester. (Rittenhouse.) 

105 Embryology. A course which deals primarily with 
the study of the development of the hen's egg and the forma- 
tions of the organs in the embryo chick. In the laboratory 
the student learns to make his own serial sections. Ine 
lectures include the general problems of comparative embry- 
olosrv with special application to the chick and the trog. 
Prerequisites, courses 1 and 104. Three units; second 
semester. (Rittenhouse and Assistant.) 

106. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. The labora- 
tory work consists of dissection of the mam types of the 
vertebrate animals, and a study of the relationships of the 
different systems of organs. The lectures deal with a com- 
parative study of the organs of the vertebrate body, especially 
From the standpoint of development. Prerequisites courses 
1, 104 and 105. Three units; first semester. (Rittenhouse.) 

107. Mammalian Anatomy. The course consists of a care- 
ful dissection and study of type mammals,_ especially the 
rabbit, cat and dog; with collateral reading m humanana- 
omv In the lectures special attention is given to the nervous, 
blood and skeletal systems, including an outline of their 
development. Prerequisite, course 1. Three units; second 
semester. (Rittenhouse.) 

108. Economic Entomology. A study of orchard, field 
crop and garden insect pests, the forest insects and household 
visitors. Consideration is given the control and eradication 
of insect depredations, the composition and application ot in- 
secticides, and farm management to eliminate injurious in- 
sects Lectures and laboratory work. Prerequisite, course 1 
(or an Equivalent amount of Botany together with the insect 
aspects of course 1). Three units; second semester. (Rit- 
tenhouse.) 

109. Parasitology. The organization, life history, and evo- 
lution of parasites; the protozoa and their relation to disease; 
the role of insects, ticks, and mites in the transmission and 
propagation of disease, together with their control as a phase 
fn medical entomology; and a study of helminthes and larger 
narasites Lectures and laboratory work. Prerequisite, 
course 1 (or equivalent in Botany) and General Biology 3 
(Bacteriology) Three units; first semester. (Rittenhouse.) 

210 Soecial Zoology. An investigation of some problem 
of limited scope The course is planned for the needs of each 



The College of Liberal Arts 57 

student. Six hours per week throughout the year. Pre- 
requisites, courses 1, 2, 103, 104, 105, or their equivalent. 
Three units. (Ulrey.) 

211. Teacher's Course. A study of the problem of teaching 
Zoology and Biology in the secondary schools. Two units; 
first semester. (Ulrey, Beers.) 

212. Research. Investigation of some problem relating to 
pure or applied biology may be pursued by candidates for 
the- degree of Master of Arts. (Ulrey, Rittenhouse.) 

Major Work in Zoology. Courses 1, 2; 103-106; General 
Biology courses 103, 104, 107. 

Minor Work in Zoology. Zoology 1 and General Biology 

103, 104. 

High School Teachers' Recommendation in Zoology. 

Zoology 1, 2, 103, 106, 108, 210; General Biology 1, 2, 103, 

104, 106. 

General Biology 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Personal Hygiene. Lectures and recitations on the 
preservation and improvement of health. The course deals 
with the functions and care of the body with a view to attain- 
ing the greatest possible degree of efficiency. Open to all 
students. Two units; first semester. (Ulrey.) 

2. Sanitary Science. A course of lectures on public hy- 
giene. The study includes (1) the nature of infectious dis- 
eases, their dissemination and control; (2) the problems of 
water supply and sewage; (3) the distribution and care of 
foods in relation to the public health; (4) sanitary surveys 
of residences, resorts, and public buildings; (5) the various 
agencies for the federal, state and municipal supervision of 
public health. Two units; second semester. (Ulrey.) 

3. Principles of Biology. A lecture course on the general 
principles of Biology. Elective for students who have no 
zoology or botany, but wish some knowledge of animal and 
plant life. Two hours per week; second semester. (Ulrey.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Heredity. An introductory course on heredity dealing 
with the physical basis of inheritance, the laws of variation 
and heredity, their application to economic and social prob- 
lems. Two units; first semester. (Ulrey.) 

101. History of Biology. This course traces the develop- 
ment of biology and brings out the chief contributions made 



58 University of Southern California 

to the science by the great naturalists from Aristotle to the 
present time. Lectures, collateral reading and papers. Pre- 
requisite, Course 1. Two units; second semester. (Ritten- 
house.) 

103. General Bacteriology. Lectures on the principles of 
bacteriology with emphasis on the economic phases of the 
subject. Laboratory work coordinated with the lectures. 
Three units; first semester. (Ulrey, Beers.) Prerequisite, 
Botany 1 or Zoology 1. 

103a. Economic Bacteriology. A laboratory course deal- 
ing primarily with -bacteriological investigation of problems 
of sanitation and public health. Prerequisites, General Biol- 
ogy 103. Three units; second semester. (Ulrey, Beers.) 

104. Bionomics. A course of lectures dealing with the 
fundamental principles of Biology. The problems of inheri- 
tance, development and sex are considered from the cytologi- 
cal standpoint throughout the first 'semester. Natural Selec- 
tion and other theories of evolution; heredity and race im- 
provement are studied during the second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Zoology 1 or Botany 1. Two units; throughout the 
year. (Ulrey.) 

105. Microscopical Technique. A course dealing with spe- 
cial methods of Microscopy. Laboratory work and lectures. 
Two units; either semester. (Ulrey.) 

106. Seminar. The advanced students and instructors of 
' the department meet for reports on special investigation and 

present-day problems of biology. One unit; throughout the 
year. (Ulrey, Rittenhouse, Beers.) 

107. Journal Club. Reports on the current literature of 
Biology. One unit; throughout the year. (Ulrey.) 

At the Venice Marine Station 

Primarily for Graduate Students 

208. Biological Survey. A study of the marine animals and 
plants of the region, including their habitat, classification, 
distribution, and life habits. (Ulrey, Rittenhouse.) 

209. Experimental Biology. The course consists of a study 
of some special problem of biology for which the student's 
training prepares him. (Ulrey, Rittenhouse.) 

210. Research. A limited number of private laboratories 
are available for free use by investigators who are prepared 
to carry on such work. Investigation may be carried on 
throughout the year. Application for these privileges snould 
be made to the director of the station. (Ulrey, Rittenhouse.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 59 

Summer Course. The course consists of a study of Marine 
Biology in connection with the exploration carried on by 
the use of the station launch, the Anton Dohrn. The work 
is given at the laboratories of the Venice Marine Biological 
Station. Formal instruction is given only during the regular 
summer session of the University. See Summer Session Bul- 
letin. 

Botany 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

t. General Botany. The course comprises a study of 
'typical plants representing the vegetable kingdom. The gen- 
eral morphology and structure of types of thallophytes, 
archegoniates, and spermatophytes are studied. Attention is 
also given to habitat, environment, and general physiological 
processes, and the agricultural phases of plants. Laboratory 
study, field work, and lectures. Four units; throughout the 
year. (Life, and assistants.) 

2. Field Botany and Taxonomy. A study of flowering 
plants (spermatophytes) in the local flora. The course deals 
with habitats, ^ pollination, and the relationship of plants. 
Lecture and six laboratory hours per week, one semester. 
Three units; either semester. (Life.) 

3. Ecology. The relation of plants to their environment 
of soil, water, physiography, etc., and their structural adap- 
tations. Especially suited to agricultural students. Lectures, 
and field and laboratory work. Prerequisite, course 1. 'Two 
units; second semester. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

104. Plant Physiology. Experimental work on the physi- 
ology of plants; lectures and supplementary reading. This 
course includes general experiments on the work and proc- 
esses carried on by living plants, and experiments on the 
fundamental processes with precise recording apparatus. 
Prerequisite, course 1. Three units; throughout the year. 
(Life.) 

105. _ Economic Botany. This course deals mainly with the 
parasitic fungi, their structure, dissemination and relation to 
cultivated* plants; also other economic phases of plants are 
given attention in the course. One lecture and three labor- 
atory hours per week. Two units; either semester. (Life.) 

105a. Plant Propagation and Genetics. A study of the 
principles of plant propagation with some practice in garden 
and field; also problems of variation and heredity in relation 
to . phylogeny and the improvement of plants. Lectures, 
quizzes, and field work. Two units; second semester. (Life.) 



60 University) of Southern California 

106. Teachers' Course. A series of experiments and exer- 
cises on the growth, structure, and propagation of plants. 
The place of Botany in the high school curriculum and the 
principles that determine the selection, organization, and use 
of botanical materials in the high school are discussed. Two 
units; first semester. (Life.) 

107. Plant Anatomy and Histology. The minute structure 
of the systems and tissues. Microscopical technique in pre- 
paring permanent mounts. Laboratory work and lectures. 
Prerequisite, course 1. Two units; either semester. (Life.) 

208. Marine Algae. The morphology, classification, and 
ecology of the marine flora, including collecting, mounting, 
and preserving the algae of the adjacent coast. Three units; 
either semester. (Life.) 

209. Advanced Botany. Special problems in advanced 
study of. plants for which the student is fitted by previous 
training. Three units; either semester. (Life.) 

210. Botanical Journal Club. One unit; throughout the 
year. (Life.) 

Major Work in Botany. Thirty semester units, including 
Courses 1-3, 104, and General Biology 3, Bacteriology. 

Minor Work in Botany. Botany 1, 2, and 3. 

High School Teachers' Recommendation in Botany: 1, 
General Botany; 2, Field Botany and Taxonomy; 104, Plant 
Physiology 105, Economic Botany, or 105a, Plant Propaga- 
tion and Genetics; 106, Teachers' Course; 107, Plant Anatomy 
and Histology, or 208, Marine Algae. General Biology: 10J. 
Bacteriology; 104, Bionomics. 



CHEMISTRY 

LAIRD J. STABLER, LEROY S. WEATHERBY, Professors 
EDWIN F. RATHJEN, Assistant Professor 
PERCY E. PALMER, Instructor 
GEORGIANA E. QUICK, Storekeeper 
ROBERT VIVIAN, DAVID MATLIN, WILLIAM CEREGHINO, 
ARTHUR VAN DER STEMPEL, ELMER PALMER, LILLIAN 
McILVAINE, CECIL COX, GRACE MEAD, GERTRUDE 
LEWMAN, Assistants 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Students without entrance credit in Chemistry should reg- 
ister in courses 1 and la; those with entrance credit should 
register in 2 and 2a. Course 2, 2a, 3 and 3a are prerequisite 
to all later courses in chemistry and comprise the required 
work in the engineering courses. 



The College of Liberal Arts 61 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry. A lecture and recitation 
course, covering the principles of inorganic chemistry. Open 
only to students who do not present entrance credits in 
chemistry. To be accompanied by course la. Three units; 
first semester. (Weatherby.) 

la. General Inorganic Chemistry. A laboratory course to 
accompany course 1. Two laboratory periods a week. Two 
units; first semester. (Instructor and Assistants.) 

Is. Elementary Organic, Food, and Textile Chemistry. 
Lectures and recitations introducing the composition and the 
chemistry of the simple fundamental organic compounds, es- 
pecially those related to daily life. The course includes 
a special study of foods and food values, fuels, fabrics, dyes, 
perfumes, poisons, adulterants, natural and artificial coloring 
compounds, and kindred topics. It is recommended to all 
non-technical students and is open to all who have had en- 
trance chemistry or courses 1 and la. 

To be accompanied by course Is. a. Three units; second 
semester. (Weatherby.) . 

(It is advised that students desiring this course who have had entrance 
chemistry, register the first semester in courses 2 and 2a.) 

ls.a. Elementary Organic, Food, and Textile Chemistry. 

A laboratory course accompanying and supplementing the 
work of course Is. Two laboratory periods a week. Two 
units; second semester. (Instructor and Assistants.) 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. Non-metals. Lectures and reci- 
tations with classroom demonstration's. Especial emphasis is 
placed on the principles- and laws of inorganic chemistry, 
and their application in analytical work. To be accompanied 
by course 2a. Three units; first semester. (Weatherby.) 

2a. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. A laboratory course 
to accompany Course 2. Especial emphasis is laid on quanti- 
tative relations and the development of chemical laws. The 
latter part of the course is devoted to a study of reactions 
in solution, introductory to qualitative analysis. Two labor- 
atory periods a week. Two units; first semester. (Weath- 
erby and Assistants.) 

3. Inorganic Chemistry. Metals. Lectures and recitations 
on the metals and metalloids, and their chief compounds, with 
especial reference to their technical value and commercial 
use. To be* accompanied by course 3a. Three units. Sec- 
ond semester. (Weatherby and Stabler.) 

3a. Qualitative Analysis. A laboratory course in the sys- 
tematic analysis and identification of simple and complex 
salts, mixtures, metals, alloys and commercial products. Two 
laboratory periods a week. Two units; second semester. 
(Weatherby and Assistants.) 



62 University of Southern California 

4a.; 4b. Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory practice in 
gravimetric and in volumetric determinations, with occasional 
lectures and recitations. Prerequisite to all subsequent 
analytical courses. Three laboratory periods a week. Three 
units; throughout the year. (Stabler and assistant.) 

UPPER DIVISION AND GRADUATE COURSES 

105. The Rarer Metals. A lecture course comprising a 
study of the occurrence, the metallurgy, the properties, and 
the uses of the more important rare metals, especially those 
valuable for their technical uses. One unit. (Not given 
1918-19.) 

105a. Analysis of the Rare Metals. A laboratory course 
involving the separation and identification of the rare metals. 
Especial stress is placed on the determination of these metals 
in their ores and in their commercial compounds. Two units; 
first semester. (Not given 1918-19.) 

106a. Inorganic Preparations. A laboratory course, in- 
cluding the preparation of inorganic compounds, with tests 
for purity and strength, supplemented by discussions on 
theory and methods. Two units; either semester. (Stabler.) 

107. Organic Chemistry. Lectures and recitations on the 
chemistry of the carbon compounds of both the aliphatic 
and the aromatic series. Especial emphasis on* synthetic 
organic chemistry. Two units; throughout the year. 
(Weatherby.) 

107a. Organic Preparations. A laboratory course in the 
preparation of typical carbon compounds in both the ali- 
phatic and the aromatic series, to accompany course 1U/. 
Two units; throughout the year. (Weatherby.) 

107b. Organic Preparations— Advanced. A laboratory 
course in the preparation of higher organic compounds, with 
supplementary reading on theory and methods. An exten- 
sion of course 107a. Either or both semesters. (Weath- 
erby.) 

108a. Mineral Analysis. Gravimetric and volumetric 
analysis of minerals, ores, and slags; rocks and cement; steel 
and alloys. Three units; first semester. (Stabler.) 

109. Physical Chemistry. A lecture course on the funda- 
mental principles and laws of chemistry. A general study 
of electro-chemistry is included in the work of the second 
semester. Two units; throughout the year. (Weatherby.) 

109a Physical Chemical Measurements. A laboratory 
course to accompany or follow course 109. One laboratory 
period a week. One unit; throughout the year. (Weatherby.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 63 

109b. Physical Chemical Measurements — Advanced. A 

laboratory course with supplementary reading. An extension 

of the work of 109a. Either or both semesters. (Weatherby.) 

110a. Quantitative Analysis of Agricultural Products. 

Systematic analysis of soils, fertilizers, water, cattle feed, 
dairy products, and similar substances. Three units; first 
semester. (Stabler.) 

Ilia. Medical andi Pharmaceutical Analysis. A labora- 
tory course, including urine analysis, toxicology, and assay of 
pharmaceutical products. Designed especially for students 
looking forward to medicine or pharmacy. Two units; either 
semester. (Stabler.) 

112a. Food Analysis. A laboratory course in the quantita- 
tive determination of the composition of food products and 
in the detection of food preservatives and adulterants. Ex- 
ercises in the analysis of sugar-house products and citrus 
by-products. Open only to those who have completed or 
are taking organic chemistry. Three units; second semester. 
(Stabler.) 

113. Industrial Chemistry. A lecture course covering the 
chemistry involved in the manufacture of important com- 
mercial products. The course is supplemented by lectures 
given by chemists from various manufacturing establish- 
ments, and by visits to technically important industrial 
plants. One unit; second semester. (Stabler.) 

113a. Oil, Gas, and Fuel Analysis. A laboratory course 
in the technical methods of oil, gas, and fuel analysis. A 
special oil laboratory is equipped for handling crude pe- 
troleum on a basis commensurate with commercial practice. 
One unit; second semester. (Stabler.) 

113b. Industrial Problems. The working on a semi- 
commercial scale of problems in industrial chemistry and 
chemical engineering. The course pre-supposes a knowl- 
edge of organic and of physical chemistry. Credit as ar- 
ranged; either or both semesters. (Stabler.) 

114a. Assaying. This course comprises silver and gold ex- 
traction by scorification and crucible methods; the fire assay 
of copper, lead, and tin; and the extraction of gold from 
ores by the amalgamation, the chlorination, the cyanide, and 
the electrolytic processes. One or two units; second seme- 
ster. (Stabler,) 

215. Seminar. Reviews of current chemical literature; 
lectures on subjects of chemical interest; papers and discus- 
sions on assigned topics. Open for credit to seniors and 
graduate students only. Required of all graduate students. 
One unit; throughout the year. (Weatherby.) 

216. Research. Research work, under the direction of the 
department, may be pursued by candidates for the degree of 



64 University of Southern California 

Master of Arts, in either pure or applied Chemfstry. (Stabler, 
Weatherby.) . 

217 Teacher's Course. A study of the teaching of chem- 
istry * in secondary schools. One unit; first semester. 
(Weatherby.) 

Laboratory Fees: In each laboratory course of two or 
of three units a fee of ten dollars each semester is required. 
In each one-unit course a five dollar fee is required In 
course 114a, an added fee of ten dollars is required to 
guarantee the cost of the materials consumed, of which the 
unused balance is returned at the end of the course. 

A deposit of five dollars is required of each student each 
semester to cover the value of apparatus broken or dam- 
aged. The balance of this deposit, less deductions, is re- 
turned at the close of the year. 

Major Work: Minimum requirement, thirty semester- 
units following entrance chemistry or courses 1 and la. 
Reauired courses: 2, 2a, 3, 3a, 4ab, 107, 107a. Further recom- 
mended I coufses 109, 109a, 113, 215, and at least ten units 
from the advanced analytical courses. 

Minor Work: Fifteen semester-units. Courses 1, la; Is, 
lsa; 2, 2a; or courses 2, 2a; 3, 3a, and either Is, lsa, or 4ab. 

High School Teacher's Recommendation. Inorganic 
Chemistry, Qualitative Analysis, Quantitative Analysis, Or- 
ganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Seminar, Teachers 
Course, and at least one advanced analytical course. 

Master's Degree: Not less than one-half of .the course 
pursued in the graduate year as candidate for the Masters 
Degree must be in Chemistry. The departments suggested 
from which approved minor courses may be - elected are 
Physics, Biology, Mathematics, and Geology. The required 
courses in Chfmistry beyond those required for an under- 
graduate major, part of which may have been taken ^as un- 
dergraduate electives, are 109, 109a, 113, 215, 216. the re 
search work, including the thesis, should represent from four 
to six units. 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Greek 

ELIZA G. WILKINS, (on leave), CLAUDE C. DOUGLAS, Professors 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1 Elementary Greek. A study of forms and syntax fol- 
lowed^ m the a rLding of portions of Xenophon V Anaba 
and exercises in prose composition. Three units, tnrougn 
out the year. (Douglas.) 

2. Greek Reading. Myths and Legends. Three units, 
Throughout the year. (Douglas.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 65 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

102. Greek Prose Writers. Selected orations of Lysias 
and Demosthenes: Plato's Apology. Lectures on the rise 
and development of Greek oratory, and the political and 
judicial institutions of Athens. Open to students who have 
completed course 1, or who offer at least two years of Greek 
for entrance. Three units; first semester. (Douglas.) 

103. Greek Prose Writers, continued. Plato's Apology 
(continued) and Crito: Selections from Herodotus and Thu- 
cydides. Lectures on the Greek philosophers, and a survey 
of the period covered by the historians studied. Open to 
students who have completed course 102. Three units* 
second semester. (Not given ,1917-18.) 

104. Homer. Iliad, Book I, selections from Books II and 
III: Odyssey, rapid reading of several books. Lectures on 
the Mycenean Age, and the Homeric Problem. Open to 
students who have completed courses 102 and 103 or their 
equivalent. Three units; first semester. (Not given 1917-18.) 

105. Greek Tragedy. Aeschylus' Promethus Bound: 
Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus or Antigone. Lectures on the 
rise and development of the Greek drama, the Greek the- 
ater and other plays not read in the class. Open to students 
who have completed the preceding courses. Three units- 
second semester. (Not given 1917-18.) 

106. History of Greek Literature. A lecture course ac- 
companied by the reading of the more important master- 
pieces in translation. Designed for students not majoring 
in the department. Two units; first semester. (Not given 
191/-lo.) 

107. History of Greek Art. A brief study of Greek archi- 
tecture, followed by lectures on the development , of Greek 
sculpture and its more important remains. Open to all Upper 
Division students. Two units; second Semester. (Not given 
I-7I/-I0.) 

110. New Testament Greek. Portions of the Gospels 
connected historically, with constant review of forms and 
constructions as a necessary basis for correct interpreta- 
tion and exegesis. Three hours throughout the year 
(Douglas.) 

111. Advanced New Testament Greek. An exegetical 
study of Galatians, Corinthians, Romans, Philippians, Thes- 
salomans and Hebrews. Three hours throughout the year 
(Douglas.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

208. The authors read in this course will vary from year 
to year according to the previous work and tastes of the 
students concerned. 



66 University of Southern California 

Latin 

RUTH W. BROWN, Professor 
WELCOME A. TILROE, Instructor 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1a Elementary Latin. A course in forms and syntax, fol- 
lowed by The Sing of simple prose and selections from 
Caesar. Five units; throughout the year. 

2b. Cicero and Virgil. Selected orations of acero:Vir- 
eil's iEeneid, Books I-IV. and parts of Book VI. l«*«>«£ 
for s^dents'who have completed 1 a or .two years of High 
School Latin. Three units; throughout the year. 

<t Cicero and Livy. Cicero, De Senectute: Livy, Book 
XXI. Sen to students who Present four units .of Latin for 
entrance, or who have completed 2b. Three units, 
semester. - x« 

4 Livv and Horace. Livy, Book XXII: Horace, Odes 
and Epol Open to students who have completed course 
3 Three units; second semester. 
' 5. Latin Syntax. A review of syntax in lectures and writ- 
ten exercises. To accompany course 3. Two units, hrst 
semester. 

6 Latin Prose Composition. Exercises in writing con- 
nected nafrafive and in rapid reading of easy prose. To ac- 
company course 4. Two units; second semester. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

These courses may be elected for graduate credit 
by special arrangement. 

107. Latin Comedy. Plautus; Captivi, and Trinummus or 
Rudens: Terence, Andria or Phorm.o. Ihree units, nrst 
semester. , A . 

108. Tacitus and Pliny, Tacitus; G ^TtnersThrel 
selections from the Histories: Pliny, selected Letters, lnree 

units, second semester. 

109 Cicero's Letters. Selected Letters with special study 
of contemporary events. Two units; first semester. 

no Horace's Satires and Epistles. Selected Satires and 
Epiiues^nduding^rArs Poetfca. Two units; second sem- 



ester 



(Not offered in 1918-1919.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 67 

112. Juvenal and Martial. Selections from the Satires of 
Juvenal and the Epigrams of Martial. Two units; second 
semester. (Not offered in 1918-1919.) 

115. Advanced Latin Prose Composition. One unit: 
throughout the year. ' 

120. History of Latin Literature. A general survey 
course, required of Latin majors, and open to Upper Division 
semeSr ^^ departments - Two units ; second 

GRADUATE COURSES 

^fiS 1 ^ Teac !" n g °* L atin. A study of problems and 
methods. Two units; first semester. 

218. Roman Philosophical Writers. Selections from Lu- 
cretius, Cicero and Seneca. Two units; first semester. (Not 
offered in 1918-1919.) 

219. Prose Writers of the Empire. Selections from Pe- 
tronius, Pliny the Elder, Quintilian, Suetonius, and Apuleius. 
lwo units; second semester. 

220. The Latin Seminar. Subject for 1918-1919: Roman 
Epic Poetry. Two units; throughout the year.. 

Major Work. Thirty units, including Latin 3, 4, 5, 6, 115. 
14J. A student may graduate as a Classical major who 
presents twenty units of Latin and at least twelve units of 
(jrreek. 

Minor Work. Courses 3, 4, 5 and 6. 

High School Teacher's Recommendation: An undergradu- 
ate major course followed by a minimum of six graduate 
units in this department, including 216. 

DRAWING 

A. C. WEATHERHEAD, A. W. NYE, C. W. LAWRENCE, Professors 

1. Mechanical Drawing. The use and care of instruments, 
lettering, geometrical problems, conic sections, orthographic 
projection oblique and isometric projection, and simple 
working drawings. Six hours, two units; first semester. 

in d°r t a C w^g. raWlng * ° V US equivalent is a Prerequisite to all other courses 

2. Mechanical Drawing. A continuation of course 1 Let- 
tering, mathematical curves, line shading, intersection and 
development of surfaces, working drawings, tracing and blue 

h dt ^ tW ° UnitS; sec(?nd semes *er. (Weath- 



68 University of Southern California 

3. Architectural Drawing. A course in architectural let- 
tering detailing, and the preparation of working drawings. 
SeTAVchitectufe 10. Six hours, two units; throughout the 
year. (Weatherhead.) , 

4. Technic of Drawing. Lettering, title building, **££** 
drawing in pencil arranged especially to meet the : needs ot 
engineering students, line shading, and. the technical details 
of draft ng in connection with electrical diagrams, topo- 
graphtc mfpping and steel construction. Six hours, two units, 
first semester. (Weatherhead.) 

5 Machine Drawing. The drawing of details and assem- 
blies of mSne parts from sketches made in the laboratories 
or from blue prints. Designing simple machines. Trac ng 
and blue printing. Six hours, two units; second semester. 
(Weatherhead.) ■ \ . , , 

fi Descriptive Geometry and Stereotomy. A study of the 
problemTrXfng to the pbint, line, and [plane , an Uh< ,rr ap- 
plication to practical engineering P r f ™lws Spcrfv 
development of surfaces, shades and shadows, . pe rspective 
and stereotomy. Six hours, two units; throughout the year. 

( ^ eat M e achinV Design. Advanced course in mechanical and 

steel. Three units; second semester. (Wye.) 

8 Shades and Shadows. Brief and ac f.^ate methods^for 
determining the shadows of geometrical lines, plane figures, 

second semester. (Weatherhead.) . 

100. Graphic Statics. The graphical determination of 
stresses in engineering structures. See Civil Engineering 
115 Three hours, one unit; first semester. (Lawrence.) 

101. Structural Design. Complete designs for steel 

semester. (Weatherhead.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 69 

ECONOMICS 

ROCKWELL D. HUNT, Professor 

OLIVER J. MARSTON, Associate 

FORBES LINDSAY, C. A. WAYNE, Lecturers 

EARL D. DAVIS, Assistant 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Principles of Economics. A comprehensive introduc- 
ion to economic studies, based upon a recent text, lectures, 
ssigned readings, and student exercises. Three units; 
iroughout the year. (Hunt and Davis.) 

Note — Economics 1 is recommended to students taking the six hours 
quirement (History or Economics) in this department. It is in general 
•erequisite to all other courses in Economics. 

2. Money, Credit, and Banking. The origin and eyolution 
f money, with special attention to the problems of metallic 
id paper money, and to leading systems and newer prob- 
ms of banking. Three units; first semester. (Marston.) 

3. Public Finance. A study of budgetary science, the prin- 
ples and practice of taxation, public expenditures, and finan- 
al administration. Attention is given to problems of war 
lance. Three units; second semester. (Marston.) 

4. Fiscal and Industrial History of America. A compre- 
ssive survey of American economic development and of 
itional legislation in the fields of currency, finance, and 
ie tariff. Two units; first semester. (Marston.) 

Economic Geography. History and present status of 

dustry and commerce in the world; the world market, and 

itional policies in the development of resources, especially 

the United States. (Same as Geology 104.) Two units, 

cond semester. (Bailey.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Municipal Problems. The rise and growth of the 
odern city. Chief emphasis is placed on American muni- 
sal government. Economic, administrative, and social prob- 
b. Three units; first semester. (Hunt.) 

102 Labor Problems. The important labor problems of 
t day, with special reference to American conditions, 
iree units; second semester. (Hunt.*) 

103. Americanization and Immigration. A study of the 
neral causes of migration in the world's history; European 
ckgrounds of immigration to the United States. Special 
lpnasis on present-day immigration problems. (Same as 
ciology 103,) Three units; second semester. (Bogardus.) 



70 University of Southern California 

104. Corporations. Causes, growth and forms; their pro- 
motion, financiering, incorporation, capitalization and con- 
solidation. Analysis of reports, stock speculation, receiver- 
ships and reorganizations. Social and political effects. Two 
units; first semester. (Marston.) 

105. Transportation and Communication. Theory and 
history. Development of the railroad, its organization, 
management, and consolidation. Ocean and inland water- 
ways. Two units; second semester. (Marston.) 

106. Commercial Organization. Attention to leading ex- 
tractive industries; special studies in certain industries, and 
student reports. Two units; first semester. (Marston.) 

107. Business Administration. An examination of the 
principles underlying the modern organization of business, 
both internal and external, with application of scientific 
management. Two units; second semester. (Marston.) 

108. Socialism. The underlying causes of the modern 
socialistic movement, study of various schools; a critical 
estimate of socialism as a philosophy of economic evolution 
and as a program of social reform. Two units; first semester. 
(Hunt.) 

109. The Liquor Problem. Economic aspects and social 
phases of the drink problem; examination of leading pro- 
posals for control or elimination. Open to sophomores. 
One unit; throughout the year. (Hunt.) 

110. Life Insurance. A comprehensive lecture course ^on 
the theory and practice of Life Insurance; special attention 
to the concrete problems. Open to Sophomores. One unit; 
either 'semester. (Lindsay, Wayne.) 

111. Agricultural Economics. History and problems of 
rural economics, followed by a study of agricultural com- 
merce. Two units; first semester. (Hunt.) 

112. Conservation of National Resources. Special prob- 
lems relating to the great war and reconstruction after the 
war. Human conservation and the foundations of national 
prosperity. Two units; second semester. Open also to^ 
sophomores. (Hunt.) 

GRADUATE COURSES . 

200. Seminar. Designed to meet the needs of graduate^ 
students of the department. Major reports are based uponj 
original investigation; reviewing- of recent books and period- 1 
ical literature; topics of contemporaneous interest. Two! 
units; throughout the year. (Hunt.) 

201. History of Economic Thought. Development from 
classical antiquity, with discussions of the different schools 



The College of Liberal Arts 71 

of economics. Extensive readings, with student reports. 
Iwo units; throughout the year. (Hunt.) 

202 Recent Economic Theory. A comparative study of 
the theories of contemporaneous economists and the ten- 
dencies of the present day. Special reference to the problems 
of value and distribution. Two units; throughout the year. 

Major Work in Economics: Thirty semester units. 

Minor Work in Economics: Eight units in addition to 
course 1, at least five of which must be in upper division 
courses. 

High School Teacher's Recommendation: 1, Principles- 2 
Money and Banking; 3, Public Finance; 101, Municipal Prob- 
lems; 102, Labor Problems; 104, Corporations, and 105, Trans- 
portation, or 106* and 107. Commercial Organization and 
Business Administration; 200, Seminar; 201, History of Eco- 
nomic Thought, or 202, Recent Economic Theory six units 
of additional approved work. 

EDUCATION 

THOMAS B. STOWELL, Professor 

HOWARD L. LUNT, EDGAR H. McMATH, Associate Professors 

ELIZABETH YODER, Assistant Professor 

«^ UGH C * WILLETT > Principal of the University High* School 

ROBERT J. TEALL. ARTHUR C. BROWN, ELSA H. HORSTMANN, 

Lecturers 

n^tuZ^° UVS ? 10 £' 199 ' in ± sIve ' are °P en to u PP er ^vision and grad- 
uate students only. Courses 200-206, inclusive, are open to graduates only. 

. !i 01 i/Si nd o? 2 'i Fundamental Psychology. See Psychology 1 
and 104. Six hours; two semesters. 

a 1( l 3 ^ Pri r nci P!es of Education, (including General Method). 
A study of educational principles which underlie the art of 
(S a towein Prerequisites 101 > 10Z Three units ; fir st semester. 

104 Principles of Secondary Education. The founda- 
tional principles; the distinctive functions of the various dis- 
ciplines. Three units; second semester. (Stowell.) 

.105. History of Education: Ancient and Medieval. Be- 
ginning with the earliest times and extending to the period 
ol the Reformation. Two units; first semester. (McMath.) 

f;. 106 ; 5 ist0I *y of Education: Modern. From the Reforma- 
tion to the present with a critical study of a number of edu- 
cational classics. Two units; second semester. (McMath) 



72 University of Southern California 

107 Aesthetics. The course considers the psychology of 
aelthetifSh? principles controlling th^expre^ono 
beauty and their application to the hine Arts, 
first semester. (Stowell.) 

108. School Organization, Administration, f*g™™>* 

schools. Two units; first semester. (McMath.) 

108a School Organization. An advanced study of prob- 

ence Two units; second semester, (lean.; 
109a. The Education of Exceptional Children Jhis course 

S d o1 S ^^ 

(Fernald.) 
119 Tnteroretation and Expression. Lectures on methods 

mmmmm 

114 Principles of Sociology. See Sociology 100. Threl 
units; first semester. (Bogardus.) 
• US Social Education. A study of the social phases o 

(Brown.) 

120. Immigration. See Sociology 103. Three umts; se, 
ond semester. (Bogardus.) 

1^1 Relieious Education. See Religious Education 12 
121 Twc ?3K throughout the year. (Montgomery.) 

122 Current Problems in Education A study of existu 
sySms^rtducation with special h ^TlZ^jtl 

123. High School Problems This course ^deal- wUh^ 
ffiBSTK °^e unt ; tK^-s^^McMath.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 73 

city. Vocational guidance, placement, and employment su- 
pervision. Industrial education. Five units; second sem- 
ester. (McMath.) 

127. School Supervision. This course is intended espe- 
cially for those who aspire to become city or county superin- 
tendents. Two units; second semester. (McMath.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

200. Philosophy of Education. An advanced course in 
educational theory. An investigation of the nature of the 
psychic activities which make education possible and de- 
sirable. Prerequisites — Courses 101-106. Three units; first 
semester. (Stowell.) 

201. Philosophy of Education. The possibility of Educa- 
tion; its assumptions; its place in human experience. A 
liberal education; its essence, its efficiency. Culture, its char- 
acteristics. Tests of college efficiency. Three units; second 
semester. (Stowell.) 

202. Practice in Teaching. Th©^ University High School, 
located on the University Campus, furnishes rare facilities for 
observation and for actual experience in handling and giving 
instruction to classes in Secondary Education. Five hours; 
one semester. 

203. Secondary Education. This course considers the 
origin, growth, organization, administration, supervision, and 
management of the American high school. It is designed 
primarily to meet the needs of candidates for the high school 
certificate. Two units. (Teall.) 

204. • Administration of National School Systems. Admin- 
istration, organization, curricula, and methods of teaching in 
German, French, and English schools, including elementary, 
secondary, and higher schools. A comparative study. Two 
units; first semester. (McMath.) 

205. School Surveys. A course in city school administra- 
tion. The reports of various school surveys will be studied 
with a view to learning the recommendations of the various 
experts in educational administration. Two units; second 
semester. (McMath.) 

206. Statistical Methods. The functions of averages, 
laws of dispersion, coefficients, graphs, etc. A text-book 
course with problems. Two units; first semester. (McMath.) 

Undergraduate Major Work: Thirty semester units. The 
following courses are required: 103, 104 or 123, 105, 106, 
108 or 108a, and one Teachers' Course (if offered), **.ie balance 
elective. 



74 University of Southern California 

Requirements for the Degree Master of Arts: Major m 
Education. In addition to the Undergraduate Education 
Major, the graduate units must include Courses 200 or 201, 
204, 203 or 205, and 206. 

For Special Courses in Education, see the several depart- 
ments, as follows: 

Teachers' Course in Botany, see Botany 106. 
Teachers' Course in Chemistry, see Chemistry 217. 
Teachers' Course in Drawing, see Drawing 102. 
Teachers' Course in English, see English 295. 
Teachers' Course in French, see French 111. 
Teachers' Course in German, see German 211. 
Teachers' Course in History, see History 220.. 
Teachers' Course in Latin, see Latin 216. 
Teachers' Course in Mathematics, see Mathematics 210. 
Teachers' Course in Physics, see Physics 206. 
Teachers' Course in Spanish, see Spanish 222. 
Teachers' Course in Zoology, see Zoology 211. 

Teachers' Courses, even when taken in graduate standing, 
cannot be included as part of the work for the Master's de- 
gree. 

Special Summer Courses will be offered in Education; see 
Announcement of the Summer School. 



ENGINEERING COURSES ELECTIVE IN ARTS 



The following courses in engineering are open to students 
in the College of Liberal Arts, but not more than a total 
of 18 units may be counted toward the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. These courses may also be offered by engineering 
students seeking credit in the department of Liberal Arts, 
but in such transfer of credits not more than 18 units will be 
accepted for any one semester's work. 

Units 

Drawing (4 and 5) — - \ 

Descriptive Geometry (Drawing 6) 4 

Surveying (C. E. 1 and 2) --»----- \ 

Analytical Mechanics (C. E. 107) - a 

Sanitary Engineering (C. E. 112)...... - * 

Materials of Construction (C. E. 13) o 

Dynamo Machinery (E. E. lOlab) 1U 

Dynamo Laboratory (E. E. 102)...... - * 

Steam Engineering (E. E. 4 and 5) , ~ 4 

Alternating Currents (E. E. 103a) i> 



The College of Liberal Arts 75 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

ALLISON GAW, PAUL S. WOOD, BENJAMIN F. STELTER, 

JAMES MAIN DIXON, Professors 

ELIZABETH YODER, Associate Professor 

M. PAULINE SCOTT, MARYETTE G. MACKEY, Assistfcht Professors 

CHARLOTTE M. BROWN, WILLIAM PALMER, Instructors 

DOROTHY M. GARDINER, MARION HELM, NORA L. McNEESE, 

Assistants 

1. Introductory Course. Practice in composition, based 
upon a study of representative works in English literature. 
Required of all candidates for the bachelor's degree. Three 
units; throughout the year. (Gaw, Wood, Scott, Mackey, 
Gardiner.) 

lb. Training in spelling and punctuation; for students fail- 
ing to pass a test in those subjects. No credit is given for 
lb, but it must be passed before a student receives credit for 
English 1. One hour; each semester. (Helm, McNeese.) 

9. Reference and Bibliographic Course. Training in 
methods and material used in research. Use of encyclo- 
pedias, dictionaries, investigation of a subject in a library. 
Lectures and practical work. Either semester, one unit. 
(Brown). 

10. Argumentation and Debate. A course in practical 
Argumentation and Debate. The main objects are the train- 
ing of students in the analysis of questions, the writing of 
briefs and preparation of debates, and the effective delivery 
of arguments upon the platform. This class will form the 
nucleus from which the debating teams will be chosen to 
represent the University in the various annual intercollegiate 
debates. Two units; first semester. (Palmer.) 

20. General History of English Literature. Required of 
all students intending to do major work in English, and in 
general prerequisite to all courses in literature above Sopho- 
more grade. Three units; throughout the year. (Stelter, 
Scott.) 

50. Types of Literature. An introduction to the study of 
literature, with emphasis upon the various literary types in 
prose and verse. Two units; throughout the year. (Mackey.) 

62. History of the Short Story. A study not only of the 
historical development, but also of the technique and the 
literary appreciation of the short story. Not offered 1917-18. 
Two units; second semester. (Scott.) 

63. Studies in the Modern Novel. An analytical study of 
representative English, French and Russian novels. The 
work of the first semester is mainly concerned with the ro- 



76 University of Southern California 

mance of action; that of the second with the novel of char- 
acter. Two units; throughout the year. (Wood.; 

63a. The Artistry of the Novel. A genetic study of "A 
Tale of Two Cities, ,, for teachers. One unit; first semester. 
(Gaw.) 

70 G?eat Books and Their Writers. A study of the 
authors' personal viewpoints and their solutions of the prob- 
lems of life. The course includes selected works of Gals- 
worthy, George Eliot, Thackeray, Arnold, Browning, Scott, 
Johnson, Swift, Milton, and Shakespeare. Two units; 
throughout the year. (Scott.) 

98 Public Lecture Course. Contemporary Literature. 
Popular lectures on contemporary poetry and prose, with 
illustrative readings. Admission and credit as in Course 99' 
One unit; second semester. Not offered -1917-18. (Wood.j 

99 Public Lecture Course. Modern Plays. Readings and 
interpretations of recent dramas. One unit of credit, granted 
upon passing an examination on the lectures and required 
?ead1nS, will be given to regular undergraduate students above 
Freshman gradf. Open to the public without charge. Nol 
offered 1917-18. One unit; second semester. (Gaw.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

Note— Manv of the following courses may also, under certain conditions 
be decked by graduate student! for graduate credit; but such a^ngemen 
£ dependent upon the details of the student's previous preparation an 
usually ^involves P the satisfaction of special arrangements as to the worl 
of the course. 

103. 'Advanced Composition. Narrative and descriptive 

writing. Prerequisite, a high grade in English 1. Two units 
both semesters. (Stelter.) 

110. Introduction to the Study of Language. The progress 
sive and conservative forces entering into linguistic eyolu 
ion; the relations of English to the other members _o i th 
Indo-European group; the general history of the Enghst 
Suage in England' Open to Sophomores wit! i adequat, 
preparation. Three units; second semester. (Gaw.) 

112 Old English. A study of West Saxon English prio 
to the Norman Conquest, with, emphasis upon its relation 
to the English of today, and with some attention to the lit 
erary importance of the readings in prose and verse Re 
quired of all English majors. Three units; throughout th 
year. (Gaw.) 

122. Beowulf. A reading of selected P assa S e %™ h t j^"* 
ca comment. The course is primarily literary, not philojog, 
cal. Prerequisite, English 112. Not offered 1917-18. lw 
units; second semester. (Gaw.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 77 

126. The Period of Chaucer. A survey of Chaucer's life 
life and times; readings principally in the ''Canterbury Tales" 
and "Troilus and Cressida." Two units: second semester. 
(Stelter.) 

129. Non-Dramatic Literature of the Elizabethan Period, 
1557-1660. A study of the principal authors and types of non- 
dramatic literature of the period. Chief attention is given to 
Spenser. Two units; first semester. (Stelter.) 

Note — For Elizabethan Dramatic Literature see courses 154, 154b, 
154c, and 156. 

133. The Period of Milton. Milton's poetry and most im- 
portant prose. Selections from the Church poets, Cavaliers, 
and prose writers of the period. Three units; second sem- 
ester. (Stelter.) 

135. The Classical Period. 1660-1760. Dryden, the Augus- 
tans, Johnson and his circle, the evolution of Journalism, 
deism, the rise and decline of Neo-Classicism. Not offered 
1917-18. Two units; throughout the year. (Wood.) 

137. The Romantic Period. 1760-1832. Chief attention 
is given to Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and 
Keats. Three units; first semester. (Stelter.) 

137a. The Prose of the Romantic Period. Two units; 
second semester. (Stelter.) 

140. The Victorian Period, 1832-1892. Chief attention is 
given to Tennyson, Browning, Carlyle, Newman, Ruskin, 
Arnold, the Pre-Raphaelites, and Swinburne. Two units; 
throughout the year. (Wood.) 

143. Contemporary British and American Poets. A con 

sideration of the chief writers of verse in the English lan- 
guage since the death of Tennyson. Three units; first sem- 
ester. (Wood.) 

145. American Literature. A survey from the beginning 
to the present day. A careful study of Colonial and Revolu- 
tionary writing is used as the basis for a consideration of 
the chief Nineteenth Century productions. Throughout |he 
course, especial attention is paid to the relations between 
American and British literature. Two units; throughout the 
year. (Wood.) 

154-156. Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Drama. A de- 
tailed study of a series of plays by Shakespeare, his predeces- 
sors, and his contemporaries, in the light of English dramatic 
history and social conditions. Two units; throughout the 
year. (Gaw.) 

154b. Shakespeare's Historical Plays. For description of 
this course see Department of History, course 102. Two 
units; one semester each course. (Dixon.) 



78 University of Southern California 

154c. Shakespearean Tragedy. A detailed study of four of 
Shakespeare's tragedies. Prerequisite, course 154. Not ot- 
tered 1917-18. Two units; second semester. (Stelter.) 

158 The Modern Drama. The history of the English 
drama from 1660 to the present day, with especial emphasis 
upon the influence of Ibsen. Three units; throughout the 
year. (Gaw.) 

158a. Contemporary Drama. A brief survey of some pres- 
ent-day productions. One unit; second semester. (Gaw.) 

160. The English Lyric. A study of the lyric as a form, 
with a survey of the leading types in English. Not offered 
1917-18. Two units; one semester. (Stelter.) 

166. The English Essay. A study, historical and critical, 
of the essay as a literary form from Bacon to the present 
time. Not offered 1917-18. Two units; one semester. 
(Steiter.) ^ . 

177 Bunyan. A study of the life and works of the Fun- 
tan allegorist and idealist. Not offered, 1917-18. Two units; 
first semester. (Dixon.) 

180a Burns. A study of the central figure of modern 
Scottish lyrical poetry and his literary environment. Two 
units; second semester. (Dixon.) 

181. Studies in the Romantic Poets. Prerequisite, English 
137. Two units; throughout the year. (Stelter.) 

182a. Scott as an Historical Novelist. Special attention 
is given to "Old Mortality", "Roy Roy", "Waverly , and 
"Guy Mannering." Two units; first semester. (Dixon.) 

183c. Browning. A study of the art and teaching of Rob- 
ert Browning, with special attention to "The Ring and the 
Book." Three units; second semester. (Wood.) 

184b Ruskin. His ethical, esthetic, and economical teach- 
ings. 'Not offered, 1917-18. Two units; first semester. 
(Dixon.) M 

184c. Emerson. A brief introduction to the P*»\osophy 

and poetry of Emerson. One unit; second semester. (Wood.) 

191 Versification. A study of the principles and forms 

of English verse. Practice in verse-writing. One unit; 

throughout the year. (Stelter.) 

193 English Translations of the Classics. The Greek 
masterpieces are emphasized; selections are chosen for the 
bearing of the original works upon English literature. Two 
units; either semester. (Stelter.) 

196 The Development of Democracy in English Litera- 
ture ' The growth of the idea of democracy as reflected in 
the works of English writers, from the earliest times to our 
own. Sophomores with adequate preparation are admitted. 
Two units; first semester. (Mackey.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 79 

197. Oral Interpretation. For description of the course 
see Education 112. This course is required of all English 
major candidates for the High School Teacher's Certificate 
who are not already satisfactorily equipped in this respect, 
bucn candidates are advised to satisfy the requirement in 
their senior year. Open only to Seniors preparing for teach- 
ing or to graduate students. Two units; first semester. 
(Yoder.) 



GRADUATE COURSES 



224. Early Middle English Literature. A study of typical 
literary forms between 1100 and 1350. Not offered, 1917-18 
Two units; second semester. (Gaw.) 

264. The History of the Novel. The development of the 
European novel, with especial attention to its production in 
England Not offered, 1917-18. Two units; throughout the 
year. (Wood.) 

291. Theories of Poetry. A study of the chief theories of 
poetry and literary criticism and the types of poetic litera- 
ture, with illustrations drawn mainly from the English poets 
Two units; throughout the year. (Stelter.) 

i: 29 ru1 he i, E J n§lish Seminar. Subject for 1917-18: The 
English Ballad. One unit; throughout the year. 

295. The Teaching of English. A study of the problems, 
methods, materials, and bibliography. Required of all candi- 
dates for the High School Teacher's Certificate offering Eng- 
lish as major. Graduate course, but not credited toward the 
degree of Master of Arts. Three units; first semester. 
(Gaw.) 

Advisers. For advice concerning the various details of 
their work (including thesis) graduate students electing Eng- 
lish as major subjects, and English major seniors who are 
prospective candidates for the High School Teacher's Certi- 
ficate, will confer with the head of the department. Each 
undergraduate English major student will, at the beginning 
ot the sophomore year, choose a permanent adviser from 
among the three chief members of the English faculty. 

Undergraduate Major Work. Thirty semester units, in ad- 
dition to English 1. In major work in English all students 
must include courses 20 and 112. Those who contemplate 
pursuing graduate work for the attainment of the degree of 
Master of Arts are notified that their undergraduate course 
must be so planned as to equip them with a reading knowl- 
edge of Greek, Latin, French, or German. 

Students doing major work in English are advised to avail 
themselves, early in the course, of the privilege of electing 
subjects in^ the College of Oratory. This statement applies 
with especial force to prospective teachers. 



80 University of Southern California 

Undergraduate students who contemplate the teaching of 
English should notify the head of the department of that 
fact at the beginning of the senior year. Failure to do so 
may entail complications that will render it impossible for 
them to secure the Certificate in the minimum time. 

Minor Work. Ten semester units in addition to course 1. 
Requirements for the High School Recommendation. An 
undergraduate English major course, followed by a minimum 
of eight graduate units in the English depar merit The 
course as a whole must include courses 20, 110, H2,a period 
course (see courses 121 to 149), 197 and 295 In addition the 
candidate must creditably pass the 'English final examina- 
tions for graduates", as described below. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts. A satis- 
factory undergraduate English major course, followed by a 
graduate courfe organized as prescribed in the .general regu- 
lations for the degree of Master of Arts (which see) and 
compliance with the requirements concerning the English 
final examinations for graduates", as indicated l below. Can 
didates for the degree of Master of Arts in English are also 
required to offer a reading knowledge of Greek, Latin, Ger 
man, or French. 

The English Final Examinations for Graduates: In addi- 
tion to The regular course examinations there will be required 
of al English major candidates for the degree of Master of 
Arts or for the High School Teacher's Recommendation a 
more comprehensivf test of their fitness for the honors m 
Question. This will require of the candidate evidence of a 
scholarly attitude of mind and an habitual use of scholarly 
methods y no less than a firm grasp of the subject-matter in- 
volved. The equipments required are: 

1. Familiarity, obtained at first hand with the chief mas- 
terpieces of English literature, with the history of its de- 
velopment? and with the methods of historical study. 

2? Satisfactory special knowledge of one of the main lit- 
erary periods, movements, types, or authors 

17 The ability to apply to a literary work of art of any 
of the well recognized types, the standard criteria, con 
structive, metrical, and stylistic. , o vj ,;„„,..•<.,.,> 

4 A scholarly acquaintance with the methods of "npistic 
study and with the history of the development of the English 
laneuaee through its three mam periods. 

5 S Skill in organizing and presenting thought orally and 

in writing. . „ 

The above examinations are conducted once every semester 

and must be take" at some time during the academic year a^ 

*£« IJwi nf which the degree or certificate in question is to 



The College of Liberal Arts 81 

specified. Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts must 
show high merit in three of the five divisions. In lieu of divi- 
sions 2 and 4 the candidate may offer final examinations in 
advanced courses covering material of the nature described, 
which examinations shall have been taken at this University 
within the same academic year. 

FRENCH 

EDGAR M. VON FINGERLIN, LAWRENCE M. RIDDLE, Professors 

KENNETH M- BISSELL, Assistant Professor 

EVA F. DE KERPEZDRON, Instructor 

1. Elementary French. Grammar, elements of phonetics, 
reading of French texts. Outlines of French political his- 
tory of the nineteenth century. Five units; throughout the 
year. (Riddle and Kerpezdron.) 

2. Modern French. Readings from the Romanticists and 
Realists including Chateaubriand, Hugo, Lamartine, Sand, 
Balzac, Daudet, Zola and Flaubert. Outlines of French lit- 
erature of the nineteenth century. Composition. Three 
units; throughout the year. (Riddle.) 

3. Modern French. Readings from contemporary French 
novelists, including Anatole France, Loti, Bourget and Bazin. 
Composition. Three units; throughout the year. Prerequi- 
site, course 1. (Bissell.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

106. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. A gen- 
eral survey with special attention to Corneille, Racine, and 
Moliere. Offered 1919-1920. Two units; throughout the year. 
(Riddle.) 

107. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. A gen- 
eral survey with special attention to Montesquieu, Voltaire, 
and Rousseau. Offered 1918-1919. Two units; throughout 
the year. (Riddle.) 

; 108. French Lyric Poetry of the Romantic School. Lamar- 
tine and Hugo. Interpretation of Romantic poetry accord- 
ing to such methods as those suggested by Roustan, "Precis 
d'explication franchise;" Rudler, "L'Explication franchise." 
One unit; second semester. (Riddle.) 

109. Advanced French Composition. Prerequisite, course 
2. One unit; throughout the year. (Von Fingerlin.) 

110. French Conversation. Students are divided into sec- 
tions of not more than ten each. Each section meets twice 
a week. Throughout the year, one unit a semester. (Ker- 
pezdron and Bissell.) 

111. Teachers' Course. The methods of teaching and the 
finer points of the language. While primarily intended for 



82 University of Southern California 

teachers, the course is open also to those who have finished 
course 106 or 107. Two units; second semester. (Von iun- 
gerlin.) 

112. Readings from French Political History. This course 
is conducted entirely in French by the conversational method. 
Open to specially qualified students after consultation with 
the instructor. Two units; throughout the year. (Bissell.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

221. French Seminar. Studies in French literature. Two 
units; throughout the year. (Riddle.) 

222. French Literature of the Renaissance. Special atten- 
tion is given to Rabelais, Ronsard, and Montaigne. Offered 
1918-1919. Two units; throughout the year. (Kiddle.; 

223. French Drama of the Seventeenth Century. First 
semester: Corneille and Racine; second semester: Moliere 
Offered 1919-1920. Two units; throughout the year. (Kiddle. j 

224. French Phonetics. The principles of phonetics in 
their application to French pronunciation. Passy-Rambeau 
"Chrestomathie phonetique." Two units; throughout the 
year. (Von Fingerlin.) 

225. Reading of Old French Texts. "La Chanson de Ro- 
land," "Aucassin et Nicolette," and selections from Bartsch- 
Wiese, "Chrestomathie de l'ancien frangais. One unit, 
throughout the year. (Riddle.) 

226. French Phonology and Morphology. Three units; 
throughout the year. (Von Fingerlin.) 

Undergraduate Major Work. Thirty units including 
courses 2 or 3, 106, 107, 109, and 112, and of which only five - 
units may be from course 1. The student must also pass 
an examination in the history of French literature. 

Undergraduate Minor Work. Ten units exclusive of course 
1 and including courses 2 or 3, and 109. 

Hieh School Teacher's Recommendation: The require- 
ments for major work, course 111, and a minimum of seven 
Sate units, including the seminar. The candidate must 
also pass an oral and a written examination in French syn- 
tax and French pronunciation. 

GEOLOGY 

GILBERT E. BAILEY, Professor 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1 Physiography of California. A study of the surface 
feature Tof ^California, and theirorigin California is a won- 
derland. Its surface includes snow-clad mountains, valleys 



The College of Liberal Arts 83 

below sea-level, beautiful lakes, waterfalls 2000 feet high, 
living glaciers, an active volcano, gigantic canyons, rich and 
fertile valleys, and arid deserts. All have a profound effect 
upon human life and the industries. Two units: first 
semester. 

2 \ Mineralogy. A study of the properties, uses and 
methods of determination of the most important minerals, 
ores, and gems. Laboratory, recitations, and lectures. Two 
units; first semester. 

3. Ores and Metals. Course 2 in the Department of 
Chemistry. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

104. General Geology. The history of the earth and its 
formations, flora and fauna, with special attention to the 
Pacific Coast region. Two units; first semester. 

105. California Geology. The geologic history of Cali- 
fornia in detail. Some of the topics are "How the moun- 
tains and valleys were built", "The glacial period, "Origin 
Sri? etr ° leum '" "History of the Yosemite," "Origin of gold/' 

The Rancho la Brea fossils." Two units; second semester. 

106. Agricultural Geology. Lectures on the origin, com- 
position, classification and naming of soils; controls of 
aeration and moisture condition; physical analysis of soils 
Open to all classes. Two units; first semester. 

107. California Mineralogy. Applied Mineralogy. The 
mineral resources of California, location, geology, manu- 
facture, and uses. Two units; second semester. 

108. The School Garden. The Eessentials of Agricul- 
ture. Lectures on methods of cultivation of the different 
types of soils; effect of tillage; soil hygiene; adaptation to 
crops; fertility of soils; fertilizers. Two units. Second 
semester. 



GERMAN 

MARGARET GRAHAM BORTHWICK, Professor 

BERTHA J. JACOBY-KIENLE, MYRTLE EMILY BILES, Associate 

Professors 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Elementary German. Pronunciation, reading, and 
grammar, with practice in speaking and writing German. 
Inis course is intended for students who enter without 
German. Five units; throughout the year. (Kienle.) 

iiniJ ^""" l - cannot . be credited toward the required number of 
units for either major or minor work in German. 



84 University of Southern California 

2. Modern German. For students who have had course 
1 or two years of high school German. Three units, 
throughout the year. (Borthwick, Kienle, Biles.) 

3. German Conversation. For those deficient in the oral 
use of the language. To follow or accompany German 2. 
Two units; throughout the year. (Biles.) 

4. Scientific and Journalistic German. For students spe- 
cializing in science. Open to those who have had course ,2, 
or its equivalent. Two units; throughout the year. (Biles.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

103. Schiller. Study of Schiller's life and. works. Open 
to students who have had course 2 or its equivalent. Three 
units; first semester. (Biles, Kienle.) 

104. Modern Historical Prose. Historical novels relating 
to important periods in the history of Germany. Three 
units; second semester. (Biles.) _ 

105. Grammatical Review. Open to those taking any 
course beyond 104. Two units; throughout the year. 
(Borthwick.) 

106. Heine. Study of Heine's life and works Open to 
those who have had course^l04, or its equivalent. Three 
units; first semester. (Biles.) 

107 Goethe. Introductory study of Goethe s life and 
works. Three units; second semester. (Biles.) 

116 Outline of German Literature. The development of 
German Hterature to the lyrics of .the thirteenth century. 
Two units; first semester. (Borthwick.) 

117 Outline of German Literature (continued), from 
the fourteenth century to modern times. Two units; second 
semester. (Borthwick.) . 

128 Nineteenth Century Readings. Representative dramas 
and novels from Grillparzer, Hauptmann Freytag, and Schef- 
fel Three units; first semester, (biles.) _ 

129. Goethe's Faust. Parts I and II. Three units; second 
semester. (Biles.) 

130. Hauptmann. A . study of Hauptmann s life and 
works. Two units. (Kienle.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

209. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century. The 
earlier and later romanticists and other poets. Three units, 
first semester. (Borthwick.) 

210 German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (con- 
tinued) T Te dramatists of the middle and of the latter half 
of the century. Three units; second semester. (Borthwick.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 85 

211. Teachers' Course. Two units; first semester.( Borth- 
wick.) 

212. Advanced Composition. Intended primarily for 
teachers whose major or minor is German. Two hours- sec- 
ond semester. (Borthwick.) 

222. Lessing. Study of Lessing's life. Selections from his 
dramas and prose writings. Three units; first semester 
(Borthwick.) 

223. Middle High German. Introductory Grammar. Se- 
lections from the "Nibelungen Lied" and "Armer Heinrich " 
Not offered, 1918-1919. (Borthwick.) 

224. Modern German Novel. A study of the German 
novel from 1850 to the present time. Chief attention is given 
to the works of Fontane, Stifter, Raabe and Freytag. Three 
units, second semester. (Borthwick.) 

Major Work: Thirty semester units, exclusive of course 1 
and including courses 105, 107, 116, 117 and 129. 

Minor Work. Ten units exclusive of course 1, at least four 
of which must be in upper division work. 

High School Teacher's Recommendation: Thirty semester 
units, exclusive of course 1, and including courses 103, 105, 
107, 116, 117; also a minimum of seven graduate units; includ- 
ing 211. Each candidate must pass an oral and written exam- 
ination in German grammar, reading and class-room conver- 
sation. 

The Degree of Master of Arts: The German departmental 
requirements for this degree include: The full undergraduate 
major course; a minimum of eight graduate units, exclusive 
of 211; and a final examination, both oral and written, on the 
history of German literature in general and on some period 
in which the candidate has done intensive work. 

HISTORY 

TULLY C. KNOLES, ROY MALCOLM, ROCKWELL D HUNT 

JAMES MAIN DIXON, FRANK J. KLINGBERG, Professors 

LESLIE M. GAY, JR., Associate Professor, (on leave) 

DELLA TOTTON EARLY, Assistant Professor 

JOHN E. HARLEY, GEO. HOMRIGHAUSEN, GLADYS 

KALLIWODA, Assistants 

ERNEST HORTON and VOLTAIRE PERKINS in the service of 

the Government 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. English History, with special reference to social and 
literary development. Textbook, supplemented by lectures, 
reports and collateral reading. Two unit's; throughout the 
year. (Klingberg.) 



86 University of Southern California 

2. Social and Political History of Modern Europe. A 

course covering the field of European History f««n *he fif- 
teenth century to the present time. Designed for the pur- 
pose of giving a general survey of the development of society, 
politics, science, and literature. Three units; throughout the 
year. (Klingberg.) . 

5 Greek History. A survey of Greek history from the 
earliest times to the death of Alexander the Great. Lectures, 
readings, and reports. Three units; first semester. (Knoles, 
Early.) , 

6. Roman History. A course covering the development 
of Rome from the foundations of the city to the close of the 
fourth century A. D. Lectures, readings and reports. Three 
units; second semester. (Knoles, Early.) 

7. Mediaeval History. A general survey of the mediaeval 
neriod with special reference to the development of great 
fnstituti^ns, both of church and state. Discussions on 
mediaeval conceptions. Lectures, reading, and papers. Three 
units; both semesters. (Knoles, Early.) 

13. History of the United States, 1787-1850. A study of 
the development and history of national life in the United 
States from 1787 to the Compromise of 1850. Lectures and 
special investigations. Considerable attention is paid to the 
development of political parties. Three units; first semester. 
(Malcolm.) 

13a History of the United States, 1850-1912. A continu- 
ation of course^ 13 from the Compromise of 1850 to the pres- 
ent time. Special attention paid to the period of reconstruc- 
tion and to the fields of political and economic development 
Lectures, reports, and investigations. Three units; second 
semester. (Malcolm.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101 History of England and Greater Britain. A course 
covering : the development of British history with special 
emphLsfs on the growth of the Empire. See Political Science 
106 Two units; throughout the year. (Klingberg.) 




trian 

V" (b) ine xoriasi icuaiu 6J , *..*«.*..., . -, -, - 

ar'd III " (c) "King John" and the days of Magna Charta 
(d) "Henry VIII" and the English break with Rome, (e) 
Br tish Legendary History: "Cymbeline," Lear." The vari- 
ous sections are given in successive semesters. Two units, 
either semester. (Dixon.) iL 

103. Scottish History... (a) Scotland in the sixteenth cen- 
tury with special attention to Scott's 'Lady of the Lake, 
(b) Cdtic Scotland, with special attention to Shakespeare s 
"Macbeth." Three units; first semester. (Dixon.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 87 

104. Political Institutions of the American Colonies. A 

study of the political life and institutions of the thirteen 
American colonies. Special attention given to the theories 

See SS c -° Cal f° vernment - Tw o ""its; first semester. 
See .Political Science 108. 

pir?- 3 " 1 P. ol . iticaI Institutions Under the Constitution. See 
com) nCe w0 units; second semester. (Mal- 

105. Church History. A course intended primarily for 
students ln the College of Theology; it covers the entirefield 
of the development of the mediaeval church, and the growth 
year (KnoTes.) denommatlons - Two ""its; through out the 

108-09. Renaissance andi Reformation. A study of the 
Renaissance as it affected European life and thought, with 
specml reference to artistic, literary, and political features 

noHtSt °r at i ,0n aS * *? e £ ed the reIi S ious - economfc, and 
political development of Europe. Open to well qualified 
Sophomores. Three units; first semester. (Klingberg) 

1789°isiT he A F K ei?C f h Re . voluti 5> n and the Napoleonic Empire, 
1789-1815. A brief review of the Ancient Regime followed 
by a study of the political, social, and internatfonal aspeTof 
the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire Three 
units; second semester. (Klingberg.) 

. m \. Eu J°P e f Since the Congress of Vienna. A course cov- 
ering the development of Europe from the close of the nI- 

fhtjeTr .^Klin^rg.f 686 " ^ ^° "^ thro °* & 

^^n^^XJl^^SS^ M ° dern RuSSia - 

112. Asiatic Studies, (a) The founding of British Rule 

and Hasdnts "ft T^l ^I'T t0 *£ careers of Sive 
nf th* PfcT g ■ ( } , 6 . S P anlsh Conquest and Government 
of the Philippines and the recent American Occupation (c) 
The Portuguese in As.a, with special attention to the epic of 
£S n % T- hC , Lus , iads -" W) Mohammedan India? P w ith 
E K^ nUOn *? th^^eer and policy of Akbar. Each Two 
units; both semesters. (Dixon.) 

113. China. See Oriental Studies, No. 105. 

th" oriiMS institutional History. An examination into 
tne origin and the evolution of the English Constitution 

feot tU o r ffe're r d ea fn n 1 S 917 an ,8 reP T 0rtS - P ™^*»V courseTorl 
(Klingberg) Tw ° UmtS; th roughout the year. 

*r£t f . En S lish Economic and Social History. A course cov- 

earlst time < s n ?n mi t C Ii and S ° dal h ^ t0ry of E ^ land "Jm The 
earnest times to the present. Prerequisite course 1 or 2 
Three units; first semester. (Klingberg) 



88 University of Southern California 

11* Pacific Slope History. A special lecture course be- 

,«.t; > h %f»af fo f„^ t S" ou , a This course is designed 

America, As.a, Africa, and Australia. ^^ , opinrat c { 

year. (Klingberg.) 

118. Parties and Governments in Europe. See Political 
Science 101. ,. . , 

110 Greek History. A critical study of the conditions of 
G S iSTaid "hSSt, Pf«n f -carefu 1 stud£ of the evolu- 
tion of political and social institutions. Lectures p p ^ 

T20.' Roman History. A series of inve ^Hons into the 
genesis, growth, and organization o the F^man State w^ 

^P^^"^ ^^^S Sent ^d 
leached t1^,M^ Earl.) 

121. World Preparation for Christianity A ^course ^ dealj 

JaiSSS to lT sKf of jSU%^* Clrisuanity 
emerged Two units; first semester. (Knole .) 

131. Lectures on the War Fundarnenta Cause His- 
torical Background, and War Aims. Thej £ urs « " ent for 
such special topics as the German i bioUpg^cal arg Miiitar _ 
war; the Idea of the German Mission £ tne JV th ^ Alsace . 
ism Germany's effort to ™al .the English navy, 
Lorraine problem; the. grouping of the gre^atPO 
alliances; commercial rivalry; the Morocco , c.r ^ German 
dad Railway and the ''Middle Europe /^ e e< £ ustr0 . S erbian 
Social classes included tn the war party, tw a fof 

controversy, Germany's objects, Germany s ^Kesp . j ion8 
the war, Examples of German Ruthlessness an Amef _ 

of International Law. The United States ,m tn w Ae 
ican war aims. Lectures based on Syllabus p ^ P 
United States Committee on Public Information, 
second semester. (Klingberg.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 89 

201. Historiography. A critical and comparative study of 
the leading historians, chiefly of the nineteenth century, their 
materials, methods of investigation and presentation, with 
a general consideration of the development of modern his- 
torical writing. One unit; throughout the year. (Kling- 
berg.) 

216. American Government. See Political Science No. 
200. 

220. Teachers' Course. A course for those who are plan- 
ning to secure a High School Teachers' Recommendation. A 
discussion of the teaching of history in secondary schools, 
including criticism of textbooks and the uses of the library 
for high school students. Two units; either semester. 
(Knoles.) 

222. The History Seminar. The purpose of the Seminar 
is to improve the method of study of history; to give train- 
ing in historical method and criticism; to assist students in 
doing constructive work. As a guide to the study of method, 
Langlois & Seignobos' "Introduction to the Study of His- 
tory" is used. In 1917-18 the major portion of the time was 
given to the study of the growth of Democracy in England 
and America. Each student must show ability to do thor- 
ough research work. Two units; throughout the year. 

Major Work: Thirty semester units, one-half of which 
must be in upper division courses. 

Minor Work: Ten units, including at least four in upper 
division courses. 

High School Teachers' Recommendation: Six units each 
of Ancient, Mediaeval, Modern, English, and American His- 
tory, courses 216 and 220. 

ITALIAN 

EDGAR M. VON FINGERLIN, Professor 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Elementary Italian Grammar. Readings from Modern 
Writers. Goldoni's Comedies, Composition. Three units; 
throughout the year. 

2. Romanticism and Pessimism. Alessandro Manzoni, 
Giacomo Leopardi, Silvio Pellico. Two units; throughout 
the year. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Dante, Petarca, Tasso. Literature: Italian Patriots 
as Writers. Two units; both semesters. Throughout these 
courses the Italian Language will be used as much as pos- 
sible with particular emphasis upon the Roman pronuncia- 
tion. 



90 University of Southern California 

JOURNALISM 

ERNEST JEROME HOPKINS, JAMES MAIN DIXON, Professors 
VINCENT MORGAN, JESSE RAY MILLER, Instructors 

1 News and Newswriting. Basis of practical journalistic 
work. Four or eight laboratory periods weekly, gathering 
Md writing of news, interviews, feature articles; individual 
criticism. One lecture weekly, the modern newspaper: 
sources of news, staff organization, and duties; : mechanical 
processes, news problems. Three or five umts; first semes- 
ter. (Hopkins.) _ . 

2. Development of Newswriting. Continuation of Course 
1. Four or eight laboratory periods weekly One lecture 
weekly, history of American journalism and lives of great 
journalists. Three or five units; second semester. (Hop- 
's!' Copyreading and Editing. Work of the copydesk Re- 
vision and heading of copy; proofreading; mamMof 
"style sheet;" principles of makeup;, editing of small publi 
cation. Two or four laboratory periods weekly, in connec 
tion with Course 1; one recitation weekly on basi . o text- 
book. Two or three units; either semester. (Hopkins) 

5. Advertising. Theory and practice of commercial pub- 
licity Writing of advertising copy; psychological principles 
of advertising! typography. Preparation of an advertising 
campaign. Two units; first semester. 

6. Newspaper Advertising. Detailed study of this special 
advertising medium; practical work in connection with The 
Trojan." Circulation and advertising rates. Work of the 
solicitor, advertising agency, newspaper service bureau, two 
units; second semester. Not given 191/-18. 

8. Typography and Printing. Laboratory course in the 
mechanics of printing, with occasional lectures Typesetting 
orintins folding, binding; study of type-faces, advertising 
composition, hafmony in display. One unit; either semester. 
Not given 1918-19. (Miller.) " 

11 Newspaper Administration. Business aspect ot tne 
daily and country weekly. Records and accounting . systems; 
costfinding, circulation and advertising methods, the news 
paper budget. Not giv#n 1918-19. ... , 

12. Newspaper Law. Legal privileges and limitations of 
the American newspaper. Libel and slander; posta 1 regula- 
tions; censorship; advertising laws; copyright Property 
rights in news. One unit; first semester. Not given 1918-19. 
(Morgan.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Advanced News and Feature Writing A practical 
course in the writing of magazine articles— fact-stories ot 



The College of Liberal Arts 91 

people and events, interviews, editorials, critical and analyti- 
cal reviews Study of leading magazines and the magazine- 
market. Three units; first semester. (Hopkins.) 

101. Specialized Writing. Particular attention to the 
country newspaper, class periodical, and trade journal 
Inree units; second semester. (Hopkins.) 

102. Comparative Journalism. Study and contrast of va- 
rious American and European newspapers, their makeup 
styles of writing, standards of news valuation, policies! 
Writing of analytical reports, also articles in various styles 
Two units; first semester. (Hopkins.) ' 

103. Current Events and the Editorial. Summaries of 
news local, American and foreign; class discussions. Writ- 
ing of one editorial a week. Discussion-class open to lower- 
division students for one unit of credit. Two units; second 
semester. (Hopkins.) 

105. Literary Laws of Editing. Growth of position of 
editor; rise, development and types of periodical literature, 
British and American; editing of a classic; book reviewing. 
Iwo units; second semester. (Dixon.) 

107. History of Journalism. Beginnings and growth of 
the press; its development in America. Lives of the great 
journalists. In alternating years with Course 137. (Hop- 

108. Seminar. Individual work in writing or special in- 
vestigation of topic. Hours for consultation to be arranged 
Une, two or three units; either semester. (Hopkins.) 

137. The Newspaper as a Social Institution. The point 
ot view is sociological. Objective survey of the American 
newspaper in its relation to American life and thought- 
psychology of journalism; leadership of ' the press; journal- 

19^°^^)^ UnUS; SeC ° nd SemeSten Not * iven 
200. Reviewing and the Higher Journalism. Rise of re- 
views, critical journals, quarterlies and magazines. Book- 
making as an art; indexing. Special attention to problems 
involved in structural element of the Master's thesis. Two 
units; either semester. (Dixon.) 

r^t T i W0 lV, Twent y um ' ts ^ Journalism, including 
Courses 1 and 2 (or equivalent); 3 and 102 or 103. Ten units 
in either English Economics or Sociology, not including 
Course 1 in any of those subjects. Journalism majors take 
minor work in one of these three departments not included 
in the major. 

Minor Work: ..Ten units. Courses, 1, 2, 102 and 103 are 
suggested. Economics, Sociology, History and English 
Literature are of essential importance to Journalism stu- 
dents. Attention accordingly is called to the following 



92 University of Southern California 

courses- Principles of Sociology (100); Immigration and 
Africanization W Criminology (114) ^ Soc-1 P^hology 
H20V History of Social Thought (205), Contemporary 
Social Thought (206); Municipal Problems (101); Labor 
Problems (W2); History of Modern Europe (2); History of 
The United States (13a); Europe Since tk Con gr ss 
Vienna (111); Pacific Slope History (116), History ot tng 
lish Literature (20); Shakespeare (154, 154b, 154c). 

LATIN-AMERICAN DEPARTMENT 

K. T. FORRESTER, R. E. SCHULZ, F. J. KLINGBERG 

R. MALCOLM, Professors 

J. ZIEGNER-URIBURU, Special Lecturer 

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

1. Elementary Spanish. (See Spanish la and lb.) 

2. Advanced Spanish. (See Spanish 2 and 3.) 
4. Spanish Conversation. (See Spanish 5.) 

5*. Commercial Spanish. (See Spanish 5.) 
114. Current Events. (See Spanish 114.) . _ 

For courses in the Literature of Spain, see Spanish 106 

°106 Latin- American Literature. A general survey of the 
Soanish L terfture of South and Central America, Mexico 
and Cuba One unit; first semester. Not given in 1916-17. 

(U 107 bUr Latin-American Poets. A study of. the works of 
Ruben Dariotnd other poets of Latin-America. One unit, 
second semester. (Uriburu.) 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

ma The History of Spanish Possessions in South and 
Central AmeKX Mexico. Given, 1916-17, in connection 
with History 117. (Klingberg.) n 

110. International Law. (See Political Science 100.) One 
unit; second semester. (Malcom.) _ 

in T atin-American Government. A series of investiga- 
tl^J^£5£« of State and Municipal £™rnmen 
in the leading Latin-American Republics. Lectures, reaa 
ings and reports. Two units; throughout the year. See 
also History 130 and 135. 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

112 The Economic and Commercial Geography of Latin- 
America: Intended primarily for those who intend to enter 



The College of Liberal Arts 93 

into the professional field of Latin-America. Social condi- 
tions will also be considered. One unit; first semester 
Given in English. (Uriburu.) 

< 113. Trade Relations. Intended primarily for those who 
intend to take up trade relations with Latin-America. One 
unit; second semester. Given in English. (Uruburu.) 

MATHEMATICS 

PAUL ARNOLD, Professor 
HUGH C. WILLETT, Associate Professor 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

| 1. Theory of Algebra. A lecture and text book course 
in which emphasis is placed principally upon the theory and 
the development of algebra. This course includes a review 
of elementary algebra, special attention being given to proofs 
of fundamental laws and principles. Three units; both semes- 
ters. (Arnold.) 

2. Solid and Spherical Geometry. The fundamental prop- 
ositions of the Euclidean geometry of space; Three units- 
first semester. (Willett.) 

■ 3. Trigonometry. Plane trigonometry and its applica- 
tions, and logarithms. Three units; second semester 
(Willett.) 

4. Algebra. Mathematical induction, equivalent equations, 
surds and complex numbers, theory of quadratic equations, 
simultaneous quadratic and higher equations, ratio, propor- 
tion, variation, the progressions and other simple series, ine- 
qualities, permutations and combinations, the binomial 
theorem for any exponent, limits and infinite series, deter- 
minants, the theory of equations. Two units; both semesters. 
(Willett.) 

5. Advanced Trigonometry. This course is planned par- 
ticularly for engineering students, and includes a review of 
Diane trigonometry, as well as a thorough study of the funda- 
mental' principles of spherical trigonometry and the applica- 
tion pf its formulas to the solution of spherical figures. Pre- 
requisite, course 3 or entrance trigonometry. Two units; 
irst semester. (Arnold.) 

6. Plane Analytic Geometry. The analytic geometry of 
:he straight line, the circle, and the conic sections, including a 
liscussion of the general equation of the second degree and 
Jome special examples in higher loci. Five units; second 
iemester. (Arnold, Willett.) 



94 University of Southern California 

7 Differential Calculus. Development of the fundamental 
orinciples and formulas, and applications to various prob- 
lems?,! geometry and analysis. Three un.ts; first semester. 
(Arnold.) 

UPPER DIVISION AND GRADUATE COURSES 

108 Integral Calculus. The general principles of the in- 
tegra calculus are developed, and the usual applications made 
^centers of gravity, to moments of inertia, and especially 
to geometry. Three units; second semester. (Arnold.) 

111 Analytical Mechanics. The mathematical treatment 
of statics, kinematics, and dynamics. Prerequisite, courses/ 
and 108. Three units, first semester; two units, second semes- 
ter. (Lawrence.) 

112 Descriptive Astronomy. A general course, requiring 
on 1 ly 2 -the D m C ath ? ematics of courses 1-3. Open to students i m 
the last two years of college course. Two units, nrst sem 
ester. (Lawrence.) 

209. Advanced Analytic Geometry and Differ^tW Equa- 
tions. The analytic geometry is a continuation of course 6 
arid includes a brief course in analytic geometry ot three 
dimensions 6 The course in differential equations >* elemen- 
tary and open to students who have taken course 108. Two 
units; both semesters. (Arnold.) 

210 Teachers' Course. Lectures on teaching mathemat- 
ics and lectures 8 giving a review of elementary mathematics 
from the standpoint of preparing teachers for sec ondary 
schools. The history of mathematics is also studied. Two 
units; both semesters. (Arnold.) 

Major Work. Thirty semester units. 

Minor Work. Ten units, including 7 and 108. 

High School Teachers' Recommendation. Courses 1-7, 
108, 112, 209, 210. 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

LEWIS M. KOEHLER, WM. RALPH LAPORTE, 
ALBERT B. ULREY, Professors 

During the past year Military Drill has been required of 
all lower division men and the classes noted below have 
been Tonducted. Just as the Year Book is going to press 
Se following telegram, authorizing the establishment of the 
Reserve Officers Training Corps, was received: 



The College of Liberal Arts 95 

Washington, D. C, 
April 13, 1918, P. M. 9:53. 
Dr. George F. Bovard, 

President, University of Southern California, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Bulletin drafted this date establishing infantry unit senior 
division R. O. T. C. your institution. 

McCAIN (Adjutant General.) 

In accordance with this authorization full work will be 
immediately organized and various courses will be available 
in the Summer Session, and in the regular session beginning 
in September. 

1. Military Science and Tactics. Company and Battalion 
drill. Required of all freshman and sophomore men. Two 
liours per week, one unit; throughout the year. 

2. Officers School. Required of all Commissioned and 
Non-Commissioned officers of the Battalion. 

10. Personal Hygiene. See Physical Education 10, two 
units; first semester. (Ulrey.) 

11. Sanitary Science. See General Biology 2. Two units- 
second semester. (Ulrey.) , ' 

16. First Aid to the Injured. See Physical Education lb. 
Iwo units; second semester. (LaPorte.) 
See also the various courses in Civil Engineering. 

MUSIC 

Students who take harmony and theory or advanced in- 
strumental or vocal work in the College of Music may be 
allowed College credit for the same, but the credit shall in 
no case exceed fifteen semester units, and will be given only 
upon the recommendation of the Dean of the College of 

ORATORY 

ELIZABETH YODER, Professor 

GERTRUDE COMSTOCK, EVA M. SMITH, CLOYDE DUVAL 

DALZELL, ALICE O. HUNNEWELL, Assistant Professors 

1. Fundamentals of Common Reading. Consideration of 
the natural vocal principles governing the intelligent inter- 
pretation of the printed page. Two units; either semester. 
.Limited to twenty-two. 



96 University of Southern California 

5. Public Speaking. Consideration of the various forms 
of public address, with platform exercise throughout the 
course. Rapid formulation of thought and its effective pres- 
entation are required. Two units; throughout the year. 

101. Art of Interpretation. A study of the art principles 
involved in the interpretation of literature. Two units; 
throughout the year. (Prerequisite course 1.) 

102. Shakespeare. Plays are considered with reference 
to the vocal interpretation. Two units; throughout the year. 
(Prerequisite course 1.) 

104. Argumentation and Debate. A practical training in 
methods of argument; brief drawing; practice debate. Two 
units; second semester. 

200. Interpretation. Lectures on technique of the speak- 
ing voice and interpretation of literature; oral practice on 
selections from masterpieces. Two units; second semester. 
(Open only to candidates for teacher's certificates.) 

Not to exceed fifteen units from the above courses may be counted 
toward the A. B. degree. 



ORIENTAL STUDIES AND COMPARATIVE 
LITERATURE 

JAMES MAIN DIXON, JOHN HEDLEY, J. G. HILL, 

ROY MALCOLM, Professors 

K. J. INUI, Lecturer in Japanese Sociology 

S. SAKAI, Instructor in the Japanese Language 

1. Japanese History and Civilization. Early Japan. Japan 
as the pupil of Korea and China. Influence of Buddhism. 
The rise of feudalism and of the Shogunate. The century of 
foreign intercourse. The later centuries of Tokugawa isola- 
tion and centralization. The Mejii era. Problems of today. 
Two units; first semester. (Dixon.) 

2. Chinese History and Civilization. The successive dy- 
nasties of the great empire. Foreign relations during the 
last few centuries. Founding of the republic. Problems of 
today. Two units; first semester. (Hedley.) 

3. Philippine History and Civilization. The conquest of 
the islands in the sixteenth century; intercourse with China 
and Japan in early times; the Spanish occupation; the Ameri- 
can teacher at work; the industrial future of the islands. 
Two units; second semester. (Dixon.) 

5. The Japanese Colloquial. Chinese ideographs and Jap- 
anese syllabaries. Romaji transliteration. Grammar of the 
spoken language, with exercises. Two units; second semes- 
ter. (Sakai.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 97 

6. The Chinese Mandarin Language. One unit; first sem- 
ester. (Hedley.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

^'r, ° r u ie " tal Philosophies and Religions... (Philisophy 
and Psychology 146.) Two units; throughout the year 
(Dixon.) J 

During the first semester the philosophical systems, par- 
ticularly of Hindustan, will be studied. In the second semes- 
ter attention wil be devoted to the religions of Asia and the 
and educate? S confron t the Christian missionary 

102. Japanese Immigration. A study of the problems re- 
sulting from the meeting of two civilizations on the Pacific 
coast. Iwo units; summer session, 1918. (Inui.) 

thl°l\J he I " dust 5y Development of Japan. ..History of 
the cotton silk and other industries. Development of the 
northern island under American instruction. Osaka as a 
trade center. Banking methods. Problems in the newly 
acquired possessions. One unit; second semester. (Dixon.) 

H a l,W ^ Politica J Development of Japan. Mediaeval feu- 
dalism Tokugawa beaurecratic methods; modern Imperial- 
ism. Extra-terntoriality until 1898. Two units. (Dixon.) 

105 The Political Institutions of China. Two units- 
second semester. (Hedley.) ' 

106. International Law. (Political Science 100.) Two 
units; throughout the year. (Malcom.) 

107. The Wisdom Literature and Poetry of Israel. (Re- 
ligious Education 100.) Two units; first semester. (Hill.) 

12 1 f J 'T, T ,! ie ^ UHn I IdC \ S ° f *5 e Bible - ( Re 'igious Education, 
it.) Iwo units; throughout the year. (Hill.) 

»nA 9 \u Th % Messianic Hope. Its appearance in Mithraism 
and other Oriental religions; its development and fulfilment 
(Religious Education 112.) Two. units; second semester.' 

Lilp?;f,£f rsi ™ L Mff ^ re , and Persian Themes in English 

"<S M ^ 6 A Ru , b ^ ,y ^ , of ° mar Khayyam; Firdausi's 

Shah-Nameh;" Arnold's "Sohrab and Rustum." Two units- 

second semester. (Dixon.) ' 

• l l h ^ ixtee T nth . C entury Indiia. Arrival of the Portuguese 
in Southern India. Calicut and Goa. Careers of Vasco da 
%i m \?u Albu a uer que. Camoens' great epic, The Lusiads. 
Ihe Mohammadan empire of Babar and his successors. 
Characters and ideals of Akbar. Tennyson's Abkar's Dream 
iwo units; summer session, 1918. (Dixon) 



98 University of Southern California 

112 The Founding of British Rule in India. Careers and 
pol des rf ilrdClive* Warren Hastings ; Welles ey, Ben*nck 
and Dalhousie. Two units; summer session, 1918. (Dixor ; 

m Kinline's India. Bombay, Simla, Peshawar, Lahore, 
Calcuua and other localities, with their literary traditions. 

T n 4 Un problems o n f American Government in the Philippines. 
Edition; finance; agriculture; -amerce Development of 
reoresentative institutions. Two units. (Dixon.; 

116 Racial Psychology and Ethnology. See Religious 
Education 144. Two units; throughout the year. (Hill.) 

Maior Work. Thirty semester units, to be accompanied 
or^receded by the following courses: Religious Education 1, 
2 and 21. History 117, and Sociology 103. 

Minor Work. Ten semester units. 

PHARMACY 

The following courses in the College of Pharmacy may be 
offend as lowef division electives toward I the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts, up to a maximum of fifteen units. 

Junior Pharmacy • ; | units 

Senior Pharmacy ■ ^units 

Materia Medica ■'■ | un « 

Pharmacognacy 

In addition to the above fifteen units, the work in Chem- 
istry and Biology may be credited, unit for unit. 

PHILOSOPHY 

RALPH TYLER FLEWELLING, JOHN G. HILL, FESTUS E. 
OWEN, JAMES M. DIXON, Professors 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1 Elementary Logic. A study of the inductive and de- 

™=au?red Thiee unit.; first semester. (Owe.) 
,£dkd the evolution c/ the moral problem from pr.mttive 



The College of Liberal Arts 99 

life to the present is traced, a comparative study of current 
ethical theories is attempted, and some application of the 
results of these studies is made to present problems of in- 
dividual and social life. Two units; first semester (Hill) 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 



100 History of Philosophy. The leading systems of 
thought from the time of the early Greeks until the present 
(Fi r ewelHn tS ) ; throughout the y ear - °P en to Sophomores.' 

102. Theory of Thought and Knowledge. A consideration 
of the nature, origin and validity of knowledge, critical and 
constructive. Three units; first semester. (Flewelling.) 

103. Metaphysics. Treats of the main problems of phil- 
osophy, ttie theory of being, reality, self, the world, God, 
and the problem of evil. Three units; second semester 
(Me welling.) 

110. Personalism. A study of personality, as the founda- 
tion of perception and thought, and the ground of being 
with special reference to the system of Borden Parker 
Bowne. Two units; first semester. (Flewelling.) 

111. Personalism and the Problems of Philosophy. The 
relation of personalism to other philosophies, ancient and 
modern Presupposes course 110. Two units; second semes- 
ter. (Flewelling.) 

120. Theism and the Philosophy of Religion. A careful 
examination of toe leading theories offered in explanation of 
the ultimate nature of reality. A clear philosophy of religion 
is sought by a sympathetic study of the light which recent 
science sheds upon the problems of nature, man, and mind 
the texts used are Iverach and Bowne. Prerequisites, Phil- 
osophy 1. Two units; second semester. 

,J?h philosophy of the Christian Religion. An attempt to 
understand the genius of Christianity by a searching study of 
the teaching of Jesus as found in the original sources. See 
Religious Education 110. Two units; first semester. (Hill.) 
t 130 The Philosophy of Henri Bergson. The text used is 
Creative Evolution." This course seeks to understand the 
new philosophy of life-"vital impetus." Two units- first 
semester. Not offered, 1917-1918. ' 

140. Oriental Philosophers and Religions. Early Baby- 
onian and Persian philosophical thought, Hindu speculation, 
the Forest phi osop'hers of India, Buddhist philosophers 
Mahoniedan philosophers. The Ethics and intellectual activ- 
ities of China, Shmtoism and Bushido, Zen and other sects. 
Iwo units; throughout the year. (Dixon!) 



100 University of Southern California 

141. Philosophy of Education. (See Education 110-11.) 

142. Aesthetics. (See Education 107.) (Stowell.) 

ISO Philosophical Movements in Literature. Studies in 
the Greek philosophies of life and their reappearance in the 
ierSure^ diCent periods. Lectures, readings and themes. 
Two units; throughout the year. (Flewelhng.) 

151. Modern Philosophical Tendencies A study of the 
rise and development of modern philosophy. Lectures as 
fgned reading S P and themes. For advanced students. Two 
units; throughout the year. (Flewelhng.) 

Major Work. Thirty semester units. 

Minor Work. Ten semester units. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

WM. RALPH LAPORTE, Professor 
EDNA AGNES COCKS, Associate Professor 
DEAN CROMWELL, Director of f*"^*'*?? ?. TTEN . 
ALBERT B. ULREY (Hygiene, Physiology), SAMUEL RITTEN 
HOUSE (Anatomy), Professors 
D W POLLARD, Lecturer in Scouting 
CHESTER H. BOWERS, M. D., Medical Examiner < Men > 
ELSA H HORSTMAN, M. D., Lecturer in Hygxene, and Med.cal 
Examiner (Women) 
GRACE WITHERELL, Gymnasium In struct ° r 
TATTRA CRITTENDEN, Swimming Instructor (Women) 
CLARENCE U. BUTTERFIELD, JESSIE GRIEVE, ESTHER GRUA, 
Assistants 

olay leaders and recreation directors, ior sei v 

& institutions, clubs, playgrounds, Y. M. C. A., ana 

^aukement-* A minimum of four units Physical credit 

ssss »wo«s . s «% * rs v- as 



tures for women. 



The College of Liberal Arts 101 

women's director before securing their gymnasium suits. 
Men s suits consist of white running pants, sleeveless shirt 
supporter, and tennis shoes. 

Examinations: Every student upon entering the depart- 
ment is given a thorough physical and medical examination 
including strength tests, measurements, heart and lung tests, 
etc. On the basis of the examination special instruction and 
advise is given concerning the care of the body and the 
health. The examination must be taken before entering 
class work. & 

PRACTICAL 

1. General Gymnastics. A general course combining cor- 
rective, educational, hygienic, and recreational elements, and 
including graded exercises, light and heavy apparatus, games, 
and folk dances. Required of all freshmen. Two hours per 
week, one unit; throughout the year. 

2. Advanced Gymnastics. Open to students who have 
completed course 1 satisfactorily. Advanced apparatus, 
tumbling, gymnastic dancing, boxing, wrestling, fencing, 
lwo hours per week, one unit; throughout the year. 

■ 3. Corrective Gymnastics. Personal instruction and train- 
ing given to students whose condition prevents their partici- 
pation in the regular work. Required of all freshmen unfitted 
to take course 1. Two hours per week, one unit; throughout 

111c ycdr. 

t>u' ' ^t°? r S . ports ' Two of the four required units in 
Physical Education may be taken in outdoor sports, if the 
physical condition warrants. 

(a) Men. Football, track, basketball, baseball. 

hJEh»iF° m u n \ ?f nn{ *> ba ?ketball, hockey, indoor baseball, 
nandball, volleyball, and swimming. 

THEORETICAL 

w^°r, tC: o £" ° f . th ? folI ° wi ? g theor y courses are open to both men and 
women and count toward the required work. They may not be used 
to satisfy the four-unit requirement in Physical Education. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

10. Personal Hygiene. The course deals with the preser- 
vation and improvement of the health, care of the body etc 
Two units, first semester. 

(a) Men. See General Biology 1. (Ulrey.) 

(b) Women. (Horstman.) 



102 University of Southern California 

11 Sanitary Science. Public and private sanitation as re- 

Two units; second semester. 

(a) Men. See General Biology 2. (Ulrey.) 

(b) Women. (Horstman.) 

12 Physiology. A general study of the activities of liv- 
ing or»K with special attention given to the physiology 
of g the S hum"n body. Three units, second semester. (See 
Zoology 2.) (Ulrey.) 

IS Principles and History of Physical Education The 
underlying principles of Physical Education as applied to 
uiiucn.yin& F xr « . 4 ottention given to trie general 

An introduction to other courses in the department, 
units; first semester. (LaPorte.) 

ifi First Aid to the Injured. Emergency treatment of 

Porte.) 
?n Plaveround and Gymnastic Games. A study and 
< =;f n? Jarnl^for the Playground and Gymnasium. The 
analysis of games tor tne r ys e readings 

the needs of sehool. and PtarPO""* ■ ™« fer t h e "JoJ- 
snch a nature as to .nppty > S ijld Ipeeial attention 

ter. (Cocks.) • . 

semester. (Cocks.) # # 

110, without extra credit. 



The College of Liberal Arts 103 

26. Boy Scout Activities. Methods of organizing and 
conducting Scout troops; requirements including knot-tying 
PoHardT re " bullding ' cooking, first aid, etc. (LaPorte and 

27. Campfire Girls Activities. A study of the Campfire 
movement; its origin, purpose, methods, and activities. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

102. Recreation and Religion. Recreation as a prime 
element in religious education. Methods of organizing the 
home and church in a common plan of character training 
through play. Constructive play programs fop the city and 
rural church. A general recreation training course for re- 
ligious and social workers. Two units; second semester. 

104. Anatomy. Study and dissection of various types of 
lower animals, with collateral reading in human anatomy, 
t nlf 6 UI \ Sec semest er. (See Zoology 107.) (Rit- 

106. Physical Education Methods for Elementary Schools 

A course designed primarily for those preparing to teach 
Physical Education in the public schools. The work con- 
sists of practical training in handling classes in marching 
tactics, maze running, graded exercises, and popular games 

Ea'efnf u" IY sch t oolroom - Playground, and P gymnfs*um 
tach of the Elementary grades is taken up in turn with the 
proper adaptation of story plays, rhythmic games, folk 
dances, graded exercises, and graded games. Sample les- 
sons are taught under the direct supervision of the instruct- 
ors, and practice teaching in regular classes provided Two 
units; first semester. (LaPorte and Cocks.) 

107. Physical Education Methods for Secondary Schools. 

t^ tin " a * ,on °t course 106 which is prerequisite. Advanced 
Z P J a- At vanous act iy>ties mentioned in course 106 will 
fit the ulJl° m f * e standpoint of grading and organizing to 

S^S^)^ TW ° UnitS; --"-es^ 

thl° 9 ^ The0 7 °, f Play -, A Study of the n ature of the child, 
the nature- of play, and the function of play; pleasurable 
elements in games; criteria of the value of play? aims and 
T P ™ ln , th % condu ct of play; age and sex differences m^ay 
Two units; first semester. (LaPorte.) 



104 University of Southern California 

110 Plaveround Administration. History of the Play- 
ground movement; construction and equipment of a play- 

those desiring certificates. Two units; second semester. 
(LaPorte.) , . -. ., . . . 

ill Physiology of Exercise. A study of the direct ef- 
fects of exerdsf on health, considering movements, heat, 
combuftioT fatigue, breathlessness, exhaustion .overwork, 
training, etc. Two units; first semester. (LaPorte.) 

112 Kinesiology. A brief study of the anatomy of the 
motor orgTns wfth special reference to joint and muscular 
mechanism The relation of various sets of movements to 
musc™evelopment. Two units; first semester. (Cocks.) 
115 Anthropometry and Physical Examinations. A study 
of physical characteristics and their »fl« n « ^^^ J 
vidual- physical defects; simple tests for / bno . rma ' 1 ^ e i f,' 
methods Staking physical measurements, and testing heart, 
lungs, ears, eyes, etc. Prescription of exercise. Two units, 
second semester. (LaPorte.) 

120 Massage and Orthopedic Gymnastics. A study ot 

ond semester. (Cocks.) 

Maior Work: Thirty semester units, in addition to Phy- 
sical Eduction 1, 2, 4 and.15. The course .must include 0, 
Personal Hygiene; 11, Sanitary Science; 12, Phy 310 , 1 . ^'.. 1 ?'. 
Principles a^d History of Physical Education ; 16 s First .Aid 
22, Elementary Folk Dancing; 104, Anatomy; 106, E emen 
tarv Methods; 107, Secondary Methods; 109, theory oi rl *y> 
110 Playground Administration; and four units selected from 
11U, fiaygrounu ^u M aiors will a so take Chemistry 

rand /'they' do 'not present entrance credits in High 
School Chemistry and Physics) Chemistry 1 and Physics 1. 
Iw will t^ke at least six units in Education, covering the 

in Physical Education to insure proficiency in all torms oi 
gymnastics and athletics. 

Minor Work: Ten semester units, to be arranged. 

mmtmm 



The College of Liberal Arts 105 

Special Teacher's Certificates: The University is author- 
ized by the state to grant credentials which entitle the holder 
to a special certificate to teach Physical Education in the 
Public Schools. In addition to Physical Education and 
Training, the holder may also teach Play and Playground 
Management, athletics, gymnastics (and with the secondary 
certificate, Cadet Drill), and such Physiology, Anatomy, and 
Hygiene as are supplementary to a course in Physical Edu- 
cation^ These certificates are of two types and may be se- 
cured in the following manner: 

Elementary. The equivalent of the first three years of the 
major course outlined above; four units of practice teaching 
in Physical Education; at least twelve units in Education 
(including a teacher's course, and the four units of teaching); 
and sufficient extra units in Education, Biology, and other 
allied subjects to total forty-five units in Physical Education 
and the supplementary subjects combined. 

Secondary. A full major in Physical Education, covering 
four years work; other requirements the same as for the 
Elementary, except that the total work in Physical Educa- 
tion and allied subjects must be not less than sixty units. 

PHYSICS 

ARTHUR W. NYE, J. H. MONTGOMERY, Professors 

J. F. WILSON, Associate Professor 

LOREN T. CLARK, Instructor 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. General Elementary Physics. A course intended for 
those who have not studied high school physics. Lectures, 
recitations, demonstrations and laboratory exercises dealing 
with the principles and applications of physics. Recom- 
mended for non-technical students and those preparing for 
the study of medicine. Class work four hours per week, 
laboratory work three hours per week. Five units; through- 
out the year. (Nye and assistants.) 

■ 2. Mechanics. Lectures and recitations. Three units: 
nrst semester. (Wilson.) 

3. Mechanics. Laboratory course. Three hours during 
one afternoon of each week. One unit, first semester. (Nye.) 

4. Heat. Lectures and recitations. Two units: first sem- 
ester. (Nye.) 

5. Heat. Laboratory course. Three hours during one 
afternoon of each week. One unit: first semester. (Nye.) 

6. Electricity. Lectures and recitations. Three units; 
second semester. (Wilson.) 



106 University of Southern California 

7 Electricity. Laboratory course. Three hours during 
one afternoon of each week. One unit; second semester. 
(Nye.) 

8. Light. Lectures and recitations. Two units; second 
semester. (Nye.) 

9. Light. Laboratory course. Three hours during one 
afternoon of each week. One unit; second semester. (Nye.) 

Note— Courses 2 to 9, inclusive, require a knowledge of high school 
nhvsics and trfgonometry They are recommended for students pursuing 
Set Xal studies/ In the laboratory -courses . mstoiction 
sheets oreoared by the department are the basis for the work. Ihe ex 
feHmen P tal P work p^rformedV the students is *^**"j$ CT $$t? a 
Millikan's "Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat and f 1 " 1 " s 
-Laboratory Physics." Courses 3 and 5 may be taken comadently, half 
of the time 7 being spent on each, and half credit received. The same is 
true of Courses 7 and 9. 

16 Applied Electricity. A course in the principles and 
applications of electricity. Prerequisites, Physics 6. Two 
units; second semester. (Wilson.) 

17 Physical Measurements. Laboratory course to accom- 
pany 16. One unit; second semester. (Wilson.) 

21 Shop Work. Instruction in the use of wood and metal 
working tools and machinery, including cutting, filing, drill- 
me tapping, polishing, screw-cutting and elementary lathe 
wfrk Three or six periods in laboratory, one or two units, 
either semester. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

105 Electrical Measurements. A laboratory course in 
which the theory and methods of exact electrical determin- 
ation are taken up, including the determination of resistance 
by various methods, galvanometer constants the measure- 
ment of current and electromotive force, insulation tests, hys, 
Sresis and permeability tests, the calibration of instruments, 
the use of condensers, the measurement of Ruction etc Six 
periods per week. Two units; either semester. (Wilson ) 

106 Heat. Study of state changes, kinetic theory, radia- 
tion, 'and exact methods of experimental work. Two units; 
first' semester. (Nye.) 

107. Physical Measurements. To accompany course lUo. 
Two units; first semester. (Nye.) § 

108. Light. Geometrical optics, first semester. Physical 
optics, second semester. Two units. (Nye.) 

109. Physical Measurements. To accompany course 108. 
Two units; both semesters. (Nye.) 

110 Sound. General principles, theory of vowel sounds, 
construction of musical instruments, architectural acoustics. 
Two units; first semester. (Nye.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 107 

111. Physical Measurements. To accompany Course 110 
Two units; first semester. (Nye.) 

112. Photometry and Illumination. Lectures and recita- 
tions. A study is made of the physiological and physical 
phenomena of artificial illumination, methods of measure- 
ment, types of photometers', types of illuminants and their 
characteristics, reflectors, and the principles of interior and 
street illumination. Three units; first semester. (Nye.) 

113. Photometry. A laboratory course to accompany 
Physics 112. One or two units; first or second semester. 
(Nye.) 

114. Thermodynamics. A study of the laws of gases, heat 
cycles, temperature-entropy diagrams, pressure-volume dia- 
grams applied to gas, hot air and steam engines and refrig- 
erating machines. One unit; first semester. (Nye.) 

116. Radio-activity and Passage of Electricity Through 
Gases. Lectures and recitations. Two units; second semes- 
ter. (Montgomery.) Not given 1917-'18. 



GRADUATE COURSES 



206. Teacher s Course. Lectures and discussions of 
methods of presenting and teaching various parts of Physics 
and the equipment and management of the laboratory. Two 
units; second semester. (Nye.) 

Major Work: Twenty-four hours in Physics and ten hours 
in Electrical Engineering or Civil Engineering. 

Minor Work: Twelve units, including course 105. 

High School Teacher's Certificate. The candidate must 
complete courses 2 to 9, 21, 105, 114, 116, 206, courses in 
Mathematics, including the Calculus, elementary and ad- 
vanced courses in Chemistry and sufficient other courses in 
pure and applied Physics to demonstrate his ability to pur- 
sue methods of thinking and experimenting, which are in 
accord with present-day physical scientific investigation. 

For additional work in theoretical and applied Physics see 
courses in Civil and Electrical Engineering. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

ROY MALCOM, FRANK J. KLINGBERG, JAMES MAIN DIXON 

TULLY C. KNOLES, Professors 

JOHN HEDLEY, K. S. INUI, Lecturers 

HARRY J. McCLEAN, Instructor 

JOHN E. HARLEY, MARY CHAFFEE, Assistants 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Introduction to Political Science. The historic origin 
ot political science; theories of the State; the nature of sov- 



108 University of Southern California 

ereignty the structure and province of government. Lec- 
tures, reading, reports. Two units; throughout the year. 
(Malcom.) 

2. Elementary Law. A study of elementary law, involv- 
ing the use of a text book, lectures, cases, and special read- 
ings Designed specially for those students who, though not 
intending to enter the legal profession, desire to have an 
elementary knowledge of law. Two hours; throughout the 
year. (McClean.) 

3. Political Conditions in the Philippines. (Dixon.) See 
Oriental Studies 3. 

4. Japan's Foreign Relations. A study of Japan's inter- 
course with China and the West, particularly with the United 
States. Two units; first semester. (Inui.) 

UPPER DIVISION AND GRADUATE COURSES 

100. International Relations. The nature, ^e 3 .and 
principles of International Law; the influence of Christian 
civilization upon rules. Special attention is given to The 
Sue Conferences of 1899 and 1907. Lectures, readings, and 
study of cases. Two units; throughout the year. (Malcom.) 

101 Parties and Governments in Europe. A series of 
Stuaes in the field of the comparison of the different methods 
of government in actual practice in the various states of 
Europe. Lectures, readings and reports. Two units, 
throughout year. (Knoles.) 

102. Political and Social Institutions of Japan. A study 
of political social, religious and educational evolution ot 
jlp^n and discussion of the reasons for Japanese progress, 
colonization and emigration. Two units; first semester. (Inui). 

103. The Industrial Development of Japan. History of 
the cotton, silk, and other industries Development of ^the 
northern island under American instruction. Osaka as a 
trade center' Banking methods. Problems in the newly 
acquired possessions. One unit; second semester. (Dixon.) 

104 European Expansion in Asia with special reference 
to French and Dutch methods of Colonization. Two units, 
throughout the year. (Klingberg.) See History U7. 

105. The Political Institutions of China. Two units; sec- 
ond semester. (Hedley.) 

106 The Government of England, Colonial Government, 
and S^lf Government within the British Empire. Two units; 
throughout the year. (Klingberg.) 

107. Municipal Problems. Three units; first semester. 
(Hunt.) See Economics 101. 



The College of Liberal Arts 109 

108. Political Institutions of the American Colonies. A 

study of the political life and institutions of the thirteen 
American Colonies. Special attention given to the theories 
and practice of local government. Lectures, readings re- 
ports. Two units; first semester. (Malcom.) 

108a. Political Institutions under the Constitution. A 

study of the social and political institutions under the Con- 
stitution. 1787-1914. Lectures, readings, reports, Two units- 
second semester. (Malcom.) 

111. Sixteenth Century India. Arrival of the Portuguese 
m Southern India. Calicut and Goa. Careers of Vasco de 
^u m ?/u d Albu q uer Q u e. Camoens' great epic, The Lusiads. 
Ine Muhammadan empire of Babar and his successors Char- 
acter and political ideals of Akbar. Tennyson's Akbar's 
Dream. Two units; Summer session, 1917. (Dixon.) 

I 12 .' T1 ? e JF? undin S o f British Rule in India. Careers and 
policies of Clive, Hastings, Wellesley, Dalhousie and Ben- 
tinck. Two units; second seemster. (Dixon.) 

115. Latin-American Government. A series of investiga- 
tions into the workings of State and Municipal government 
in the leading Latin-American Republics. Lectures read- 
ings, and reports. Two units; throughout the year/ 

200. American Government. A study of municipal, state 
and national government in actual operation. Special atten- 
tion given to the practical administration of government 
Lectures, reports, and special investigations. Three units- 
throughout the year. (Malcom.) See also History 216. 

Major Work. Thirty semester units, one-half of which 
must be in upper division courses. In meeting the require- 
ments for the major, courses may be chosen, with the ap- 
proval of the department, from other fields, particularly the 
fields of History and Economics. In addition to the regular 
lectures and classroom work addresses are given, from time 
to time, by men and women who are engaged in the actual 
administration of government. 

i Minor Work. Ten semester units, including at least four 
in upper division courses. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

FESTUS E. OWEN, Professor 

1. General Psychology. A textbook in psychology. Lec- 
tures, collateral reading, classroom demonstrations, supple- 
mentary elementary experimental work. Three units- first 
semester. (Owen.) ' 



1 1 University of Southern California 

2. Elementary Experimental Psychology. The purpose 
of the course is to acquaint the student with the method* 
of laboratory psychology, thus preparing him for advanced 
experimental work and at the same time giving him a more 
intimate knowledge of the facts and principles of general 
psychology. Three units. (Owen.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100 The Psychology of Thinking. An investigation of 
the conditions and laws of effective thinking with applications 
to methods of study and of teaching. Three units; second 
semester. (Owen.) 

101. Abnormal Psychology. A study is made of dreams, 
hallucinations, hysteria, hypnotism, telepathy, spiritism, mul- 
tiple personality, mental healing, the subconscious, and kin- 
dred topics. The aim is to discover the underlying prin- 
ciples of abnormal mental processes and to correlate them 
with the normal psychic activities. Two units; first semester. 
(Owen.) 

102. Spcial Psychology. (See Sociology 120). (Bogardus.) 

103. The Psychology of Religion. See Religious Educa- 
tion 145. (Hill.) 

104 Applied Psychology. An outline study of the appli- 
ca ions of psychology to the problems of mental measure- 
ment vocational guidance, advertising salesmanship, and 
health. Two units; second semester. (Owen.) 

105. Genetic Psychology. A study of the genesis and evo- 
lution of conscious processes and behavior. Types of animal 
behavior, racial and individual development. Two units; sec- 
ond semester. (Owen.) 

108. Racial Psychology and Ethnology. (Religious edu- 
cation 144); two units. (Hill.) 

109 Experimental Education. Laboratory study of the 
processes involved in learning with applications to the prob- 
lems of teaching. Two units; first semester. (Owen.) 

110. Educational Psychology. The general Psychology of 
the learning processes with applications to problems of the 
teacher and the learner. Child development, problem of the 
exceptional child, mental measurements, moral education. 
Three hours; second semester. (Owen.) 

Major Work: Thirty units, to include Logic, three units, 
and History of Philosophy. Six units. 

Minor Work: Ten units, exclusive of course 1. 



The College of Liberal Arts 1 | 1 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

JOHN G. HILL, J. H. MONTGOMERY, Professors 

G. BROMLEY OXNAM, Assistant Professor 

JOHN HEDLEY, Lecturer 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. The Pentateuch and Other Historical Books of the Old 
Testament. The origin, history, tradition, cosmology, morals 
laws, government, and religious philosophy of the Hebrews 
from Abraham to Solomon will be considered. The ques- 
tions of date, authorship, purpose, plan, style of literary com- 
position and ruling ideas of each book will be studied. Two 
units; first semester. (Hill.) 

2. The Prophetic and Chronicle Books of the Old Testa* 
ment. This course will survey the varied and swiftly chang- 
ing periods of Hebrew history from the close of the United 
Kingdom to the end of Old Testament times. The greatest 
stress will be laid upon the study of the prophets; their 
unique place and power, their relation to state and Church 
their distinctive messages and permanent contribution to the 
history of religion. Two units; second semester. (Hill.) 

3. The Bible as Literature. ^A survey course covering the 
entire Biblical field from the literary point of view. The 
great epics, lyrics, dramas, biographies, essays are studied 
with a view to exact knowledge and correct interpretation 
ot them. The necessary historical background is included 
Iwo units; first semester. (Not given 1917-18.) 

4. Israel's Social Institutions. The evolution of the He- 
brew family, tribe and state, including a study of Semitic 
origins The course is designed to give the student knowl- 
edge of the customs of the Semitic peoples, in order to un- 
derstand better the references to them in the Scriptures 
Laws of marriage, blood revenge, sacrifice, resident aliens 
are noted and the .social and democratic ideals of the Old 
Testament caref u li y collated. Two units; second semester. 
(Not given 1917-18.) 

5. Social Application of Biblical Principles. The origin 
and development of Hebrew moral principles; an intensive 
study of moral codes of the Old Testament, the teaching of 
the prophets and the principles of Jesus. The testing of 
these principles in modern social, industrial, political and 
^nT U %i e -T,It h \ pra , Ctical a PPlication-of the social de- 
mands of the Bible by the Church and allied religious forces 
ot today. Two hours; first semester. (Oxnam.) 

10. The Apostolic Age of the New Testament. This 
course is a careful^ survey of the Apostolic Church of the 
first century, its origin, its strange success, its baneful con- 



1 1 2 University of Southern California 

Utt, wi.h Judaism, its S-g«*J '^"goft, "1 
its new life in 'JV^IeS "mes »d John and of theft 

ment. A study of the lite teacning, > ag geen 

cial emphasis is laid upon th ft V™ ^S^unt in sharp con- 
Sy»*r- P h . e 8 a S n r So°u" ^ Two units; seeoud 

semester. (Hill.) 

tory of texts; apocrayphal books sketch o ^ R ^ & 

torical criticism; use of Bible m JJ 1 ^ . through Middle 

^.^"fiutfs^S S a f, — -• * 

Two hours; second semester. (Uxnam.; 

?1 The Genesis of Missions. A study of the nature, um- 
vefsklit^nS^rpose of reign, »^ ^Pa™on J CJr»j 
tianity with the ^-^f^^lo^n world, with spe- 
Christiamty thr ? u g ho t u V! h p %VSties which confronted the 
cial attention given to the diftculties wn move . 

early church; followed by a survey o^ the m y^^ 

ments which resulted in the winning semester. 

Lectures, reports, and readings. Iwo units, n 



Pietists and Moravians to P"""^^; fn its world-wide 
tions, followed by a. study of Ch ristian ity in ^^ 

reach. Lectures, assignments and paper, 
semester. (Hedley.) 

lems, methods and results, (b) e»J conditions, and a 
the rapid rise of Japan out of the teuaai cm » mh _ 

Sf *>*5fflRS?«»f SSS of the Christian 



The College of Liberal Arts 1 1 3 

forces in the Philippines and the Pacific Island groups. Two 
units; first semester. (Hedley.) 

24. Missions in India, Moslem Lands, Africa and Spanish- 
America, (a) The awakening of India. A study of the his- 
tory of the Indian peoples, followed by a survey of Christian 
missions, their problems and work, (b) The Mohammedan 
World. A study of Mohammedanism as a force in the world 
today. Special use is made of the Koran, (c) The Redemp- 
tion of Africa. A study of the physical and racial problems 
and of the pagan peoples, (d) The Rise of Spanish-America. 
A study of the aboriginal races of the Americas, the Spanish 
conquest, the colonial and war periods, and present-day strug- 
gles in South America and Mexico. This course is concluded 
by a study of the history and problems of Protestant mis- 
sions. Two units; second semester. (Hedley.) 

30. Church History. Given in Maclay College of Theol- 
ogy. Two units. (Knoles.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Israel's Wisdom Literature. An advanced course in 
the wisdom literature of the Testaments, together with the 
study of fragments from the Apocrypha. Comparison is 
made with Egyptian, Babylonian and Greek literature. Two 
units; second semester. (Hill.) 

101. Israel's Poetic Literature. A study of the structure 
and interpretation of the poetic writings of the Semitic peo- 
ples with chief emphasis upon the Old Testament. Two 
units; second semester. (Knopf.) 

110. The Teachings of Jesus in the Gospel. A critical 
Study of Jesus' utterances as to his authority, ruling ideas, 
ethical claims, social program, growing self-consciousness, 
and views on sin, salvation, death, the future, etc. Three 
units; first semester. (Hill.) 

111. New Testament Doctrines and Institutions. A series 
of inductive studies in the New Testament records (Gospels 
and Epistles) to determine the meaning and content of doc- 
trines, institutions, and types found therein. Not given in 
1917-18. Two units; second semester. (Hill.) 

112. Messianism. A study of the appearance and devel- 
opment of the Messianic Hope in the ancient world. Egyp- 
tian, Babylonian, Persian, Hebrew and other Oriental reli- 
gions are considered. A critical appreciation of Christianity 
as the final expression and fulfillment of this hope is in- 
cluded. Two units; throughout the year. (Hill.) 



] ] 4 University of Southern California 

113. New Testament Exegesis. Given in Maclay College 
of Theology. Two hours; throughout the year. (Healy.) 

114 Social and Ethical Teachings of the Prophets and of 
Tesus. First semester; a study of the prophetic writers with 
reference to their social and ethical ideals, special problems, 
changing creeds, opposing parties and varied institutions. 
Second semester; a comparative study of the. social and ethi- 
cal ideals of Jesus, Paul and John, and their bearing upon 
modern social movements. Not given 1917-18. Two hours; 
throughout the year. (Hill.) 

115 The Book of Revelation and Other Apocalyptic Lit- 
erature. A study of the origin, purpose, nature and content 
of Apocalyptic writings found in Daniel, Ezekiel and. other 
Old Testament prophetic books, with special emphasis laid 
on John's revelation in the New Testament. Two hours; 
first semester. Not given 1917-18. (Hill.) 

116 The Epistle to the Hebrews and the Catholic Epistles. 

A study of this group of New Testament books, as regards 
their origin, purpose, contents, teachings, and general rela- 
tion to other N. T. writings. Two hours; second semseter. 
Not given 1917-18. (Hill.) 

120. Religious Pedagogy. A course designed to fit the stu- 
dent for teaching Bible classes in Sunday Schools teacher- 
training courses, etc. The teacher, his work, qualifications 
and preparation; the student, his physical, mental and moral 
nature; the lesson; the teacher's approach to the student; etc. 
Two units; first semester. (Montgomery.) 

121. The Modern Organization of the Church. The Sun- 
day School, Young People's Societies, various types of church 
organization; duties of various officers, committees, etc. A 
course designed to fit for more efficient lay service in the 
church. Two units ;*>econd semesetr. (Montgomery.) 

130 The Early English Bible. The Gospels and Psalms in 
West Saxon. For description see announcement of the Col- 
lege of Theology. Two units; throughout the year. (Dixon.; 

140. Charities. See Sociology 104. Two units; second 
semester. (Kenngott.) 

141. Social Ethics. See Sociology. Two units; through- 
out the year. (Kenngott.) 

142. The Social Message of the Gospel. The moral basis 
of the social question; Christ's estimate, of life; the social 
ideals of the Kingdom. Various social institutions are ex- 
amined to see if they conform to the Kingdom ideals. The 



The College of Liberal Arts 1 1 5 

lines of co-operation and leadership of the church are indi- 
cated. Two units; second semester. (Montgomery.) 

144. Racial Psychology and Ethnology. A study of 
Races; their antiquity, distribution, classification, relative 
levels, mental traits, divergent development, as seen in their 
ethnic customs, comparative religions, ethics, arts, folk-lores, 
literatures, and philosophies. Invaluable to those intending 
to do home or foreign missionary work, social settlement 
work, and educational work in the United States. Two 
hours; throughout the year. (Hill.) 

145. Psychology of Religion, see Psychology 103. 

146. The Development of Religion. A study of the typical 
forms of religion; the origin of religion; a comparison of the 
fundamental concepts of various faiths; the practical results 
as social agents; a comparison of Christianity with other 
religious. Two units. Not offered 1917-1918. (Montgomery.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

200. The Religious Education Seminar. Discussion of im- 
portant topics, book reviews, investigation of various prob- 
lems. One unit; throughout the year. 

201. Seminar in the Relation of Religion to Social Ques- 
tions. See Sociology 201. Two units; throughout the year 
(Kenngott.) 

t Secretarial Course. Designed to fit for secretarial work 
in Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations 
and similar organizations. This is a three-year course lead- 
ing to a certificate, by taking a fourth year and satisfying 
the complete major requirements the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts may be secured. The following courses are required: 

™ «- . ^ « . Units 

Religious Education, 1, 2, 10, 11, 21, 30, 110 

120, 121, 140, 141 32 to 42 

Sociology, 100, 101, 103, 106, 118 15 ' 

Philosophy, 103, 121 [ 4 

General Biology, 1, 2 4 

Electives -.--ZZZZZZ15 or 5 



Total 



92 



Major Work. For Bachelor degree, 30 units, at least half 
ot which must be in upper division work. 

Minor Work. Ten units, at least four of which must be 
upper division work. 



1 1 6 University of Southern California 

SOCIOLOGY 

EMORY S. BOGARDUS, ROCKWELL D. HUNT, Professors 

GEORGE F. KENNGOTT, Associate Professor 

HARRY J. McCLEAN, Assistant Professor 

JOHN E. KIENLE, Lecturer 

ERNEST J. LICKLEY, Lecturer 

HAZEL C. WILKINSON, Assistant 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1 Introduction to Sociology. A comprehensive study of 
social progress, with illustrations drawn continuously trom 
concrete historical and current conditions. An introductory 
course giving a survey of the field of sociology. Ope n pri- 
marily to sophomores; freshmen and juniors admitted. Two 
units throughout the year. (Bogardus.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100 Social Psychology. An introductory course for up- 
per division and graduate students. Gives the psychological 
approach. Deals with the social instincts, suggestion, imita- 
tion, suggestibility, the crowd, leadership, public opinion, 
social control, social progress. Three units; first semester. 
(Bogardus.) 

100a. Social Psychology. Same as course 100, repeated 
the second semester; three units. (Bogardus.) 

101 Municipal Problems. A study of the main problems 
of urban life. Includes special lectures by leading practical 
experts. Three units; first semester. (Hunt.) 

102 Labor Problems. A discussion of the leading prob- 
lems confronting men and women engaged m industry bee 
Economics 102. Three units; second semester. (Hunt.) 

103. Americanization and Immigration. A study of the 
causes of migration in the history of the world of the Euro- 
pean backgrounds of immigration to the United States, of 
the problems facing the immigrant while he is becoming ad- 
justed to a new environment, and of the nature of and need 
for Americanization. Three units; second semester. 
(Bogardus.) 

104 Charities. The nature, extent, and causes of poverty. 
The organization of charity work and the supervision of pub- 
lic and private agencies. Methods of prevention of poverty. 
The claL visits charitable institutions in Los Angeles and 
vicinity. Two units; first semester. (Kenngott.) 

106. Social Insurance. An examination of be ± th i theory 
and experience in provision for accident, sick <*», old age 
and invalidity, and other forms of social insurl t. Special 



The College of Liberal Arts 1 1 7 

reference is made to the California situation. Two units* 
second semester. (Kenngott.) 

107. The Liquor Problem. A discussion of the liquor 
problem in all of its phases. See Economics 107. One unit* 
throughout the year. (Hunt.) 

108. Socialism. Examines the underlying causes of the 
socialism movement, studies the various schools of socialism, 
and presents a critical estimate of socialism as a philosophy 
of economic evolution and a program of social reform. See 
Economics 108. Two units; second semester. (Hunt.) 

109. The Theory of Play. A study of the nature, func- 
tion, and need of play from psychological and sociological 
standpoints. Two units; first semester. (La Porte.) 

110. Playground Administration. History of the play- 
ground movement. Organization and management of play 
activities. Practice work given on the Los Angeles munici- 
pal playgrounds. Two units; second semester. (La Porte.) 

111. Social Ethics 1 and 2. First semester: Ethical theo- 
ries are examined in relation to the social questions; founda- 
tions are laid for intensive work. Second semester: Practi- 
cal applications are made; social and industrial life is sub- 
jected to the criteria set by a societary point of view. Two 
units; throughout the year. (Kenngott.) 

112. Social Legislation. The basic theory of social legis- 
lation. ( The technique for securing social legislation. A con- 
sideration of social legislation now operative— particularly in 
California— with special reference to needed measures Two 
units; second semester. (McClean.) 

114. Criminology. The nature of crime, the types of 
criminal offences, the history of methods of punishment, 
prison reform, parole, adult probation, the city jail system! 
methods of prevention. Members of the class are given op- 
portunity to visit the jails. and the courts. Two units- first 
semester. (McClean.) 

115. Juvenile Delinquency. The history of methods of 
dealing with delinquent children, the causes of delinquency 
and truancy, the juvenile court, probation, the self-govern- 
ment idea, methods of prevention. Two units; first semester. 
(Lickley.) 

116. Problems of Child Welfare. Child problems except 
that of delinquency. Child labor, child health, child illiteracy. 
Legislation in behalf of child welfare. Other constructive 
measures. Two units; second semester. (Lickley.) 

117. Social Surveys. Training in survey methods is given. 
Literature of the subject is considered. Social surveys of 



1 1 8 University of Southern California 

leading field problems are undertaken. The training may 
serve to open the way to permanent positions in social ser- 
vice work. Two units, second semester. (McUean.) 

118. Rural Sociology. The facts and conditions of rural 
life the Country Life Movement, the rural church the rural 
school, rural fraternal organizations, the Grange the village 
as a social unit, rural charity and correction, rural social sur- 
veys, the socialization of rural life. Two umts; first sem- 
ester. (McClean.) 

122. Japanese Immigration. A study of the conflict of 
two civilizations, the Oriental and the Occidental-par ticu- 
larly in California— and of the problems arising therefrom. 
Two units; first semester. (Inui.) 

125 Housing Problems. Analysis made of the different 
types of housing. Causes of housing evils are studied. Dit- 
ferent methods of improving housing conditions are consid- 
ered- housing inspections in Los Angeles are made. Two 
units'; throughout the year. (Kienle.) 

127 Social Problems in Relation to Social Service. A 
consideration of the social problems which face the social 
service workers. Gives an introductory background of 

^TtleSndtemeSr takes up problems of social hygiene. 
Two units; throughout the year. (Kenngott.) 

132. Elementary Law for Social Workers. Designed spe- 
cifically for those students who expect to enter the field of 
soda service, and who desire to have some knowledge of the 
tow applicable to their work. Text-book, lectures and as- 
Sgned P ?eading8. Two units; throughout the year. (McClean.) 
134. Educational Sociology. An interpretation of J the de- 
velopment of our educational system in relation to the social 
forces which have produced it. A sociological analysis of 
current problems in education. Two units, second semester. 
(Lickley.) 

136. Social Teachings of the Prophets and of Jesus. First 
semester- A study of the Old Testament writers with refer- 
ence to their social standards. Second semester: A compara- 
tive study of the social ideals of Jesus, Paul, and John. Two 
units; throughout the year. (Hill.) 

137 The Newspaper as a Social Institution. A consider- 
ation of news values on the basis of sociological principles. 
Three units; second semester. (Hopkins.) 

142 The Social Message of the Gospel. Attention is 
given to the social teachings of the gospels with special ref- 
frlnce to present-day conditions. Two units; second sem- 
ester. (Montgomery.) 



The College of Liberal Arts ] ] 9 

160. Special Investigation and Field Work. Special in- 
vest.gation of specific theoretical and field problems One or 
two units; throughout the year. (Bogardus.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

200. Seminar in Sociology. An advanced course, fori- 
£ a /n A fi . gradua ! es - r and . students who have completed 
oririnai rL~ nr u Um r -° s °ciolog y credit. Stress is laid upon 

hS n™? * * Cnt i que ? ° f CUrrent Ieadin S sociological 
books. Oral reports and written theses required. Two unit*- 
throughout the year. (Bogardus.) , ' 

hW" Seminar in the Relation of Religion to Social Ques- 
tions. Designed to meet the needs of a limited number of 
afcT and S0 ?- aI r orkers and other graduates showing 
adequate preparation for advanced work in applied sociology 
Two units; throughout the year. (Kenngott.) 

205 History of Sociological Thought. A history of 
tuTv oTthl ^°, Ught "r 6 - earHeSt tim ^- A comparative 

I ists of tS. V < S0C £ W " terS ' and ° f tHe l6ading S0d0l °- 

gists of the nineteenth century. Extensive library work 

Three units; first semester. (Bogardus.) 

206. Contemporary Sociological Thought. The contri- 
butions of present-day sociologists are considered. Atten- 

we?l « f^l t0 the Writi ^ g , S 0f leadin S soci al workers, as 
Md noe/° the . c urr cnt social thought in the drama, fiction, 
and poetry. Three units; second semester. (Bogardus.) 

210. Sociology Journal Club. Reviews and criticisms of 
the most important articles in current sociological journals 
including American, English, French, German, and Italian 
publications. One unit; throughout the year. (Bogardus.) 

Major Work for Bachelor's Degree: Thirty semester 
units, including Economics I. y bemester 

Minor Work for Bachelor's Degree: Twelve semester 



units. 



Minor Work for High School Teacher's Recommendation. 

bix semester units of upper division and graduate work. 

wo M k n ° r W ° rk f ° r Master ' s De gree: Six units of graduate 

High School Teacher's Recommendation. An undergradu- 
ate major" course followed by at least seven to eleven 
S/ g ™ du * te ™ ork > Sociology. The entire course shall 
include: Economics, Course 1; and the following courses in 
p°"°>P ; *• production to Sociology; 100 or 100a, Social 
psychology; 103 Immigration and Americanization; 104, 
i TV' 12 '- SOCI ?' Legislation; 200, Seminar in Sociob 
ogy, or 201, Seminar in Religion and Social Questions; and 



|20 University of Southern California 

205, History of Sociological Thought, or 206, Contemporary 
Sociological Thought. 

Major Work for Master's Degree. An undergraduate 
"major" course followed by at least ten units of graduate 
work in Sociology, and a thesis. The specific courses are the 
Tame as for the High School Teacher's recommendation. 

Sociological Monographs. The results of the best research 
work don! in the department of Sociology will be printed 1 in 
tine "Studies in Sociology," which is a series of monographs 
oublished by the Southern California Sociological Society. 
Seven monographs have been published to date (March 1, 
1918.) 

SPANISH 
KATHERINE T. FORRESTER, ROY E. SCHULZ. Professors 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

la Elementary Spanish. The essentials of Spanish gram- 
mar," careful drill in pronunciation, reading conversa ion and 
writing. Five units; first semester. Three divisions. (Forres- 
ter, Schulz.) 

lb. Elementary Spanish. A continuation of Course la 
Five units; second semester. Three divisions. (Forrester, 
Schulz.) 

Note-Not more than five units of Spanish 1 a-b may be credited 
toward a major course in Spanish. 

9 Advanced Spanish. Advanced reading, grammar and 
composition Three units; first semester. Three divisions. 
(Schulz, Forrester.) 

3. Advanced Reading and Composition. Selections from 
"Don Quijote" and "Gil Bias," and the reading of one or 
more novels. Advanced grammar and ^Xiz^rrerter ) 
units; second semester. Three divisions. (Schulz, Forrester.; 

4 Soanish Conversation. The work is based on text- 
books a P nTmagazmes. Two units; throughout the year. Four 
divisions. (Forrester, — •) 

5. Commercial Spanish. A business vocabulary and a 
knowledge of business forms is acquired. Two units, second 
semester. (Forrester.) 

UPPER DIVISION AND GRADUATE COURSES 

'l06. Modern Novels. Selections from the important nov- 



The College of Liberal Arts 121 

107. Modern Novels and Drama. A continuation of 
Course 106 with special reference to Spanish life and the 
Spanish view-point. Three units; second semester. (Schulz.) 

108. Advanced Composition. The translation of long se- 
lections, with particular attention to idioms and style. In- 
tended primarily for junior major students. Two units- sec- 
ond semester. (Schulz.) 

109. Nineteenth Century Literature. A pro-seminar 
course in which a special study is made of some chosen 
authors life and works. During 1919 Valera will be the 
subject of study. Two units; second semester. (Schulz.) 

110. Lyric Poetry. A rapid survey of Spanish Lyric 
Poetry with some attention to metrical forms. Two units- 
first semester. ( .) ' 

111. Spanish Prose. A rapid survey of the history of 
Spanish Prose. Two units; second semester. ( — — .) 

112. The Drama of the Golden Age. Reading and discus- 
sion of selections from Lope de Vega, Calderon, and Tirso de 
Molino. Two units; first semester. Alternates with Course 
110 and will not be given in 1918. (■ .) 

113. Modern Drama. Selections from prominent authors 
of the nineteenth century. Two units; second semester. Al- 
ternates with Course 111 and will not be given in 1918-1919 

114. Current Events. Discussions in Spanish of current 
events with special reference to Spain and Spanish Amer- 
ica. One unit; throughout the year. (Forrester.) 

115. Contemporary Novelists. Reading and discussion of 
selections from important living novelists. Two units; firs' 
semester. ( -.) 

116. Contemporary Dramatists. Lectures and readings 
from important living dramatists. Two units; second sem- 
ester. ( .) 

u 117. Spanish Syntax. A study of the finer points of Span- 
ish syntax based on Bello-Cuervo. Intended primarily for 
senior major students and a prerequisite of the Teachers' 
Course (222). Two units; first semester. (Schulz.) 

118. History of Spanish Literature. A rapid survey of 
Spanish Literature. Required of all major students. Two 
units; second semester. (Schulz.) 

PRIMARILY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

219. Spanish Ballads. A study of selections from the 
Spanish romancer o. Two units; first semester. ( .) 



122 University of Southern California 

220. Old Spanish. A study of the development of the 
Spanish language in the earlier periods of its history. The 
equivalent of at least two years of preparatory Latin is a 
prerequisite. Two units, second semester. ( .) 

221 Castilian Phonetics. A study of the conclusions of 
Araujo, Joselyn, Colton and Navarro Tomas, with some con- 
sideration of non-Castilian Spanish. Two units; nrst 
semester. ( •) 

222. Teachers' Course. A study of the methods of pre- 
senting the four-year high-school course in Spanish. Inree 
units; second semester. (Schulz.) 

223 Seminar. The work of the Spanish seminar is the 
critical investigation of some selected author or period. In 
1918-1919 the chosen author will be Cervantes. Iwo units, 

throughout the year. ( •) 

For courses in Latin American Literature and Latin American Poetry 
see Latin American Department. 

Major Work. Thirty semester units, including courses 108, 
117 and 118. 

Minor Work. Ten semester units exclusive of course 1 a-b, 
four of which shall be in upper division, courses. 

High School Teachers' Recommendation. Thirty semester 
units, including courses 108, 117, 118 and 222. 



COURSES IN ENGINEERING 

WAR COURSES IN ENGINEERING 

t For practically all grades of work in engineering and allied 
lines, including commissions in the engineering divisions of 
army service, the government requires that the man complete 
the work of a four year college course or its equivalent. The 
following courses meet this condition and as far as is prac- 
tical those subjects which bear most directly upon military 
work will be presented with this aim in view. 

ENGINEERING ENLISTED RESERVE 

In accordance with regulations issued by the War Depart- 
ment of the federal government, students who are registered, 
and are carrying their work with recommended grades in the 
four year engineering courses, may enlist in the Engineer's 
Reserve Corps and will during the period of their attendance 
of college be exempted from active military service. The 
purpose of this reserve is to furnish men trained in technical 
lines to meet the demands of the industrial work of the 
future. 



ARCHITECTURE 

D. C. ALLISON, A. C. WEATHERHEAD, Professors 
H. SCOTT GERITY, Instructor 

• A a f ° U - r year & eneral c °urse leading to the degree of B. S. 
in Architecture. The course includes the theory and prac- 
tice of architectural design, the history of architecture, and 
the principles of architectural engineering. 

Owing to war conditions several of the courses in Archi- 
tecture listed below will not be given, unless a sufficient num- 
ber of students enroll. 

REQUIRED COURSE IN ARCHITECTURE 

First Year Units. Units. 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

Mathematics, 4, 5, 6 5 5 

Physics, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 6 6 

English, 1 3 3 

Drawing, 1— Mechanical Drawing 2 

Drawing, 8— Shades and Shadows *2 

Architecture, 1— Freehand Drawing 2 2 

Architecture, 8— Elements of Architecture.... 1 1 



124 University of Southern California 

Second Year 



Units. Units. 
1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 



Mathematics, 7, 108 3 | 

German or French - £ ? 

Art, 4— Drawing from Life * 



5 



Drawing, 6— Descriptive Geometry ^ * 

Drawing, 9— Architectural Perspective. -- * 

Civil Eng., 13— Materials of Construction 6 - ... 

Architecture, 5— History of Architecture 3 J 

Architecture, 10— Architectural Drawing 1 i 

Architecture, 15— Elementary Architectural ^ 

Design 



5 



Third Year 

Civil Eng., 107, 108— Mechanics and Strength 

of Materials : - - ^ 

Civil Eng., 115— Graphic Statics -- i -- 

Civil Eng., 116— Stresses in Steel Structures .... * 

Civil. Eng., 118— Structural Design - * 

Architecture, 2— Water Color 1 \ 

Architecture, 3— Pen and Ink Rendering .- i 

Architecture, 100— Building Illumination and 

Acoustics 9 

Architecture, 101— Sanitation -- * ---- 

Architecture, 106— History of Architecture.. 3 6 

Architecture, 116— Intermediate Architectural ^ 

Design - 

Fourth Year 

Art, 9— Clay Modeling .....-.--- -- l 

Civil Eng., 118— Structural Design J -- 

Civil Eng., 121— Reinforced Concrete.. «$ ^ 

Architecture, 110— Professional Practice. 1 

Architecture, 102— Heating and Ventilating 2 
Architecture, 117— Advanced Architectural g 

Design -- - • 1 * 

Architecture, 120— Thesis L 

COURSES IN ARCHITECTURE 

1 Freehand Drawing. Drawing from geometrical solids 
in pencil and charcoal. Lectures and class problems on the 
"rincTpTes and processes of freehand drawing <^™\£g 
wash drawings of architectural °™"^^ 
Drawing from parts of existing buildings. Six hours, two 
units; throughout the year. (Weatherhead.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 125 

2. Water Color. Drawing and rendering of architectural 
subjects in water color. The principles of color harmony. 
Out-of-door sketching in water color. Three hours, one unif 
throughout the year. (Virden.) 

3. Pen and Ink Rendering. Rendering of architectural 
subjects in pen and ink. Three hours, one unit; second sem- 
ester. 

5. History of Architecture. A course tracing the devel- 
opment of building from the earliest times down to the be- 
ginning of the Renaissance. Lectures and sketch problems. 
Three units; throughout the year. 

8. Elements of Architecture. A study of the elements of 
the best examples of Classical Architecture, practice in ren- 
dering, and simple designing. Three hours, one unit; 
throughout the year. (Gerity.) 

10. Architectural Drawing. Architectural lettering, de- 
tailing, and the preparation of working drawings. Three 
hours, one unit; throughout the year. (Weatherhead.) 

15. Elementary Design. A series of monthly rendered 
problems involving the application of elementary architec- 
tural forms as given in course 8, and the principles of plan- 
ning and designing. Two units; throughout the year. (Alli- 
son and Gerity.) 

100. Building Illumination and Acoustics. A course in 
the theory and methods of lighting buildings, electric lamps 
and other illuminants, wiring, etc. The principles of archi- 
tectural acoustics and their application to the designing of 
interiors. Three units; first semester. (Nye.) 

101. Sanitation. The principles of sanitation. The meth- 
ods of sewage disposal. Modern plumbing systems and fix- 
tures. Two units; first semester. (Lawrence.) 

102. Heating and Ventilating. The theory and practice 
of heating and ventilating buildings, including a study of the 
various modern systems. Two units; first semester. 

106. History of Architecture. A continuation of course 
5 tracing the development of architectural forms from the 
Duomo of Florence to the present day. Lectures and sketch 
problems. Three units; throughout the year. 

107. History of Ornament. Lectures and sketch prob- 
lems tracing the development of ornament from early times 
to the present day. Original designs required in the prin- 
cipal historic periods. Prerequisite— Architecture 5, or Art 
and Design 12. One unit; throughout the year. 

110. Professional Practice. A study of the relations be- 
tween the architect and his client, the owner, and the con- 



] 26 University of Southern California 

tractor. Contracts and specifications. Building ordinances. 
One unit; throughout the year. 

116. Intermediate Design. A continuation of course 15. 
Three units; throughout the year. (Allison and Genty.) 

117. Advanced Design. Extended problems in original 
design. Six units; throughout the year. (Allison and Genty.) 

120 Thesis. An advanced study of some special problem 
in architectural designing. One unit, first semester; three 
units; second semester. (Allison.) 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CHARLES W. LAWRENCE, Professor 
C. W. COOK, Associate Professor 

The great industrial development of recent years in every 
part of the United States has created a large demand for 
trained civil engineers. The course in Civil Engineering has 
been madl broad in order to meet this demand by Providing 
a sufficient foundation for the wide range of practice now 
included under Civil Engineering. 

VeS few college students know in what part of his .wide 
field their life work will lie. Because of this, and the great 
difficulty of mastering fundamentals during the stress of pro- 
fessional work, it has seemed best to provide a broad um- 
versity preparation and to defer specialization to the period 
of active employment. . ,, ^ 

The course is designed to give a practical as ; wel la a 
theoretical training. Nearly as much time is spent in the 
drawing room, laboratory and field as ,n the lecture room 

By consulting the schedule following, it will be seen that 
considerable time is devoted to Mathematics English and 
the Sciences. Of the more technical work, Field Engineer- 
ing is giVen very full treatment in lecture room, office and 

fie in the third year Theoretical Mechanics is thoroughly de- 
veloped and forms the basis for the designing and construc- 
tion that occupy the remainder of the course. The importance 
of correct methods of thought and practice is constantly 

^A'very Targe amount of important engineering work is 
continually going on in the vicinity of Los Angeles Jhe 
proximity of harbors, mines, irrigation and water, supply 
nrokcts several transcontinental railroad terminals, and ex- 
tensfve electric power plants and railway systems offers a 
diversity of excellent examples of engineering : cons r «ti«L 
Students in this department, accompanied by instructors, are 
required to inspect much of this work and to present written 
reports on what they have seen. 



The College of Liberal Arts 127 

t 

REQUIRED COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

First Year 

first semester Lab. Class 

Hours. Hours. 

Mathematics, 4, 5— Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Physics, 2 — Mechanics 3 

Physics, 3 3 

Civil Engineering, 1 — Surveying Theory 2 

Civil Engineering, 2— Field Work 6 

Drawing, 4 5 

English, 1 * 3 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Mathematics, 6 — Analytical Geometry 5 

Physics, 6 — Electricity 3 

Physics, 7 3 

Civil Engineering, 1 2 

Civil Engineering, 2 ™" 6 

English, 1 """ "3 

Drawing, 5 5 



Second Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Mathematics, 7— Differential Calculus 3 

Geology, 2 — Mineralogy 2 

Civil Engineering, 13— Materials ""Z...... .... 3 

Drawing, 6 — Descriptive Geometry 3 1 

Physics, 4 — Heat " " 2 

Chemistry 2— Qualitative Analysis ...l.__." 3 

Chemistry, 2a 5 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Mathematics, 108— Integral Calculus 3 

Geology, 2 2 

Civil Engineering, 3— Advance "d" Surveying^!"]!...! 6 2 

Drawing, 6 — Descriptive Geometry... 3 1 

Physics, 8— Light i 

Chemistry, 3 3 

Chemistry, 3a !ZZ.Z" 6 



128 University of Southern California 

Third Year 

first semester Lab. Class 

Hours. Hours. 

Civil Eng., 107— Analytical Mechanics .. 3 

Civil Eng., 108— Mathematics of Materials ■- * 

Civil Eng., 115— Graphical Statics <> --• 

Civil Eng., 104— R. R. Engineering Theory ~ £> 

Civil Eng., 105— R. R. Engineering Practice 6 .... 

Elect. Eng., 4— Steam Engineering * 

Elect. Eng., 101a '. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Civil Eng., 107 - \ 

Civil Eng., 108 \ 

Civil Eng., 116— Stresses - ^ 

Elect. Eng., 5— Steam Engineering * 

Civil Eng., 109— Hydraulics ...... - - 5 

Civil Eng., 105-106— R. R. Engineering 4 * 

Civil Eng., 118— Structural Design o 



Fourth Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Civil Eng., 121— Reinforced Concrete 3 2 

Civil Eng., 118— Structural Design ° 1 

Geology, 105 - \ 2 

Mathematics, 112— Astronomy , 

Civil Eng., Ill— Water Supply * 

Civil Eng., 112— Sanitary Engineering * 

Civil Eng., 110— Irrigation Engineering * 

Economics, 1 i 

Civil Eng., 123— Thesis - ° 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Civil Eng., 118 **2 

Geology, 105 --- ----- ---• £ 2 

Civil Eng, 121— Reinforced Concrete ^ * 

Civil Eng 122— Contracts and Specifications x 

Civil Eng.', 119— Highway Engineering -- 

Civil Eng., 123— Thesis - ° "3 

Economics, 1 ~<i 

Civil Eng., 117— Eng. Lab * 

Engineering Seminar - 



The College of Liberal Arts 129 

COURSES IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

nrL;l Ur 7 y } ng ' Reciti * tions and lectures on the theory and 
practice of plane surveying. The course includes the use and 

Z T L° m , stT A m ^ tS; T thods of Procedure and of keeping 

P utation r and ;. C ^' ^STW SUrveyS; ^traction. S 
putation and platting of field notes. Prerequisites a course 

Texf a Sre^ ng0n ,°M etry - ^ - Units; throughout 'the year 
ve e ying/' re VoL n i d ^cTokJ PnndpleS and PraCtice ° f Sur " 

2 Surveying Field Work. The practical adjustment of 
surveying instruments; the proper method of keeping clear 

tape kveT'oTane'thr ^^- ' fidd problems ^chafn 
III aH ■ ' P e table ' . translt - compass, etc. The work in 
the drawing room consists of platting the field notes and 

me y 1 e g ar Pr c o fi urse a i d to Tla h PS V ?* h ° mS ' tW ° --^ throughout 

and KMSSTpSd? M^uS" 7^5"^ ^ " PenCC 

3a. Higher Surveying. Recitations and lectures on tn P 

1?m°/ y - a ? d ,- PraC ^ 1C J e ° f the more advanced urveyTng prob- 
lems, including hydrographic surveying, and mapp "I Pre 

Brd Slt a e nd C °Hos e mir: n Vo7. ST ^SL^ ™' ^ 
3b. Higher Surveying, Field Work. Topographical snr 

mTasuTemeS^f S 16 f^ 8tad > ?* --e/s? Ssurv ££ 
measurement of base lines and triangulation svstems rletpr 
mination of meridian and latitude. Prerequisite 7 coTrse 1 and 
2. Six hours' field work, two units. (Cook.) 

13. Materials of Construction. A study of the manner 
ron a ? d , P T ertl< ^° f St -° nes ' cements - concretes timber" 
of° n the St k waking fi't" to the determination' 
Text, Mills' MateHf,s St of Clnstr^ct^^ffiookf ^^ 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

104. Railroad Engineering. A course including the theorv 
of curves switches, and sidings; the making £f reconafe 
sances and preliminary and location surveys; the computation 
ht ea .f t fi W0 1 rk and ^termination of structures; andX mak- 
ing ot final estimates of cost. Prerequisites course 1 ami 2 
Two units; first semester. Text "AUenZ T?S?a r 
ind Earthwork." (Cook.) Allen s Railroad Curves 

,vl° 5 -" P ai . lroa d Engineering, Field and Office Work Prar 
•ice in laying out curves, making a complete Purvey for a 

nust £\£ radWay ' and , doin ^ the omce work. Course 104 
nust be taken concurrently. Eight hours, three unks first 



1 30 University of Southern California 

semester- three hours, one unit, second semester Text, 
"Allen's Railroad Curves and Earthwork." (Cook.) 

106 Economics of Railroad Location. The fundamental 
^WlfSSi 3T533 ^£^ 

to maintenance and operation. Prere^isrte, co 
Two units; second semester, text, *.aynii» u 
Engineering." (Cook.) 

tion of center of gravity, moment of inertia, « nt ™^ firs £ 
etc. Prerequisite, Mathematics 7 and ^ ™« "J ^p- 
semester; two units, second semester. Text .Hancock Ap 
plied Mechanics for Engineers. (Lawrence.; 

108 Strength of Materials. A mathematical course m 
tbe°isiftanc?and elasticity of materials stresses and a,, 
shearing, flexure, beams columns and *™™ m ££ ri three 
must be taken concurrently Two units .first seme ^^ 

^^^ffi»U T sStrd^^blc». in Strength 
of Materials." (Cook.) 

Slocum's Hydraulics." (Lawrence.) 

110. Irrigation Engineering. P^ersion conveyance a^ 

Newell and Murphy's "Irrigation Engineering. 

111. Water Supply- The = determination erf the q— 
and quality of supply, water punncat on anu 
S^'S IKS? and°Ssif r£c W,«r 
Supplies." (Lawrence.) 

112. Sanitary '.Engineering The drainage , of buildings, 
treatment, and disposal of sewage, sewey Text> 

^^^TDispXrSicSrWinslow and Pratt." (Law- 

rence.) . . r 

115. Graphical Statics. The graphical determination of 

JB2SS5JUr«5 $£?£. SB; nrst semester. 
Lectures and Drafting. (Lawrence.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 131 

116. Stresses in Framed Structures and Arches. The ana- 

ytical and graphical methods applied to determining stresses 
in roof and bridge trusses and masonry arches. Prereouisite 
courses 107 and .115 Three units; second semester Text' 
Turneaure s Modern Framed Structures, Vol. 1. (Lawrence.) 

ma 1 f/;,- 3 | En ^ leerin ^ Laboratory. The testing of engineering 
™},fl Prer / < l ulslte . course 108. Three laboratory hours 
one unit; second semester. Work done at the Osbourn Test- 
ing Laboratory (by special arrangement.) 

118. Structural Design. The theory for and practice of 

^ructu g re C s° mP T lete t de "?5 8 ^ Sted h " d ^ s > roofsTnd othe 
structures. Lectures, drawing, and computing. Prereaui- 
site, courses 08 and 116. One hour lecture, si X g hours draf- 
ilL (Lawrence) ' " M .° dern Framed Structures!" Vol. 

5 "!' _ Hig . hwa J Engineering. Roads and streets of broken 
f,n£' paved and 0lled road s, the location of new roads. Two 

ren S t;.» SeC ( L n a d wre e n m c e e S ) er - TeXt ' " BaWs R ° ads and Pa -" 

121. Reinforced Concrete. The theory, design, construc- 
tion and estimates of concrete and reinforced concrete struc. 
tures including buildings, foundations, retaining walls tun! 
nels, culverts, dams. Two hours lecture, three hours design 

fo?ceH hr r e Uni ? ; t hrou S hout ^e year. Text, Hool's "ffi- 
forced Concrete Construction," Vol. I and II. (Cook.) 

122. Contracts and Specifications. A synoosis of the law 
s°tud C v 0n of aC t tS - a YPP lied t0 engineering consfruction and Z 
t, ft - ym - al c . ontract s and specifications. The course 

Onetn:: gh ^ b ° Undary ^ neS > Survey ^scripS, 
in En^rn'eerg.^Twenctr- ^ TUCker ' S " C ° ntraCtS 

nf l ll ' ; T hesis ; A - study of some special engineering problem 
of an independent investigation by the student The sub e£ 
must be approved by the professor in charge of the depart 
K ? Cl ^ t En f. lneei :ing and by the proffssor who would 
rtf ah ^ medlate direction of the work proposed not later 
than November 1st of the senior year. It must be com 
le ted and submitted by June 1st of the ame year One" 
wit, first semester; two units, second semester. (Lawrence ) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

■nntf; Struc r u F al Engineering. The theory and design of 
uch b U rXef ,rd T S ' SWin - g ' cantde ver, suspension of Silk 

221. Advanced Reinforced Concrete. The theorv and 
lesign of reinforced concrete bridges, arches, tunnefs and 



1 32 University of Southern California 

chimneys. Two units credit Text, Hocl's "Reinforced Con- 
struction," Vol. III. (Cook.) 

224. Theory »d M«hod <"«»«,*»*( .?,'«£?& 

and Least Squares." (Lawrence.) 

225. Seminar. A two unit course in the jading and dis- 
cussion of the current engineering literature 

226. Shipbuilding. **?^%^££$$£to«£ 
^f^fpV-Th^eVS Te^fnt&nl Prerequisites, 
courses, 108, 109, 118. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

ARTHUR W. NYE, J. H. MONTGOMERY, Professors 
j F WILSON, Associate Professor 
The courses offered in th^departoent are .designed to fit 
EficaTa^^urindalS 

^D^in^e^esh^and sopho-re y^there £ a 
broad foundation, consisting of Physics, Mecn , senior 

try, Surveying, and drawing During the ic{ are 

years special studies in electricity and f a ™ ■ { and mag . 
pursued. These involve the theory °* e^ct y ^^ 

netism with application o d ^; c X en t machinery and ap- 
uring instruments and ^ ^^^^^onous and induction 
paratus, comprising alternators, s y Courses are also 

ling of electrical machinery. { - d deve r p- 

Southern Californ a, m its £«*«£ ^ \£ hydraulic and 

in and about Los Angeles 5 or n d ^Xn Smiss ion not sur- 



The College of Liberal Arts 133 
REQUIRED COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
First Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Lab. Class 

Hours. Hours. 

Mathematics, 4, 5— Algebra, Trigonometry 5 

Drawing, 4 ^ J 

Physics, 2— Mechanics "."." "i 

Physics 3 ^ ^ 

English, i ;;;;;;; J - - 

Civil Eng., 1— Surveying, Theory ""_".* 2 

Civil Eng., 2— Surveying, Field ]"Z "3 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Mathematics, 6— Analytical Geometry c 

Drawing, 5 ^ 

Physics, 6— Electricity "i 

Physics, 7 , ^ 

English, 1 d • ■ 

Civil Eng., 1 ; • % 

Civil Eng., 2 j ' 



Second Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Physics, 4, 5— Heat <, 

Physics, 21— Shop : 3 . Z 

Elect Eng. 4— Steam Engineering"""."" * 2 

Civil Eng, 13— Materials... { 

Mathematics, 7— Differential" Calculus" \ 

Drawing, 6— Descriptive Geometry. i ] 

Chemistry 2— Qualitative Analysis J 

Chemistry, 2a ^ J 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Physics, 8, 9— Light , 

Physics, 21— Shop .Z.Z.Z. 3 

Elec. Eng., 5— Steam Engineering "9 

Physics, 16— Electricity . "" i 

Chemistry, 3 Z 

Chemistry, 3a ^ ** 

Mathematics 1 08-1 ntegrZ'Od cuius";;:; "3 

Elec. Eng .111- Workshop Mechanics... \ 

Ihysics, 17— Physical Measurements 3 



, 34 University of Southern California 

Third Year 

FIR ST SEMESTER L*^ gj£ 

5 

ife?!*^ 6 i 

Civil Eng., 107, 108— Mechanics ! 

Physics, 114— Thermodynamics 2 

Elec. Eng., 106— Excursions 3 

Physics, 112— Illumination 

SECOND SEMESTER 

S 

"FTl^r Fns* 101b & 

E ec En|.',' 102-Dynamo Laboratory -j 

Civil En!.! 107, 108-Mechanics 2 .... 

Elec Eng., 106— Excursions - 3 

Drawing, 7— Machine Design 



5 



Fourth Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Elec. Eng, 1«?>-Alt«nating Current ._-.— ~ 

SS S:. W«# b ^c*. y :. - -J I 

Elect. Eng., 112-Thesis "ZZZZi 3 

Economics, .1 — — - : " ... 2 

Elect. Eng., 106-Excursions 

SECOND SEMESTER 

3 

Elect Eng., 103b— Alternating Currents. 

fleet. Eng, 109-Electnc Railroads -— -g 

Fleet Eng., 107— A. C. Lab 3 

CvU Eng? 109-Hydrauhcs -- "3 .... 

Elect. Eng., 112-Thesis 'ZZZZ 3 

Economics, 1 -»- : .. 2 

Elect Eng., 106— Excursions 2 

Elect Eng, 110-Transmission 

COURSES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 



4 Steam Engineering. BoUers, combustten f«l., taw|rf 
gates and heat-conduction corrosio^ ^^ Aeam 
P owe e r a plants P - Pe T S wo tC uniS ?S5 semester. (Montgomery.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 135 

5. Steam Engineering. A study of various types of steam 
turbines and steam engines, indicator cards, valve motion™ 
and diagrams, multiple expansion, design of parts General 
layout of plants. Two units; second semester. (Nye ) 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 



101a. Dynamo Electric Machinery. This course com- 
prises a study of the theory and operation of d rect and 
alternating current circuits and machinery. Text: "Elements 

n^lrmesTe^XT^ ^ * * Wi ' S ° n - F ™ UnitS; 
101b. Dynamo Electric Machinery. This course com- 
prises a study of electric distribution and lighting and the 
elementary principles of Alternating Currents. Five units 
second semester. (Nye.) units, 

mifnf?^ Laboratory. Study is made of the perform- 
ance of direct-current machines by means of their character- 
istic curves; efficiency, regulation, and heat tests are run- and 
various methods of operating generators and motors and the"? 
auxiliary control ^apparatus are studied. Junior year s7x 
hours, two units; second semester. (Wilson.) 

tJnrf/o AIternatin ? Currents. A mathematical study of the 
theory and applications to modern machinery. Study of text 
and lectures Text: "Alternating Currents and Alternating 
(WnsoLf aChmery ' by JaCkS ° n - Five Units ; first semester 

„n;? s 3b 'c Alte , rnatin g Currents. Continuation of 3a. Three 
units; second semester. (Wilson.) w 

toJiX w^fh 11 ^ 8 - T HpS u t(1 various P° wer P lan *s and fac- 
tories with a view to observing methods and processes 
Written reports required of students. processes. 

cm7e'nt D I^^ ah % at0Iy - TeStS a c- nd stud y of alternating 

PgLu?X tU y S ear. Se ( n ^so y n e .? r - ** h ° UrS ' tW ° ^ 

108. Theory of Electricity. The electrical unit* ™A *W,- 

Irst semester (Wn S on) yeS; ^ aCd ° nS; etC " Tw0 units ^ 

teS^^ 1 ^^?^ SS3B 

gomery) '' SeC ° nd semester - (Mont- 

.^i!°' transmission and Station Equipment A studv r>f th» 

sec^d^semeiter.^^e) ? ^ ^ machiner ^ T ™ **.; 



, 36 University of Southern California 

111.' Workshop Mechanics A ~n«d^o^of th^ mate- 
rials of machine construction, of the ™ ettl0Q n0 credits , but 

^0^ im^^^^^^ (M ° nt " ' 
g0 n2 ry Thesis. An original investigation and study of some 
SPe O C n t students who -ow ^selves pe^ y ^ 
S32^^5^1&»* ^ Heu of Thesis 

MINING AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

LAIRD J. STABLER, L. * WEATHERBY,, 
GILBERT E. BAILEY, Professors 

The University ^^^SS° S^as 

• course in Mining and ChemKal _Eng£7*£ amental ™ h ^ tS 

outlined, gives thorough W" drawing, and the ele- 

of mathematics, chemistry P^ sl « , aid in the two years 

ments of engineering. The foundatio g col . 

P^'^omSrJh^rkofX Junior and Senior years, 
P Sring°rEing -a M^lurgy ^^ I 

Students who desire : to complete ™ ments - n Llb ra ; 
University may, by ^y 1 ^ tne fro ^ the Department of 
Arts, select their ^"Sring courses for which credit 
S h ^nn a Ubera? Arts?^ beVaduated as maprs ■ 

Chemistry. 

Courses in Mining or Chemical Engineering 

Freshman Year ^.^ Units 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

3 4 

English, 1 — — :-■- "" 5 \ 

Mathematics, 4, 5, ; 5 5 

Chemistry, 2, 2a, S, te 2 * 

Civil Engineering, 1 V^r^&yZ. 2 5 

Civil Engineering, 2 (meld wo™, 2 > 

Drawing, 4, 5 ^ 

in Arts. 



The College of Liberal Arts 137 

Sophomore Year 

Units. Units. 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

Mathematics, 7, 108— Calculus 3 3 

Geology, 3 — Ores and Metals 2 2 

Drawing, 3 — Elements of Perspective 1 1 

Drawing, 6 3 3 

Physics, 2, 3 3 6, 7 6 6 

jChemistry, 4, 108 4 4 



INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 

Students who have completed the two years of work out- 
lined above may continue their work in the College of Lib- 
eral Arts and the department of Chemistry. The completion 
of this curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Considerable latitude is allowed in the work of these two 
years so that students having in mind a particular field such 
as Agriculture, Oil Analysis, or Sanitary Science, may special- 
ize therein. This work should be arranged with the major 
professor. It is suggested electives should be made from 
Chemistry 109, 109a, 110a, 112, 112a, 113, 113a, 114a, 215, 216; 
Geology 2, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, Zoology 1, General Biology 
3, 103. 

It is strongly urged that a course in Biology and one in 
Economics be included and where a modern language is not 
offered for entrance it is highly desirable that one should 
be taken. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Liberal Arts of the University of Southern 
California is" situated in Los Angeles, about three and one- 
half miles southwest from the business section of the city. 
Th College buildings are accessible by three .lines o street 
cars the West Jefferson Street, the University and the Fa 
cine Electric lines. This is one of the most ^ beaut iful and 
rapidly growing residence sections of Los Angeles. 

EQUIPMENT 

The University Libraries. The University Libraries con- 
taJ over 35,000 volumes, professional libraries being main- 
tained at the Colleges of Law, Physicians and Surgeons, Fine 
Arts, Dentistry and Theology. 

The Library of the College of Liberal Arts containing 

^?£^l^T~ S M- newtlunTes 
Z S addea e^ch y;a? e t o rg meet the demands of the various 

^The^eTerence room contains the general reference books 
the bonnd mSz nes, and a carefully selected list of current 
the Dounai « , tains the circulating books 

SSTSrJ^^ occupy the entire first floor o 
the north wing and provide ample space for study and re 

Sea A Tl h omcers, students, and graduates of the University have 
free access to he library and may draw books or home use. 
S .helves are open to members of the Faculty and upon 
« h c:mm e e V nd S at a o e n o P f their ma^or professors, to students en- 

ga f ht LVrSTslprnfive days in the week from 7:50 A M. 
to 5 30 PM, "and Tom 7:00 ^9:00 P. M.; on Saturdays from 
8:00 A. M. to 3:30 P. M. 

The Los Angeles Public Library of over 150,000 volumes is 
a most valuable supplement to the .facilities offered by *e 

University Library, and » *™ ss ™\£ ^TuTary, and 
University Library is a depository of the Public Linrary, 



The College of Liberal Arts 1 39 

books as needed are brought from the Public Library for the 
use of the students. The resources of the University library 
are supplemented by an inter-library loan system with other 
colleges in the State. 

The Museum contains an extensive collection of specimens 
in mineralogy and geology, which have been accumulated 
during the past years by donation and purchase. This col- 
lection has been classified and arranged so as to illustrate the 
daily work of the classes in geology and mineralogy. The 
museum contains the collection purchased from Dr. Stephen 
Bowers; and those donated by the late Rev. C. R. Pattee, 
Mrs. Mary Wright, and Professor Dickinson. These private 
collections are specially rich in archaeological and concholog- 
ical material. 

All who donate specimens to this department will receive 
due acknowledgment on the labels. 

Civil Engineering Laboratory for Testing Materials. For 

the purpose of conducting series of tests in the strength 
of materials used in engineering construction, arrangements 
have been made for the use of the apparatus of the Raymond 
Osborn Testing Laboratories located in the Marsh-Strong 
building. The equipment of this laboratory is as complete as 
any on the Pacific coast. Included in the apparatus is a 
200,000 pound Olsen tensile and compression machine, a cold 
bending machine, two cement testing machines with the nec- 
essary immersion tanks and moist closets, sand analysis ap- 
paratus and all the minor appliances for carrying on scientific 
tests of materials. 

Physical and Electrical Engineering Laboratories. The 

Departments of Physics and Electrical Engineering occupy 
eleven rooms on the first floor of the Main Building and the 
north wing. These have been planned and equipped ex- 
clusively for the department and are well suited to the pur- 
poses for which they are used. Ample laboratory space is 
provided and equipped for experimental work in elementary 
and advanced physics, optics, photometry, electrical measure- 
ments, and direct and alternating currents and high frequency 
measurements. 

The apparatus and instruments are modern and of the best 
quality. The equipment in Mechanics includes a number of 
excellent precision pieces by Gaertner; in Heat, apparatus by 
Pye of Cambridge, England; in Light, interferometer, spectro- 
meters, prisms, gratings, etc., by Gaertner, Wilson, and Kohl. 



140 University of Southern California 

In Electricity the equipment is especially complete. Special 
mentior may be made of standing resistances, P°stoffice 
b^xe sliSwire bridges, potentiometer by Leeds and North- 
rjrportable galvanometers, type H galvonometers, Thomp- 
son dynamometer, tangent galvanometers, standards of sc\i- 
fnduction sechometer, permeameter, and variable condensers. 

IHbe-r s ^^^^ 

GC -S dynamo room's equipped with a number of direct and 
alternating current machines of various ypes There is a 
?Sw General Electric revolving-field alternator wih spe- 
cial winding for various phase and voltage connections. This 
Machine hal also, three extra rotors so that u may be .run „ 
an induction motor with squirrel-cage rotor, with an external 
distance rotor, or with an internal resistance rotor. It may 
nUn be run as a synchronous motor. 

The 7 5-Kw. We^tinghouse double current generator may 
be used as a 1, 2, or 3-phase alternator, or as a 125-volt D. C. 
venerator, or as a rotary converter. ,-„ 

Addition to these machines ^ere - also, a UJw. 
Crocker-Wheeler generator, a l.S-Kw. Edison u. ^ S 
tor an 800-watt Westinghouse D C. generator westu ng 
house 1 and 5-horsepower induction motors, and Genera 
Electric 1 and 3-horsepower induction motors, the later 

of the motor generator sets is arranged for operation ^ t 
Urtnre room for demonstration purposes. A stereopticon 

ponabU P pho.ome«r, standard lamps, color screen, five foot 

'"Setrllesf :„n h i.7'SnS y cnnipntcnt. contains one 
2 2, S voltage transformer, , high-cap.cty o.allatton 
SaS" h& PO-e^l -denser (.firee „,,,,, and^a 

break-key for sending. The unit receiving a 



The College of Liberal Arts 141 

mineral detectors, two Fleming audions, a loose-coupled ex- 
perimental detector, a tuning transformer, and two latest 
type condensers. There are also wave meters, hot wire me- 
ters, various types of spark gaps, several types of tuning and 
resonance coils, several sources of high frequency currents, 
etc. 

In the machine shop are provided tools for repair work 
and training in shop practice. These include a twelve-inch 
engine lathe, a speed lathe, a drill press, taps, dies and drills, 
and bench tools for wood and metal work. 

The Library contains a large number of reference books 
on many special subjects in Electrical Engineering and 
General Physics. 

The Biological Equipment. The entire second floor of the 
new north wing of the main building is devoted to the bio- 
logical laboratories and lecture room. The four laboratories 
with their 110 feet of desks facing immediately to the north, 
are so planned that each student has abundant light. Each 
student is supplied with two drawers and a microscope 
locker, each with Craig combination-locks. Specifically, the 
equipment of the four laboratories is as follows: 

The Zoological Laboratory, 34x35 feet, contains forty-seven 
single desks and a large demonstration table 4x11 feet, with 
drawers and cupboards on each side for supplies. The labor- 
atory is provided with an aquarium, a drip for keeping live 
specimens, glass cases for books, reagents and specimens, 
etc. Each student is furnished a compound microscope, BA 
2 or BB2, dissecting instruments, and the necessary materials 
for dissection and study. 

A Bausch and Lomb physician's type of microscope has 
been presented to the department by Mrs. Scherer in memory 
of her husband, the late Dr. Luther D. Scherer. The instru- 
ment is provided with a~ complete set of lenses and accessories 
as follows: 1-12 inch oil-immersion objective, V 8 inch objec- 
tive with compensating collar, and 3/ 4 inch objective, two eye 
pieces, substance condenser, stage micrometer, eye-piece 
micrometer and other accessories. 

The Botanical Laboratory is thirty by forty-five feet It 
contains forty-eight single desks with drawers and lockers 
and Craig combination-locks for each; a large demonstration 
table; cases for herbanium specimens, books, and supplies* 
blackboards, sinks, aquarium, and drip. A compound micro- 
scope dissecting instruments, and materials for study are 
furnished each student. 



142 Unbersity of Southern California 

For the study of Plant ^I^^.^^J^ 
well equipped. This equ.pment cons s^ recent y p 

types of appa *™ *?\%£™£ ' Xch fs self -recording; 
Cambridge Improved Auxa nomete . r ' „ mnut ationometer, Det- 
Ganong's Clinostat, Cambridge OrcumnutatK.no , 

mer's Gas Diffusion Apparatus, Pfeffer sUas £PP ^ 

meter, Cambridge xvcap , a f ther pieces of 

recording Transpnrometer and a ^number f ot P 

apparatus for w0 [ kmg R 2U the lSesHmp roved microscopes 
For research work ^otoy thetatetjj. tempera- 

with oil-immersion objectives cam, era lu ida w _ 

ture stage, -Urometers and other acs p 

^^^^ - Botanical 



literature. 



necessary equipment for ™?rk inbact, alogy 

tables, cupboards, and a case so re =, instrumen ts, including 
the necessary materials, apparatus and instru , u _ 

BB-8 Bausch and Lomb microscopes a e ^""Jjea 
dent. For Ph y-^logy the Ubon tory *-£%. 
reagents and apparatus ™ ce ""J tometer , dissecting in- 
work, such as microscope h"™^^ d Phys ; logical 
struments, etc. A complete set of .the ti Embry0 l O gy 

necessary to carry on successful work. 

The Biological Research Laboratory 15,17 feet adjoins^ 
office of the department, **£ ^%££ to advanced work 
me nt of these rooms « g«* ^ copes of German and 
along special lines. The best m _ ^ h and L omb, 



The College of Liberal Arts 143 

camera, and numerous microscope accessories and instru- 
ments are provided. 

The Biological Lecture Room is 32x36 feet with raised 
seats. It has a seating capacity of about two hundred and is 
provided with skylight and fitted with screens for darkening 
to adapt it to the use of the electric projection apparatus and 
stereopticon that form part of the equipment. The lecture 
desk, which is fitted with drawers and cupboards, can be 
adjusted instantly for gas or water for demonstration pur- 
poses, this room, as well as all others, is well supplied with 
electric lights. 

The wide halls have been provided with glass cases in 
which are placed a large collection of birds,' mollusks, and 
alcoholic specimens for demonstration and study. The col- 
lection of mollusks is very complete, representing over eight- 
een thousand specimens. 

The Marine Biological Station of the University of South- 
ern California is housed in the aquarium and auditorium 
buildings at Venice. The research laboratory has places for 
eight investigators, and the combined laboratory and lecture 
room for the summer course in marine biology will accom- 
modate forty students. In the large aquarium room there 
are forty aquaria with sides of plate glass and one large cen- 
tral concrete basin. A library and a reference collection of 
the local fauna and flora are being established. 

The Venice pier and breakwater have been made a biologi- 
cal reservation by a special act of the Venice city trustees. 
Here are colonies of abalones and other animals brought 
from a distance for study and experimentation. One and one- 
half miles of canal, with water of lower salinity than the 
neighboring sea, give opportunity for acclimatization experi- 
ments. 

In the Pacific Ocean the immediate field of investigation 
embraces the Santa Barbara Islands, extending from San 
Clemente, eighty miles to the south, to San Miguel, one hun- 
dred and thirty miles to the west. The inshore waters are 
shallow, reaching the one hundred fathom line ten miles 
directly seaward to the southwest, a depth of three hundred 
and fifty fathoms about five miles beyond. At sixty miles 
from Venice, somewhat to the west of Santa Barbara Islands, 
lies an oval basin twenty miles long and ten miles in width' 
having a depth of eight hundred and thirty fathoms. The 
Anton Dohrn, a launch of thirty-five feet over all and of ten 
feet beam, has been built for the exploration of these waters. 



144 University of Southern California 

dred students; that for quan itat.ve chem stry ^to y^ 

that for organic chemistry ^™f & " st ™&*n laboratory 

atones are thoroughly equipped wUh m d ' n & 

tables, water, gas, apparatus and chemical sty 

large number of ^^r.^ro«, well 

ern laboratory. The balance roo ana i vt ical balances. 

lighted and equipped ,^* 5^^^ of apparatu. 

The storeroom is supplied with a lar : qua y _ 

and chemicals of the best make A special rese 

heat <J««™ ,na f "vCSUnhu, apparatus, and a Ihmno- 

laboratories. 

The Assay and Metallurgical ^Laboratory °^*£% 
room in the Chemistry Building The quipm^ ^ _ 

rock crushers ore grindes of seve ^ ^ q{ ^ 

ing fans, all dnven ^^S The equipment includes appar- 

laboratory is modern in every detail. 

collections of specimens >m g o logy an ^d mm gy^ 

accumulated during the past years and ^ ^ 

and arranged so as to must £* ™ e ™. * those donate d 

in these subject. Among a > -llectio^.^ and Pofessor 
by the Rev. C. K. rattee, mi» j Stephen Bowers. 

Dickinson, and the one P^chased from D,^ ■ S ep 
A collection of one hundred type ] s ° lls ^^ work is 
opportunity for comparison and study. Laboraoy^ ^ 

carried on in making "^^Xral industries. A 



The College of Liberal Arts 145 

identification of soils. The Library contains a large and 
valuable collection of reference works on the geology, min- 
eralogy, physiography, soils and climate of California. The 
collection loaned by Professor Bailey includes a complete set 
of the U. S. geologic folios and soil maps of the State; bulle- 
tins on the geology, oil, and mining industries; and many 
maps, charts, photographs, and lantern slides. 

ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The Faculty of the College of Liberal Arts, recognizing 
that physical training is both hygienic and educative, desires 
to encourage every reasonable effort in the direction of phys- 
ical development consistent with well-rounded manhood and 
womanhood. On its hygienic side physical training should 
aid the body in all its functions, develop a symmetrical form, 
correct deformity as far as possible, and afford recreation. 
In its educative function it should afford the discipline nec- 
essary for self-control, both mental and moral. Athletic 
sports are encouraged for their value in developing the body, 
and in furnishing a means of pleasant recreation as well as a 
source of social and ethical culture. 

Gymnasium and Athletic Grounds. The gymnasium, the 
three tennis courts, the basketball courts, the inclosed athletic 
field, with its cinder path, turf football field, and the bleach- 
ers with eighty-two hundred sittings, furnish ample facilities 
for physical training and outdoor sports. In addition to this 
the University has free use of the limitless facilities provided 
by the immense athletic field of Exposition Park, situated 
just three blocks south of the University. 

The gymnasium has been fitted with appliances for the 
proper development of the body. The necessary apparatus 
of the newest and most approved designs has been provided. 
The students have all the advantages of the gymnasium, with 
baths', lockers, and dressing room accommodations. M*n and 
women occupy the building at different periods of the day, 
and have baths, locker rooms, and dressing rooms in separate 
wings of the gymnasium building. 

A complete equipment is provided for each form of exer- 
cise. Galleries will afford audience room for special gym- 
nastic exercises when such are open to the public. 

Each student, on entering the department, undergoes a 
thorough physical examination, in order that his or her phy- 
sical condition may be known, and suitable exercises pre- 



146 University of Southern California 

scribed. Various strength tests and measurements are given; 
the heart, lungs, sight, and hearing are examined; and the 
utmost eautioni's ufed in the advice given regarding individ- 
ual exercise. One examination during each semester is re- 
auired the latter demonstrating any improvement or change 
in the' student's physical condition. Anthropometric cards 
and charts are platted for students when desired 

All athletic and team contests are under the close super- 
vision of the director, and no student is permitted to compete 
In games or contests whose physical examination shows that 

he A n r y S JerSon U who desires to enter athletic contests must 
attain a certain standard of scholarship before being per- 
mitted to participate. 

DEBATING 

The University provides opportunity for all who , w£h to 
engage in debating. During the last "a8on-19lS-1916-&e 
schedule of intercollegiate debates included Stanford Uni- 
versity Texas University, Arizona University, Montana Uni- 
versity Pomona College, Occidental College and Denver 
University. In addition the Freshman teams meet a num- 

he El:S::trTZs are conducted early each academic year 
and prizes totaling $60.00 are offered under the auspices of 
Delta Simna Rho Fraternity, to the contestants ranking high- 
est in "sincere and effective speaking." These men together 
wih others properly qualifying, represent the Un iversity 
in regular intercollegiate debate. (See under Prizes. ) 

Bowen Foundation for Debating Prizes. Through the gen- 
eros°tv of Mr. William M. Bowen six cups are presented 
annually to those students of Hie institution who show ex- 
ceotional ability as sincere and effective speakers in the regu- 
lar debaingtryouts conducted to select the members of the 
various intfrcollegiate debating teams of the University. 

RELIGIOUS PRIVILEGES 

The moral atmosphere surrounding the indent is excep- 
tionally good. The Young Men's Christian Association and 
the Young Women's Christian Association are active and 
effective if social and religious life. These Associations ho d 
weekly meetings, open to all students. Assemblies are held 
Tt 11 40 on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Attendance 



The College of Liberal Arts 147 

is required of all students in the College. In addition to 
the chapel services, courses of special addresses are delivered 
from time to time. A student prayer-meeting is held every 
Thursday at 7 p. m. These privileges constitute a good 
Christian atmosphere in which to lay the foundation of char- 
acter. Students are expected to attend some church each 
Sabbath, and are advised to join some Sunday class for the 
study of the Bible. 

The University Methodist Episcopal Church is located near 
the campus, and is one of the most prosperous churches in 
the city. The Baptists and Presbyterians and other denom- 
inations, also have churches in the near vicinity. These 
advantages, together with fine public school privileges, make 
the University section of the city a very desirable place for 
the residence of families seeking educational opportunities. 

HOUSING 

Requirements as to the housing of students living away 
from home are in the hands of a special Faculty Committee. 
These must be complied with before the student may be con- 
sidered settled. 

THE WOMEN'S HALLS 

Under the management of the Women's Club, dormitories 
are provided for young women, where every home comfort 
and protection is assured to those coming from a distance, 
at the lowest possible rates. A cash deposit of ten dollars 
($10.00) is required for the reservation of a room. Students 
are expected to supply their own bed linen. 

Women students who do not live at home (that is, with 
parents or legal guardians) are required to live in one of the 
women's halls. Where exceptions are necessary, either from 
lack of room in the dormitories or other reasons, written ap- 
proval of other lodgings must be secured from parents or 
guardian, and filed with the University. 

A student vacating a room before the close of the semester 
will be charged for room and board until the end of the 
semester, or until the vacancy has been fill'ed by an incoming 
student. Therefore, for the benefit of the outgoing student, 
notice of an intention to withdraw should be given at the 
earliest possible moment. 



148 University of Southern California 

No lunch is served at the Women's Hall on school dag 
All students may secure luncheon at the University Cafeteria 
on the campus, the expense of which is not included in the 
charge for board and room at the Women s Hall. 

Further inquiries and all applications fo '„ roon \ s .. sh °? ld .^ 
addressed to Mrs. H. Trowbridge, 1110 West Washington 
Street, Los Angeles. 

THE WOMEN'S CLUB 

A society of ladies interested in the welfare of the students 
w£ orgfnLd ten years ago under the name ^ Women . 
Auxiliary to supplement in all practical ways the plans ot 
fhe Sersity authorities for the comfort and "nvemence 
of the student body. The reception room and the girls rest 
room were furnished by their efforts; the women's dormi- 
oriTs Ire under their supervision; and the University Cafe- 
Jeria for students and Faculty, under their judicious manage- 
ment is a great success. . 

There are about one hundred members, and a meeting is 
heW on the s econ d Tuesday afternoon of each month. Moth- 
ers of students and ladies interested in the University are 
cord°all?"nvited to' become members of this growing or- 
RaniLatL Last year the Women's Auxiliary was reor- 
Snized as the Women's Club of the University and jomed 
both the State and National Federations of Women s Clubs. 
Tn December 1914, an Alumnae Department was formed, 
or ^heTurpose of' keeping up the interest of the women 
graduates in the affairs of the University, of supplying a 
fond of unity for the women now taking graduate work and 
of furthering in all possible ways the interests of the Cm 
versky Only those women who have graduated are eligible 
lo fu 1 membership, but any woman who has taken one year s 
work at the University may become an associate member. 

The officers of the Women's Club make the following 
statement of their chief purpose: 

"The present aim of the Club is the erection of a large 
hall of Sence?in place of the rented buildings now being 
Sed The plan s to build around a garden-court on which 
a 1 looms and sleeping porches will open In this , projext 
the Club seeks to enlist the co-operation of every one inter- 
ested in higher education in the South, irrespective of de- 
nominational affiliation." 



The College of Liberal Arts 149 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND 
PUBLICATIONS 

There are four literary societies connected with the College 
of Liberal Arts, the Aristotelian and Comita for men, and 
the Athena and Clionian for women. Of these, the Aris- 
totelian and the Athena societies, which date back to the 
early years of the University, have large and well-furnished 
halls in which to hold their meetings. All of the societies 
are in flourishing condition. Once a week each conducts 
programs consisting of debates, papers, readings, music, dis- 
cussions on current topics of vital interest, and drill in par- 
liamentary law. Periodically all the societies meet in joint 
assembly under the auspices of the Civic League for the dis- 
cussion of problems of civic interest and for the furthering 
of civic righteousness. 

Among the students in the College of Liberal Arts are 
one national fraternity, two national sororities, six local fra- 
ternities, and four local sororities. The aggregate member- 
ship is over two hundred. One of the noteworthy features 
of these societies is their spirit of good-fellowship with those 
members of the student body who have no such affiliations. 
The Greek letter societies are under the supervision of a 
special Faculty committee. A system of grading by the Uni- 
versity authorities encourages them to attain a high standard 
of scholarship. 

'The Trojan" is a newspaper managed by a well-organized 
staff of undergraduates under the direction of the department 
of Journalism, and devoted to news articles and announce- 
ments of events of interest to the University, and to editorial 
discussions of moment to the student body. 

"El Rodeo" is the title of the college annual of descriptive 
articles, photographs, and cartoons, including all phases of 
the life in the College of Liberal Arts, and produced by the 
Junior class of each year. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Tuition, a semester, payable in advance $50.00 

(Five dollars of the above is registration fee and is 
not refundable. Special rates will be made to stu- 
dents registering for less than eleven units.) 

Diploma Fee, payable 30 days before graduation 5.00 



1 50 University of Southern California 

Laboratory Fees, per semester: 

Assaying (to be arranged with Treasurer) 

Biology, each course requiring laboratory work 4.UU 

Chemistry: . ^ .. • iqqq 

Each laboratory course of 2 or 3 units « i «- 

Each laboratory course of one unit ^ 

Civil Engineering 117 ; "": 

Electrical Engineering, any laboratory experimental ^ 

course *; V"*" o'nn 

Journalism, courses requiring use of typewriter £UU 

Psychology (laboratory) - 

Physics: 400 

Any one unit course - ^ 

Any two unit course '"'""' "i" a an 

Surveying, field work one unit, $2.50; two umts 4.00 

Students in Chemistry deposit a breakage fee of $5.00 per 
semester which, after deducting the cost of goods broken, 
will be refunded at the close of the year. 

Ministers in the regular work of any evangelical denomina- 



full 



Hoc may have tuition for their children at half rates 

A discount of ten per cent of the tuition is allowed^! 
two or more students from the same family are paying 

tU Abortion of the tuition may be refunded in case a student 
is compelled to cancel his registration on account of sickness 
or fo™ other reasons acceptable to the administration such 
as military service. No refund will be made for an absence 
of less than half a semester. 

Charges for Graduate work are made according to the 
above schedule, except that students who have Received their 
Bachelor's degree from the University of Southern California 
are granted twenty-five per cent discount on tuition 

Ten per cent discount is granted on the Tui ion of all pub- 
lic school teachers (in active work) who are taking more than 
two hours in the University. 

Discounts apply only to tuition, not to registration fee or 

lab Th r e at Univ f :r e s S lty reserves the right to change any of the 
rates or discounts printed in this year book, without notice. 
Board and furnished rooms can be secured in private fami- 
lies at from five to seven dollars per week._ Furnished rooms, 
accommodating two students, cost from eight to twelve dol- 
lars per month. 



The College of Liberal Arts 151 

Other expenses incident to college life vary with the habits 
and circumstances of the student. They are not of necessity 
so great as to be burdensome to persons in moderate circum- 
stances. 

The Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds conducts a 
free rental bureau for the benefit of all students and has all 
available rooms in the vicinity of the University campus 
listed and on file. The Young Men's Christian Association 
and the Young Women's Christian Association conduct an 
employment bureau for the purpose of aiding needy and 
worthy students who are desirous of earning a part of their 
expenses while in college. The president of these Associa- , 
tions will be glad to answer any requests for information ad- 
dressed to them. 

A number of students each year find it possible to earn 
enough while attending the University to pay their expenses 
for the year. However, the University recommends that a 
student provide himself with resources sufficient for the ex- 
penses of one semester before registering for full work. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following scholarships have been founded in the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts. Others contemplate the establishment 
of prizes and scholarships, and it is earnestly hoped that soon 
a considerably larger number can be offered. Friends of the 
University can greatly add to its attractiveness in this way. 

The James Hugh Johnston Scholarship was founded in per- 
petuity by Mrs. Anna H. Johnston, of Pasadena, in memory 
of her deceased husband, and is for the benefit of needy 
students. Mrs. Johnston will name the incumbent when she 
desires; otherwise this will be done by the authorities of 
the University. 

The Spence Scholarship was founded by the Hon E F 
Spence in his life time, and is devoted to the use of needy 
students in the San Diego district, upon the recommendation 
ot the District Superintendent of that district. 

The A. M. Peck Scholarship was founded by A. M Peck 
of Compton. 

u T ^ e o°, nta f i0 Scholarshi P is for the benefit of the Ontario 
High School. 

The Zana T. Stevens Scholarship was founded by the 
*ev. F. G. H. Stevens, September 16th, 1907, in memory of 



\ 52 University of Southern California 

Zana E. Stevens, nee Terpenning, of the class of 190L This 
ofttti^^ 

member of eta I- O. C. class » ««» ■ , for , ame . 

\i sz£tti££&z !h «" "«■"- ,rom 

any female students who apply. 

The A M Hough Scholarship was founded by Mrs. Anna 
G Hough M?y "fh, 1908, by the payment of one thousand 
dollars." This scholarship is to be pe xpetuab an d » £ be 
used to aid some student each year m the Z o lege o 
Arts -ho is Preparmg to enter the ^n try of th^ 

»g^AW^ authorized to use the 
fcho^htto benefit any worthy student needing such hdp 

The George I. Cochran Scholarship was founded by George 
I Cochran who names the student receiving the benefit 

The Abbie Mills Scholarship was founded by M.ss Abbie 
M S by to Payment of $1000. The scholarship u .perpetual, 
Se President to name the student receiving the benefit. 

The Marion McKinley Bovard Scholarship nj» founded 

b / ^ r U^iS° Ug Tbr sum e oTonl ^an^nars 
pSm^t^SlS-ship perpetual. The beneficiary ; mus 
L selected from eligible relatives of the first P ™ d «* 

Children of missionaries are eligible for the use 
^tiac Sunderland Scholarship was founded by Mr, 

by ng Mr eS Ke% eS at StoSm, Sweden, July, 1912. He repre- 



The College of Liberal Arts 153 

sented the University of Southern California at the Inter- 
national Olympic contests and won the first place in the 
one hundred and ten meter high-hurdle race, time, 15.1 sec- 
onds. The scholarship is perpetual. 

The S. P. and Helen B. Mulford Scholarship was founded 
by Mr. and Mrs. Mulford, August 26, 1914 (their twenty- 
ninth wedding anniversary), by the payment of one thousand 
dollars as a thank offering to their Heavenly Father. The 
beneficiary may be named by the founders, or either of them. 
In case this right is not exercised the president of the Uni- 
versity may name the beneficiary. 

The Zeta Tau Alpha Scholarship was founded by the local 
chapter of the Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority in February, 1917. 
The beneficiary mayor may not be a member of the sorority 
founding this scholarship. Any woman student in the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts is eligible. Application for the use of 
this scholarship should be made to the President of the 
University, who, in consultation with the Zeta Tau Alpha 
Sorority, will make the selection. 

The Rhodes Scholarship. Attention is called to the op- 
portunities presented by the scholarships founded by the 
late Cecil Rhodes, of South Africa. Each of these is worth 
$1500 per year for three years, the term to be spent at Oxford 
University. To be eligible to appointment candidates must 
pass a qualifying examination. Full particulars will be given 
on application to the Rhodes Scholarship Committee of the 
Faculty of Liberal Arts. 

The John Thompson Memorial Scholarship was founded 
by the Baraca Class of the First M. E. Church of South 
Pasadena in memory of John Thompson, a former member 
of the class. It consists of one year's tuition in the College 
of Liberal Arts, the incumbent to be the man in the Senior 
Class of the South Pasadena High School who has made the 
highest record for scholarship for four years. The teacher of 
this class is Mr. Charles E. Carver, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity. 

PRIZES 
The Lottie Lane Prize, established by Mrs. Charlotte A. 
Thompson as a memorial to a deceased daughter, is an 
elaborate gold medal to be presented each year at Commence- 
ment to that member of the graduating class who shall have 
maintained the highest general average in scholarship 
throughout the whole college course. Students who have 
taken more than four academic years to complete the course, 



1 54 " University of Southern California 

and those who have received credit for work done elsewhere 
than in this College, are not eligible for this ^ prize. TJ» 
medal was awarded in 1917 to Emma Reynolds Hutchinson. 
The University Oratorical Prize of a one-semester schol- 
arship in til junior or senior year of the College of Liberal 
Arts (value, fifty dollars) is offered to that student who 
represents the University in the annual Intercollegiate Ora- 
toricaT Contest; and an additional one-semester scholarship 
n the junior or' senior year is awarded if the said "prcento- - 
tive wins first place in the Intercollegiate Contest. The 
scholarship is not transferable. _ 

The Intercollegiate Prohibition Oratorical Contesl : Prize 
of one semester in the junior or senior year of the College 
n { t iherat Arts (value, fifty dollars) is offered to mat 
Ident who Represents the University in the annual Interco - 
egfate Prohibition Oratorical Contest; and an additional one- 
semester scholarship in the junior or senior year is awaked 
if the said representative wins first place in the Intercolle 
giate Prohibition Contest. The scholarship is not trans- 
ferable. 
Bowen Foundation for Debating Prizes. See debating. 

GIFTS TO THE UNIVERSITY 

The Hough Fund. This is a fund of $85,000 given by Rev 
AsahelM Hough, deceased, and his wife, Anna G. Hough of 
T ofAneeles It is to be held by the University in perpetuity, 
an°d th n e ge inc S ome is to be used for current «p£« -of *< 
College of Liberal Arts, or as the Board of Trustees may 
annually direct. 

The Hazzard Professorship. Rev. A. C. Hazard has given 
to the University property valued at $30 000 for the endow- 
ment of a professorship in the English Bible. 

The Merryman Professorship. Mr T. D. Merryman has 
given to the University property valued at $25,000 for the 
endowment of a professorship in Mathematics. 
The Hartupee Gift. This gift consists of $22,500. 
The Carnegie Gift. This gift consists of $25,000. 
For further information address. 
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, 
Los Angeles, California. 



SUMMER SESSION 

Announcement 

The thirteenth annual Summer Session of the College of 
Liberal Arts of the University of Southern California will be 
held at the College of Liberal Arts on University Avenue, 
and at the Venice Marine Station, from Tune 24 to August 3, 
1918. 

Thursday, Friday and Saturday, June 20, 21 and 22, will be 
regularregistration days at the Registrar's office, and as far 
as possible, students are asked to register on these days. 

Visiting Professors 

Following the custom of other years," the University has 
securedthe services of a number of eminent educators who 
will assist the members of the regular faculty in the instruc- 
tion of the Summer Session. 

Miss Carolyn Alchin, College of Music, University of 
Southern California. Harmony and Ear Training. 

Superintendent G. Vernon Bennett, Pomona. Occupa- 
tional Education. 

Mr. Louis F. D. Briois, Orton School, Pasadena. French. 

Dr. Richard Burton, University of Minnesota. English 
Literature. 

Dr. C. Ward Crampton, Department of Education, New 
York City. Playground work. 

Miss Julia E. Crane, Crane Normal Institute, Potsdam, 
N. Y. Public School Music Methods. 

Dr. Harold W. Fairbanks, Berkeley, Cal. Geography. 

Dr. George E. Howard, University of Nebraska. Sociology 
and Political Science. 

Mrs. Alice O. Hunnewell, Los Angeles State Normal. Read- 
ing and Public Speaking. 
Mr. Vincent Jones, Manual Arts High School. Music. 
Mr. Torsten Magnuson, San Fernando High School. Eco- 
nomics. 

Dr. Ernest Carroll Moore, President Los Angeles State 
Normal School. Education. 

Mr. D. W. Pollard, City Boy Scouts Executive. Scout 
Work. 

Dr. Herbert I. Priestley, University of California. Latin 
American History. 



1 56 University of Southern California 

Don Felipe M. dC Setien, Leland Stanford Jr. University. 
Latin. . . ... 

Dr. Louise Stanley, University of Missouri. Household 

Science. 

Mr. Will S. Thompson, California State Fish and Game 
Commission. Commercial Fisheries. 

Miss C. Adelaide Trowbridge, College of Music, University 
of Southern California. Harmony. 

Purpose of the Summer School 

Courses offered in the Summer Session are designed to 
meet the needs of the following classes: 

1 Undergraduates and graduates of schools and colleges. 

2 Teachers, including those in grade schools, high 
schools, and other institutions of learning. 

3. Persons desiring (as auditors) to attend courses with- 
out doing full or regular work, or taking examinations. 
Those enrolled as auditors do not receive University credits. 

Admission Requirements 

The admission requirements to the Summer Session are 
for all except those enrolled as auditors, un.forni i with the 
admission requirements to the regular sessions of the College 
of Liberal Arts. 

Credits 

Six units of College credit represent full work for the 
Summer Session In case an undergraduate student carries 
fucTssfully more than a full course, before additional ^credit 
may be obtained application must be made t°the Registrar 
and^uch application must be fay orably ac ted upon by the 
Scholarship Committee. By a ruing of t''^ 1 '^ 
six units is, as a rule, the maximum credit for a graduate 
•student in a single Summer Session. .... 

All classes recite five times a week unless otherwise indi- 
cated Five recitations or ten laboratory hours per week for 
x weeks entitle the student to two umts of credit. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

of the Registration Fee entit 
ly of the courses as he is qua! 

Registration fee ■--- - $ 15 - 00 



The payment of the Registration Fee entitles a student to 
enroll in as many of the courses as he is qualified to carry. 



Summer Session 157 

Laboratory fees — 

Chemistry - . 10.00 

(A breakage deposit of $6.00 is also re- 
quired. This is returned, less breakage.) 
Botany 400 

Physics 4.00 

The University reserves the right to change any of the 
rates or discounts printed in this year book, without notice. 

Summer Session Announcement 

The Announcement of the Summer Session is now ready 
for distribution. It contains full information concerning the 
work offered and may be obtained by application to the 
Registrar, 



THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 
AND SURGEONS 

FOREWORD 

The University of Southern California, in establishing and 
bJldingupthe various professional colleges wa ^ one of the 

Seal department of this University -was founded *e Trus_ 
tees placed, themselves on recor *or »ngh e r medi^ 
tion, declaring for a three-year course wn fa 

Sntl? sSenT'plat ^meEl tpaSS upon a high 
prne'of'efficiency^aising its ^-trance re^ement t^one 
year of college work, in addition to the hign college 

beginning with session of l 91 ™!?^} Beginning with the 

work ^#AXiKi&»*» T 
session of 191 1 8 : ly . tms ,^;/. 1 < e f c Mother soecified requirements. 

vided in the articles of incorporation. 
Environment 
The advantages derived by the »««»'<£ «* J&fg 

already been noted. Anp . e1e „ : s essentially cosmopolitan. 

very best advantage. 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 
The Main College Building 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 159 

near the business center, is to be found the modern and 
commodious building of the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons. It was designed and erected especially for our use, 
and contains all of the elements of a modern and thoroughly 
up-to-date college hall. It is a three-story structure with 
basement, is built of brick with stone facings, and is prac- 
tically fireproof. 

In the basement are located the instantaneous water-heat- 
ing system; a furnace that conveys heated air to each depart- 
ment, with apparatus for forcing cool and pure air into each 
room when needed; storage tanks for anatomical material; 
a receiving and preparation room for the same; a stack 
room for library books and unbound journals; and a work 
room for the caretaker. 

On the first floor are located the college offices, the library 
and reading room; two chemical laboratories; four labora- 
tories for physiology and pharmacology, thoroughly equipped 
with all modern apparatus and appliances; one lecture room, 
and one Research Laboratory. 

. Located on the second floor are six Pathological, Bacte- 
riological, Histological, and Embryological laboratories, 
which have east, north and west exposures, affording an 
abundance of light, and are well heated and equipped with 
all modern appliances. Glass-covered tables are arranged 
around the north and west exposures, and all the latest 
apparatus has been installed. Each student is supplied with 
a microscope (Bausch and Lomb), with oil-immersion lens 
for use when required. Private laboratories form a part of 
the main laboratory hall, thus affording opportunity for 
special private research. On the second floor are also located 
one large amphitheatre, seated with two hundred modern 
opera chairs; also equipped with one of the latest projecto- 
scopes; one lecture hall, seated with opera chairs; a museum- 
and a chart room, supplied with imported charts, manikins', 
etc., arranged for use in various illustrative and didactic 
work. There are to be found upon the shelves of the College 
Museum many rare and valuable pathological specimens. 

On the third floor is located the Anatomical Department 
complete in every detail. Opening into the main Anatomical 
Department, by sliding doors, is the Anatomical Amphithe- 
atre, seated with opera chairs and equipped with a revolving 
table, so arranged that the most delicate operations and 
demonstrations upon the cadaver can be witnessed. 

Much new apparatus is constantly being added in all de- 
partments, stereopticon illustration being one of the lead- 
ing features in our primary departments. No expense has 
been spared to equip this college adequately for the teaching 
of medicine and surgery and for the comfort and health of 
teachers and students. 



1 60 University of Southern California 

The Teaching Staff 

The Faculty and the general teaching staff of the College 
of Physidans and Surgeons have been selected with scrupu- 
lous care and comprise many of the ablest teachers and lead- 
ns men and women in the West. Laboratory facilities and 
equipment alone are not sufficient for a thorough course 
Laboratories must be manned by competent and experienced 
teachers an" instructors, and in this College the laboratories 
are in charge of full paid teachers, noted for their abilities as 
teachers in their 'respective departments. 

CLINICAL FACILITIES 

COUNTY HOSPITAL CLINIC 

The Los Angeles County Hospital, the most extensive, 
modern and up-to-date county charity ™^ZVe\^nl' 
with fifteen hundred beds, detention wards for the insane, 
moSern medical, surgical and contagious wards a* depart- 
ments where all manner of ,surgical and medical cases may 
be studied and observed, offers rare and ample opportunities 
for the study of not only the ordinary diseases and condi- 
dons usually y met with in other large hospitals but also rare 
tropical and semi-tropical diseases that ^* in '° ^ S f ro m 
geles through our seaport, the gateway of entrance trom 
Panama, Hawaii, the Philippines, etc., the study of the dis- 
eases indigenous to which is most necessary at this time. 
Manv Interesting cases are met with daily, which afford un- 
usuaf ooportunkies for research, and it is the policy of the 
cHnkaHnd laboratory staffs in this college to foster -and 
assist students along these lines of work i he advantages 
to Ae student here consist not merely in his. walking through 
the wards observing patients, with an occasional opportunity 
to examine "but the Senior and Junior classes are divided 
nto seTtkons and these sections of two and three students 
are alio ted cases each week and are required to examine 
and diagnose by the latest and best known laboratory and 
clinical tests write histories covering the etiological factors 
of each dseasl and outline the treatment and management 
of riven cases throughout the different stages. This does 
not 8 however! end thf student's interest in the case which 
must b7 followed to convalescence or to autopsy in. which 
eTent the pathological findings are recorded and reported 
upon by the section in charge of the case, the efficiency, or 
otherwise, of work thus done being noted. _ 

The opportunities for the study and observation of acute 

Surgery are abundant, many cases being sent in from the 

Qty Hospital after first aid is given and hundreds of cases 

' be ng taken direct to the hospital for first aid and subsequent 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 161 

treatment The Ambulatory Surgical clinic is unexcelled 
and the Detention Wards afford a rich field for the study of 
the various forms of neurotic cases and conditions. Students 
i U U „ f 1! f t C0lle ^ are f e( l uir ed to serve their time in each and 
S i 5 e fi V M n ? US de P ar f tm ents_of this hospital, which offer 
so rich a field for clinical experience. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL AND CLINIC 
456 E. Washington St. (adjoining main College building) 

*J%°*. 1 tt°- 3 ?•."• each day, excepting Sundays and holi- 
days, the University Hospital and Clinic is open to the needy 
?ZZ\ D'fPensary staff of the college, composed of over 

twenty carefully selected professional men and women, give 
«lU e r y n eSt se ri c . es t°. those a PP ] ying for treatment, and, 

IIhi !f, 0f / hyM L\ ns , and Sur S e ons is located in a 
thulnc^r ""to-do neighborhood, therefore the clinics in 
his institution are of a decidedly high order, capable of giv- 
ing a complete case history, which enables the teacher and 
?W t« ?■ car f[ u "y study each case in detail and note from 
r^fino ?*£rtf- r " ff - Ct of , therapeutic measures. Material 
coming to this clinic is ample and of splendid quality. More 
than seventy patients apply daily for treatment in the various 
cre P a a s r ing entS Clink ' a " d the nUmber is s£a<% fo! 

A registered pharmacist is in charge of the prescription 
department and students are rotated in sections through this 
department and have practical experience under the direct 
instruction of the pharmacist in charge. Prescriptions are 

f C o°rZ^ nd K d - aS the . Ending physician order? o tod 
tormulas being permitted. 

t There is also a complete and up-to-date laboratory in con- 
nection with this clinic, this laboratory being in charge of 
the Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology in this school 
Th,s clinic makes a feature of laboratory work and students 
"frptated. in. sections through this laboratory. 

Ihis clinic is in charge of a clerk and sufficient trained 
nurses to bring its efficiency to a high order 

Each Senior student has set aside for his personal use a 
room for examining patients and writing histories and each 
pa lent is presented to the clinician, by the studen hn char«re 
with a complete history of his case. cnarge, 

OUT-PATIENT CLINIC 

latGlf 5 U ^ Pat -? nt 9 H T nic a Y ailabl e is extensive. The popu- 
lation of the city of Los Angeles has a large foreign and 
floating element, which contribute largely to our clmks "n 

^ d f P K rtmentS - ° Ur , clinics draw materially, though no" 
wholly by any means, from this available material and our 



162 University of Southern California 

Out-Patient Clinic, Obstetrical and General, is made abund- 
ant by conditions always existing in a city of over a half 
million population. The clinics maintain a well regulated 
system of assigning students from the upper classes to this 
out-patient service, of which complete record is kept and 
control maintained, the Obstetrical service being especially 
abundant. 

MATERNITY DISPENSARY 

The central headquarters for obstetrical clinics are known 
as the Maternity Dispensary and are located at 1320 Wilson 
Street, in the heart of the most thickly populated district 
of Los Angeles. During the senior year students are as- 
signed in rotation to the Dispensary, where they remain in 
residence for two weeks. While in residence students are 
provided with comfortable living and sleeping quarters. 
Obstetrical material is abundant, and during his service each 
student conducts at least twelve labors, under rigid super- 
vision, and witnesses from twenty to fifty labors in all the 
clinics of the Dispensary, County Hospital and allied insti- 
tutions. 

NINTH STREET DISPENSARY 
(Obstetrical Clinic) 

The Ninth Street Dispensary, located at the Neighborhood 
House Settlement, 2201^ East Ninth Street, is open on Fri- 
day mornings from 9 to 12 o'clock. At this clinic the stu- 
dent personally examines each patient and is given accurate 
instruction in obstetrical care and examinations before and 
after delivery. 

TEMPLE BLOCK DISPENSARY 
(Obstetrical Clinic) 

The Temple Block Dispensary, located at Room 12, Tem- 
ple Block, is open on Wednesday mornings from 9 to 12 
o'clock. At this clinic the student personally examines each 
patient and is given accurate instruction in obstetrical care 
and examination before and after, delivery. 

The three dispensaries above mentioned handle annually 
about 1500 obstetrical patients. Special attention is given to 
accurate obstetrical history writing, the student's findings 
being recorded on the standard obstetrical history sheets 
especially prepared for this department. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The Reading Room is located on the first floor and occu- 
pies a spacious, well lighted, heated and ventilated room, 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 163 

with east and north frontage, furnished with three large 
library tables-, around which students gather, and with com- 
fortable arm reading chairs placed around the room in suf- 
ficient numbers to accommodate as many students as desire 
to avail themselves of this splendid advantage. The stack 
room contains about two thousand medical volumes, many 
ot them the latest modern text and reference books, and is 
connected with the reading room by a direct stairway. Over 
eighty up-to-date (and many of them the leading) medical 
periodicals come regularly to our library table. The library 
is under the^ charge of a librarian and the Dewey library sys- 
tem of receiving, marking, listing and distributing is main- 
tained. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons being an integral 
part of the University of Southern California, our students 
have free access to the University library, containing over 
eighteen thousand volumes, covering the entire range of 
literary and scientific subjects. The Barlow Medical Library, 
containing about four thousand volumes, donated to the med- 
ical profession of Southern California, is available to the 
students of this college. The Los Angeles County Hospital 
also has a good medical library, to which our students have 
access. 

A very important feature of our library facilities is the 
large number of current medical journals from throughout 
the country coming regularly to our library tables, which 
enables the upper class students to keep in touch with cur- 
rent medical topics. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION, 

ADVANCED STANDING AND 

GRADUATION 

Session of 1917-18 

In accordance with the general advance in medical and 
surgical teaching and the necessary pre-medical training, the 
following requirements for entrance to the Freshman class 
have been established. Beginning with the 1917-18 session 
this College matriculates freshman students only on the fol- 
lowing standard: 

ltf£ nf^Vi? frOI £ $? Cr . edenti al Committee of the Univer- 
sity of Southern California, covering Requirements I. and 
U., as mentioned below: (Applicants for matriculation are 
requested to present their credentials to the Registrar of the 

Un vers! * f "* l ?" M ? ntg< ? mery > Thirty-fifth Street and 
University Avenue, Los Angeles. After securing entrance 

W^offir^&F 8 # e ^ qUeSt ^ t0 ^triculfte at Se 
No V«Z l ' -n u E - Wa . shl ,ngton St., as early as possible. 
No student will be matriculated after September 14th.) 



1 64 University of Southern California 

Requirement No. 1 

A diploma and transcript o^^^iffi JjJgS 
high school, 1 normal schoo , £ aca f* m s * n< £ r d J urS t in pri- 
sion evidence of ^e compleUon o^ a standa ^ ^ 

mary and intermediate grades and tor g embracing the 
gS^en^iVSeffione'd fclo^r an examination* in the 

following: Required Elective Total 

Units Units Units 

English— 2 

Reading and Practice ^ " "^ t 

Study and Practice 

Mathematics— 1 

Algebra to Quadratics.- 1 

Algebra (quadratic equations, 

the binominal theorem and 

the progressions) - 

Plane Geometry 

Solid Geometry - 

Trigonometry 



Latin — . . 

Grammar and Composition.. 

Caesar ~ 

Cicero 

Virgil 

Cornelius Nepos 



y 2 


V2 
1 

t/ 


V2 


72 
V2 


1 


'l 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 



-&*£* "accredited" ^S^^^^f^^V^ 
and universities means mstitut.onso *»« *fP of their respective states, 

« tht %SS^}S&^^^W^r 

^^^Z^^^&fi^^^ Certificate Board ' 

rte Association of American Umvers.ties. 

.This examination must be conducted .by and ^^^fl^ated. 
Board of Medical Examiners o the state m« Entran ce Examination 
or bv a duly authorized examiner ot the ^ ouc « c . ;td university, state 
Board or by the authorized examiner of an a«re dited d b c 

or otherwise; or by an examiner whose « rt 'ficates ^ a 

credited colleges or universities or by a menn ° c ^ The Credential 

Council of the Association of American Meica ^ g inte d by the 

Committee of the Un.vers.ty of Southern Lal,^^^ ^ ^ n 

g^l^Sh ofnfe'dtal students in the southern par, 

^ntt'the credit value rf^w^^f^ fclttj 
periods per week, each recitation Poodle- oe 01 a se £. 

Ss^ ^-ijsurag^^r,- L f om P fish 1 m 

&&S3U5^TM than ^sfxt^mmute hours, or thcr e.u.v- 



alent. 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 165 



Greek — 



Grammar and Composition.. .. 1 i 

Xenophen j j 

Homer ' J 

German or French 4 — 

Elementary 2 2 

Intermediate '. """J j 

Spanish — 

Elementary ' •__ 2 2 

Scandinavian — 

Elementary 2 2 

History- 
American History and Civil 

Government 1 < 

Greek and Roman History \ .. . '""{ 

Medieval and Modern His- 
tory 1 

English History j j 

Science 5 — 

Biology ^ i 

(Or Botany and Zoology, 

each) l . 

Chemistry ' i : 

Physics ;;;;; j { 

Physiography " "" t/ T/ 

Physiology Q p 

Agriculture •. 1 

Drawing " " i j 

Manual Training i { 

Domestic Science "__". { j 

Music (Appreciation or Harmony ...." 1 [ 

TotaI 7.. 28j? Jsy 2 

Requirement No. II. 

In addition to the above prescribed college Dreoaratorv 
units, two full years' work- (60 units) in the College^f S 

unhs WO of U f r Ll G o7 e Ge r r ma L n ati %^?^^ e su *f tuted ** the two required 
French or GermVinfcoWy"^ CXtra WOrk in 

each science course musf include^Sen^fof ^oraTory 'wor^^ 3 ° f 



166 



University of Southern California 



eral Arts of the University of Southern California, or other 
approved colleges or universities, including one year's work 
of college grade 6 in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Ger- 
man (or French), English, and Psychology, as indicated in 
the following schedule: 

(a) Requirements, two years' pre-medical college work: 



Lectures 

or 

Recitations 

per week 

Physics ... t 2 

Chemistry 2 

Biology 2 or 3 

German or French 8 4 or 3 

English 3 

Psychology 3 

Totals 16 



Laboratory 7 


Total 


Total 


Periods 


Hours 


Semester 


tfer 


per 


Hours 


week 


Semester 


per year 


2 


4 


8 


2 


4 


8 


2 or 1 


4 


8 




4 or 3 


8 or 6 




3 


6 




3 


6 



6 or 5 



22 or 21 



44 or 42 



The foregoing table may be expressed in class hours as 
follows: 



Total Hrs. 

Lectures 

or 

Recitations 

Physics 64 

Chemistry 64 

Biology 64 or 96 

German or French 8 ..128 or 96 

English 96 

Psychology 96 

Totals 512 



Additional elective units to complete course of 60 units. 



Total 




Total 


Hours 
Laborato 


ry 


Minimum Hrs. 
Didactic and 


Work 




Laboratory 


128 




192 


128 




192 


128 or 


64 


192 or 160 
128 or 96 

96 

96 


384 or 


320 


896 or 832 



6 The work of this preliminary college year must extend ^ through one 
college session of at least thirty-two weeks of actual instruction, including 
final examinations. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of 
this preliminary college year must be equal to the work done in the Fresh- 
man year in standard colleges and universities. 

7 The statement of units and of hours Of recitations as given in the lists 
presupposes that in each case one unit of preparatory work in that subject 
(two units in the case of German and French) has been offered for en- 
trance to the college course in question. If in the case of any subject 
except Physics (see note 9) this preparatory work has not been done, the 
deficiency must be made up in full during the course of the college year 
prior to matriculation in the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 



8 Each laboratory period must extend over at least two hours. 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 167 

Advanced Standing 

_ This College does not grant time-credit to students hold- 
ing a baccalaureate degree or a degree in Pharmacy or Dent- 

Kr tr ?* ? r ^"^ spent in any other than a regular College of 
Medicine and Surgery, the curriculum and course of which 
meet the requirements of the Association of American Medi- 
cal Colleges. 

A student who has previously matriculated with and has 
spent time in another accredited medical college, recognized 
as such by this institution, will be required to present to the 
JJean of this College a statement from the Dean of the college 
he has attended, stating that he has paid all dues and fees 
due said college; that he is free from all charges or demerits 
of whatever nature; and that he has satisfactorily completed 
the course of study prescribed by the curriculum of said 
college; and provided that the entrance requirements of the 
college from which he presents his credentials were equiva- 
lent to those of the Association of American Medical Colleges 
at that time, and that the course of study provided and set 
forth in each student year was equivalent to the requirements 
of this school; and provided further that the Judicial Council 
are satisfied with his credits and markings, taking into con- 
sideration his general average, which will include his per- 
centage of attendance upon all lectures, recitations, labor- 
atory work, and clinics, the student may then enter upon his 
work in the succeeding grade. Before advanced standing will 
be granted him, however, the Dean of this College will verify 
the students credentials. If they are found complete and 
satisfactory credit for the work will be entered upon the 
records of this college; but ( such advancement will not exempt 
the student from the final examination requirements exacted 
or all students applying for a degree from this College 

A student presenting credentials and credits from another 
mfn^ °ft' 5 eco f nize ^ °y this College, should bear in 
mind the fact that such credentials must show that the credits 
were received in the regular way, and in the regular course 
of instruction; and that the said course must have been regu- 
? r n aD fI n accordance with the requirements of the Associa- 
and ?L n en f U ?\^ 1 Colleges, the California State Law, 
fnrnil k °J M( ; dlcal Examiners of the State of Cali- 

lru,lu C /- dlt what ? ver wil1 be allowed for time not 

actually spent in a regular recognized medical college 

\c£rlul ent W ,u° h ^ S attende ? 1 one or more courses in a med- 
ial college otherwise reputable, but whose entrance require- 

nnuL*? T n u W e( l uivalent to those of this institution, 
notwithstanding he may meet our class examination require- 
ments, will not be granted advanced standing, unless the pre- 
liminary^ qualifications of said students were equivalent to 

n the q coll^ ent f S ° f thi , S - C , 0l V ege at the date of matriculation 
m the college from which he comes. 



168 University of Southern California 

Graduates of medical colleges whose requirements were 
equivalent to those prescribed by the Association of Amer- 
ican Medical Colleges, and whose credentials are recognized 
by the Board of Medical Examiners of the State of Califor- 
nia, will be admitted to the Senior class without examination; 
provided, however, that the curriculum of study of the afore- 
said college covered three full years, and provided also that 
the requirements for matriculation were equivalent to the re- 
quirements of the Association of American Medical Colleges 
at the time of his matriculation. Should, however, the college 
from which the applicant graduated have prescribed and 
required at the time of his graduation only a two years' 
course, the applicant will be matriculated in the Junior year 
and will be required to pursue the course outlined in our 
Junior year schedule, provided that the matriculant is work- 
ing for a degree from this school, but not otherwise. Juniors 
and Seniors of this College are required to attend at least 80 
per cent of all clinics throughout the Junior and Senior years. 

To graduates and students of Colleges of Homeopathic or 
Eclectic Medicine will be granted time-credits for as many 
years as they attended those colleges, provided they have 
met the previous requirements of the Association of American 
Medical Colleges, and that they pass an examination in 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics, as prescribed by this Col- 
lege. All students admitted to advanced standing must show 
credentials of having passed regular examinations in the 
branches taken in the year preceding the one they desire to 
enter, or must pass such examination in this College. 

REGULATION GOVERNING THE COURSE OF 
STUDY 

The curriculum of study in this College is divided in a 
manner that enables the student to complete his minors, 
together with the majority of the laboratory courses, during 
the Freshman and Sophomore years, thus enabling the Junior 
and Senior students to avail themselves of the large amount 
of didactic, recitative, and clinical work that composes the 
last two years of the course. 

The school year is divided into semesters, an examination 
being held at the end of each semester. 

Each student is required to attend 80 per cent of all ex- 
ercises in every annual course of study for which he seeks 
credit. No student will be given credit on examination unless 
he shall have attained a grade of at least 75 per cent, or its 
equivalent in some other marking system, and no student 
will be graduated unless he shall have attained a passing 
grade on examination of at least 80 per cent in each and all 
subjects taught and examined upon in this college. 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 169 

The carrying and removal of conditions in all cases will 
be governed by the rules and regulations promulgated from 
time to time by the Association of American Medical Col- 
leges and in conformity with the State Law of California. 
When not in conflict with these rules and regulations a stu- 
dent, to advance from one grade to the next higher grade, 
must pass at least all but two of the required examinations 
in the branches or subjects taught in that year, except that 
in passing from the Junior to the Senior year, all of the re- 
quired examinations must be passed. Should he fail, at the 
beginning of the succeeding session, to pass tjie examination 
in the subjects in which he has been conditioned as stated 
above, he may enter the higher class as a conditioned student 
for that one session only, and if he does not remove the said 
conditions by the end of the session, he must repeat the work 
of the year in which the said conditions were imposed. 

No student can, therefore, become a conditioned or an 
unconditioned member of the Sophomore class unless he has 
passed at least all but two of the required Freshman year 
examinations when that year closes; nor of the Junior class 
unless he shall have passed the Freshman year examinations, 
and, in addition, at least all but two of the Sophomore year 
examinations at the close of that year; nor of the Senior class 
unless he shall have passed all of the Freshman, Sophomore 
and Junior year examinations. This College does not permit 
the carrying of conditions into the Senior year. 

This College reserves the right to refuse admission to any 
student, or to terminate the attendance of any student, at any 
time, for what may appear to the Judicial Council to be good 
and sufficient cause, as inefficiency, conduct unbecoming a 
gentleman, or conduct not conducive to the morale of the 
class or institution; and also to refuse a student the privilege 
of any special or final examination, for cause, as above stated. 

Students will not be permitted to substitute private work 
in any branch for the regular college work prescribed in our 
curriculum, except under the direct supervision of an in- 
structor designated or appointed by the Dean. Examinations 
in work so done will be conducted by the professor to whose 
department it belongs. No markings nor credits from private 
instructors will be recognized. 

A student entering this College will be required to conform 
to all rules and regulations of the College as oromulgated 
from time to time by the Dean. 

A student who is under suspension or expulsion from an 
accredited medical college will not be matriculated in this 
institution without the written consent of the college impos- 
ing such suspension or expulsion. 

A student defacing or injuring the propertv of this College 
will be required to make due reparation for same. 



1 70 University of Southern California 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The applicant for the degree of Doctor o* Medicine must 
wi fulfilled all the requirements as set forth in this an 
"nrncinSand *^«^&%t<%g£ ^muYt 

1 He must have attained the age of twenty-one years and 
"have a good moral character. 

2. He must .have notified the. Dean on or before .the -.6rst 
day of April of the college year, in writing, of his >ntentmn to 

1 He must have previously met all the matriculation re- 

tiiP "Dean regarding his standing and his pronciency ui ^ 
brandies 'completed^ either by examination or otherwise, as 
the Judicial Council may elect. ■ _ • 

4 He must have completed the required courses in all the 

curriculum. , , - 

A We must undergo a written final examination (or both 
written and oraMf required) in all departments Eac ^ pap r f 
mus be written in English and the penmanship, orthogra- 
phy punctuation, and general style and characteristics of 
each paper will be considered. 

7. He must be free from demerit marks must have dis- 
rW^ed all conditions in each and every department, ana 
must be present at the Commencement Exercises, unless 
excused in writing by the Dean. 

8 Beginning with Session 1918-19, candidates fo.^«e 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 171 

COMBINED SEVEN-YEAR COURSE FOR THE 
DEGREE OF A.B. AND M.D. 

Students who have matriculated in the College of Liberal 
Arts of the University, and who plan to study medicine, may 
so combine the four-year course for the A.B. degree with the 
four-year course for the M.D. degree as to take both degrees 
in seven years. 



COMBINED COURSE FOR THE DEGREE OF A.M. 
AND M.D. 

Students holding the A.B. degree from recognized colleges 
and who enter the Freshman class of the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, may matriculate in the Graduate Depart- 
ment of the College of Liberal Arts, thus becoming candi- 
dates for the A.M. degree. Registration in the Graduate 
School may be made at any time before the opening of the 
Junior year. The candidate pursues advanced study along 
some special line and submits a thesis embodying original 
research. The degree of Master of Arts is given to the 
candidate upon the completion of the requirements for the 
advanced degree. 1 



PLACES OF ASSOCIATION AND RECREATION 

The students of medicine in this College, as in other medi- 
cal institutions throughout the country, come from various 
walks of life; and each naturally seeks for himself a contin- 
uation of those environments which have shaped his previous 
mode of living. This city affords opportunities for the grati- 
fication of all tastes. Churches of all creeds and denomina- 
tions are found here. The Y. M. C. A. is strong and influ- 
ential, and extends a cordial welcome to young men who 
seek the refining influences of this splendid association. The 
Y. W. C. A., working along the same lines, is ever ready and 
anxious to serve the young womari who may wish to have 
thrown about her a Christian influence and a friendship that 
does much to assist and to protect. There are also numerous 
clubs, social and political; lodges and societies of all kinds* 
high-class theaters and places of amusement; and, in fact' 
all things that serve at times to relieve the student's mind 
from the strain of college work. 



'For specific statement of the conditions of the A.M. degree taken under 
this provision, see page 47. 



J 72 University of Southern California 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior 
Year Year Year Year 

Matriculation Fee (paid but 
once, at time of matncula- 
tion) ;---■-$ 50 ° 

Registration Fee (required 
of each student on sign- 
ing the registration roll. 
This does not apply to 
students in their matricu- 
lation year, the matricula- 
tion fee covering this 2QQ $ 2M 

charge) - ■ : -- -~: * 

Tuition Fee (payable in ad- 2QQ QQ 

vance) each year ^uu.uu *uuaa, ^ Q() 

Final Examination Fee 

Rental of Microscope, 
charged each year, for its 
use in the laboratories, to 
Students not furnishing 

their own microscopes 5.UU o.uu 

Breakage Deposit is re- 
quired of all students of 
first and second years, to 
cover breakage and dam- 
age to buildings and 
equipment. Unexpended 
balance will be refunded 
at the close of the year 10.00 __^00 ._- 

$220.00 $217.00 $202.00 $227.00 

County Hospital Ticket 
(Junior and Senior years 
only. Payable at the 
County Hospital). This 
ticket entitles the holder 
to clinical privileges in 
the County Hospital and 
applies to all students in 5 00 5>00 

attendance there 

tVipqp fees are payable in advance each year. If not paid 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 1 73 

Expense of Living in Los Angeles 

t The student can live in Los Angeles as in other large cit- 
ies, moderately or extravagantly, according to his means or 
his habits of life. Good room and board near the College 
may be had for $25.00 per month. 

PRIZES TO BE AWARDED, SESSION 1917-18 

The Faculty will give a prize to that member of the Fresh- 
man Uass > who obtains the highest general average in the 
nnal examinations upon the studies of that year 

The Faculty will give a prize to that member of the Soph- 
omore Class who obtains the highest general average in the 

£l e * aminatlons u Pon the studies of that year 

The Faculty will give a prize to that member of the Junior 
Uass^ who obtained the highest general average in the final 
examinations upon the studies of that year 

The Faculty will give a prize to that member of the Senior 
Uas S> who obtains the highest general average in the final 
examinations upon the studies of that year. 

Surgery Prize 

Professor James^ H. Seymour will give a prize to the 
member of the Senior Class who obtains the highest general 
average throughout the year in the department of Surgery 
Attendance, class and clinic work, general deportment and 
efficiency will count in the awarding of this prize. 

Gynecology and Abdominal Surgery Prize 

Professor Charles W. Bryson will give a prize to the 
member of the Senior Class who obtains the highest general 
av 5 ra A ^ throughout the year in the department of Gynecology 
and Abdominal Surgery. Attendance, class and clinic work 
general deportment and efficiency will count in the award- 
ing of this prize. . 

Hospital Positions 

Internships and appointments in hospitals throughout the 
city and in surrounding towns are available to graduates from 
this college; in fact, in the past we have been unable to fill the 
positions open to appointments. 

HOW TO REACH THE COLLEGE 

M^n k L MapIe aV ^ nUe ' S *l Pedro St " J e ^rson St., or South 
Main M. cars, going south. 

De^°«t a tf. r i V rnii n th K $$' S°' d } re <;tly to the office of the 
uean, at the College building, make known your wishes, and 



1 74 University of Southern California 

present your credentials You will receive the most courteous 

treatment, and full > nfo ™ a * 1 ° 1 ? e « either 8 by the Dean in 
subjects Pertaining to t £ C°Heee *he r £ Department, 
person, or by the Registrar • 01 u selecting 

The Registrar will be in , struc ^ ty t S h S f Fa y c u i ty , as well as 
suitable quarters and each member of Ae* acuity ^ 

many students of the schoo wdl end e avorto^J 
^Tf^ugustTd instruction begins promptly on the 3rd 
of September in all departments. 

Address applications for catalogues and all other commum- 
cations to the Dean. 

DR. CHARLES W. BRYSON 

516 East Washington bt., 

Los Angeles. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

Below will be found tabulated the grouping of subjects as 
embraced in our curriculum. 

Division I. Anatomy, Histology, and Embryology. 

Division II. Chemistry, Toxicology and Dietetics. 
Division III Physiology, and Pharmacology. 
Division IV. Pathology, Bacteriology, Clinical Microscopy 

and Hygiene. 
Division V. Medicine and Medical Specialties. 
Division VI. Surgery and Surgical Specialties. 
Division VII. Obstetrics, Gynecology and Abdominal Sur- 
gery. 

DIVISION I. ANATOMY, HISTOLOGY AND 
EMBRYOLOGY 

HAR F^i Y bry 3 o?o C g i y R WHITE ' M ' D " Pr o fes *or of Anatomy, Histology and 

MU £^&U Y ^^. M ^ Assi5tant ***«" ° f A^omy and 
FRANK R. WEBB, M.D., Instructor in and Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Description of Course and Method of Instruction 
in Human Anatomy 

This department aims to present the subject of Human 
Anatomy in a thoroughly scientific and practical manner.. The 
laboratory work is done under constant surveillance. The 
student is required to take frequent individual quizzes upon 
the cadaver; to demonstrate all parts dissected to a compe- 
tent demonstrator; and to attend class quizzes and an indi- 
vidual oral and written final examination. The lectures sup- 
plement the laboratory work dealing with such facts from, 
embryology and comparative vertebrate anatomy as will Rive 
breadth to the student's view of the field. In connection with 
the laboratory work, lectures are delivered, reviewing the 
work that has been completed. The object of this is to call 
attention to the relations and significance of the parts that 
have been studied and to elucidate, with the aid of specially 
prepared anatomical charts, diagrams, and imported models 
the anatomy of difficult and important structures. Especial 
pains are taken to emphasize the broader morphological sig- 
nificance of the details of Human Anatomy. With a view to 
introducing students properly to the study of Practical 
Anatomy they are taught by section demonstrations how 
to dissect and what to seek for in the part to be dissected 




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1 78 University of Southern California 

Besides the demonstrators who are detailed to guto the 
student through the various steps of dissection, a specially 
prepared anatomical outline on every. region of the .human 
bodv is furnished to the student for his guidance.. The aim 

tations, demonstrations on the- cadaver dry Md«Unao 

wmmmmm 

of the central nervous system and the organs of the special 

Se The S ' dissecting material is abundant thoroughly preserved 
bv the latest scientific processes of embalming, scrupulously 
cfeat and absolutely free from offensive odors or mfective 

oroseftors are appointed who do special dissection work and 
Quizzing unde e r the direction of the Professor and assistants. 

(A) GROSS ANATOMY 

Course 1. Freshman Anatomy. The course in Freshman 
Anatomy includes the study of Osteology, Arthology, Myol- 
osv Angiology (including the heart), Respiratory and Di- 
gfs y tive Systems, Neurology of the extremities, and dissec- 
tion of the upper and lower extremities. 

Lectures and Recitations 216 h °}J rs 

Laboratory Exercises * 

Professor White and Assistants 3° 6 hours 

Course 2. Sophomore Anatomy. The course in 1 Sopho- 
moVe Anatomy includes the study and dissection of the Head 
Neck ThoS and Abdominal organs the Perineum Duct- 
less Glands, Genito-Urinary Organs, Respiratory . GrcuU- 

Tbi? course is a continuation of the first year, but from the 
Sndpornt ofthe application, and not as an abstract science. 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 1 79 

It embraces the outlines, positions, and relations of the 
various organs and the means of recognizing them, thus giv- 
ing a knowledge necessary for diagnostic and operative pur- 
poses. The bones are studied individually and collectively 
the student pointing out and describing the different parts 
from actual specimens. Bones are loaned to the students for 
private study. 

Lectures, Demonstrations and Recitations. .. 90 hour? 

Laboratory Exercises 1 80 hours 

Profesor White and Assistants ...270 hours 

Course 3. Surgical Applied Anatomy and Operative Sur- 
gery on the cadaver is taught in the third year. (Dr. Varian 
36 hours.). 

(B) HISTOLOGY 

Course 1. Elementary Histology is given during the 
freshman year. The study of fresh tissue, disassociation 
methods, and the technique in the preparation of fixed and 
hardened tissues is given the student. All the elementary 
tissue of the body, including normal blood, etc., are studied. 
(Prof. White and Assistants, 162 hours.) 

Course 2. Histology of the Central Nervous System is 
taught during the Sophomore year. (Prof. White and As- 
sistants, 108 hours.) 

(C) EMBRYOLOGY 

Embryology is taught by didactic instruction and labora- 
tory work during the Freshman year. Lectures and quizzes 
on the structure of germ cells, the decidua, and the placenta 
are given at the beginning of the course. Following this, 
the student is required to prepare and mount embryo chicks,' 
illustrating development up to and including the differen- 
tiation of the somites. 

Lectures and recitations in human embryology are a part 
of this course. The students are required to make drawings 
and diagrams of the folding in of the layers of the embryo, 
including the histology of the foetal membranes. The com- 
plete histogenesis of the principal organs of the body is 
studied. The students are required to prepare their own sec- 
tions, from which demonstrations and drawings are made. 

The equipment in this department is complete and con- 
sists of incubators, charts, models, t and all the usual necessary 
histological and embryological material. (Prof. White and 
Assistants, 108 hours.) 



180 University of Southern California 

DIVISION II. CHEMISTRY, TOXICOLOGY AND 
DIETETICS 

HORACE L WHITE, Ph.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
wTlLIAm'rOY CLEVELAND, M.S., Instructor in Chem.stry 

(A) CHEMISTRY 

Although this school requjre. , two years of collegiate work 

for admission, which must ^"^^J^^^ds^ advisable 
in chem.stry, the Department of Chemistry t»nas 

processes is pointed out. 

Course 1 Review of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry. 
FifsT 1 ^'students. Given during *efir.t semester This 
course comprises a -v iew of the pro P erUe . o^ 
^Tcon JU&W th^as laws <and ^ap^catton to 
^^^^o^££^^ elements and 
their practical application. 

r™,™.. 2 Review of Organic Chemistry. First year stu- 

demonstration. 

quantitative estimations. ^ 

rmir<je 5 Toxicology. First year students. Given during 
the^ second semester. g The course in toxicology is planned 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 181 

so as to give the student an understanding of the action of 
poisonous substances, the general methods of treatment in 
cases of poisoning and the methods of separation and iden- 
tification. Instruction is given by lectures, recitations, dem- 
onstrations and extended laboratory work. 

Course 6. Biochemical Methods. Elective. This course 
is arranged for students who desire to study more inten- 
sively by the laboratory method some phase of biological 
chemistry. Subject, time and method of instruction will be 
arranged in each individual case. 

Course 7. Research in Bio-Chemistry. Elective. This 
course is offered to provide opportunity for qualified stu- 
dents to pursue bio-chemical research under the supervision 
°* the department. Collaboration with clinical work is pos- 
sible if desired. Hours to be arranged. 

Course 8. Bio-Chemical Seminar. The object of the Semi- 
nar is to enable the student not only to keep pace with the 
progress of this branch of medical science, but also to 
familiarize himself with methods of scientific thinking and 
procedure. Hours to be arranged. 

Total number of hours in the entire course : 

* reshman Chemistry— Didactic 180 hours 

Freshman Chemistry—Laboratory ["'.'.216 hours 

396 hours 

(B) DIETETICS 

Course 1. Third year students. One hour a week during 
the first semester. This course includes an outline of the 
factors of nutrition, their practical significance, and a discus* 
sum of the modern theories of diet with which the practi- * 
tioner should be familiar, together with the scientific data on 
which each is based. (Prof. White; 18 hours.) 

DIVISION III. PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

ARTHUR D. BUSH, B.S., M.D.. Professor of Physiology and Pharma- 
cology 
E. J. VAN LIERE, M.S., Instructor in Physiology 

(A) PHYSIOLOGY. Freshman and Sophomore Years. 

Instruction in this department will be such as to furnish 
thorough information concerning the living body in its nor- 
mal condition. While frequent references will he made to 
illuminating facts in comparative physiology, yet the prin- 
cipal study both in the class room and in the laboratory will 
be human physiology. Emphasis will be placed on that in- 



] 82 University of Southern California 

formation which will be of greatest M^g£ *» stujentjn 
o^arerbTd^erSrhow^the human body the genera! 
laws of Phpiology are ■manifested ^ ^^ , 

anrwrUtt^titationtdronstrations, laboratory stud.es, 
conferences and seminar. 

Course 1. Physiology. tt^Jgis ^^estion", 
tions and conferences. This course dea^swn B ^ 

(Prof. Bush; 36 hours.) 
Course 2. Laboratory Physiology ^^Kfin care! 

E^e^ 

of deduction. For this preliminary . rammg a ew o 
classic experiments in general P^of w working 

The second aim is to give the .student an i purpose 

acquaintance with the funcUonmg .^- ^J^^g/has 
an extended series of experiment! mappu ea P > r of 

been arranged in close correlation with the sudj £hen _ 

S^£l^SSS!^S^& wading Phenomena 

of human physiology. . required to hand in writ- 

Students ; working x ; n er ^f nt ^ n b c e / p e q r ating graphic records 
ten reports of all ex P e V™ emb ' Th investigation method will 

analysis. (Prof. Bash; 72 hours.) 

Co«sa 3. JW»lo f • *£**£ £g-j£ nSjS* 

Course 5. Research in Physiok>gy A course devoted * 
the training in method, and to JJ^^Se^s only who 

&^£8ffid^^* physiology - 

Total number of hours: 126 

Lectures and Recitations Z"Z- 144 

Laboratory 

270 

Total 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 183 

(B) PHARMACOLOGY. Sophomore Year. 

cV}-^?*™* '?. Pharmacology is planned to cover the fields 

Pharmacodynamics, 
laboratory, supple- 



of Materia Medica, Pharmacopedics, and Pharmacodynamics 
Ihe major portion of the work will be laboratory, sur 



mented by lectures and recitations. 

Course 1. The Principles of Pharmacology. 36 hours, 
hirst Semester Lectures dealing with the Theories of 
Pharmacologic Action, Methods of Administration, and those 
substances characterized chiefly by their local action. 

Course 2. Materia Medica Laboratory. 36 hours, first half 
First Semester A study of the physical and chemical prop- 
erties^ and leading incompatibilities, of the more important 
medicines The laboratory will be well stocked with both 
crude and prepared drugs so the student may become ac- 
quainted with their appearance and properties. 

Course 3 Pharmacopedics Laboratory. 36 hours, second 
half First Semester. A study of the methods of compound- 
ing, and the leading characteristics of the principal prepara- 
tions of the Pharmacopoeia. 

Course 4. 12 hours, second half First Semester. A brief 
course reviewing by recitations the information acquired in 
Course 2, and applying this information in the writing and 
filling of prescriptions. s 

Course 5. Physiological Action of Drugs. 54 hours, Sec- 
ond Semester. This course consists of a thorough discus- 
sion of the way and manner in which the living organism 
responds to the more important drugs. Lectures, recitations 
and conferences. 

Course 6. Pharmacodynamics Laboratory. 96 hours Sec- 
ond Semester. A series of carefully selected studies of the 
effects of the more important drugs on the several systems 
1 hese experiments are first conducted on frogs to learn prob- 
able reactions; then on mammals like the cat and rabbit for 
confirmation and the exercise of greater care and finer tech- 
nique; then on a fellow student, to secure the reactions of 
a normal human being; then by careful observations of 
those hospital patients to whom the attending physicians 
have prescribed drugs, to note how drug action maybe modi- 
fied by disease toxins. Students will work in assigned 
groups, arid will keep careful records, both graphic and writ- 
ten, of all experimentation, credits being awarded for care- 
in deduction ^ Servatl ° n ' P recision » tabulation and accuracy 

Course 7. Research in Pharmacodynamics. A course the 
object of which is to carefully train students in the methods 



184 University of Southern California 

of research, and to assist ^^^^^SSSSSSS 
SffSftS? SnlsScfarSitu^ and ability in Phar- 
macology. 

Total number of hours: 90 

Professor Bush (Lectures) 180 

Professor Bush (Laboratory) 

270 

Total 

DIVISION IV. PATHOLOGY, BACTERIOLOGY AND 
DIVISION CLINICAL MIC ROSCOPY 

a T r-ROVER PhB M.S., M.D., Professor of Pathology, Bacteriology 
A. L. GROVER, Fn.B., d ' CUnical Microscopy . 

. KO v W. HAMMACK.*^.. «£*— «"*" "* »«""' 

ALICE MARTIN, Laboratory Technician 

(A) BACTERIOLOGY. 

KSS-d -^-rand .ac^n^wrth the action the 

various media together J 1 * ™ e ^ ^ "bacteria are taught, 
immunity and * h e diseases produced by d technique, 

In the laboratory the student is taught a sterilization 

the preparation of culture media the pnnup and ^^.^ 
Shttr^d^i metfods of examming 

milk, water, etc. Coffin 144 hours didactic and 

(Professor Grover and Dr. wmn, m ,« 
laboratory during the Sophomore year.) 

(B) PATHOLOGY. 

1 rvnoral Pathology. This subject is taught by 
Course 1. General ratnoioBy. pv . rc : ses so as to con- 
lectures, recitations and laboratory exercises s^ .^^ 

sider the causes .of disease both ante and p ^^ 

rrShy" ^e^C^SSr k? tumor formation. 

Course 2. This is a ^^^fS^i^ *?gS 
the general principles thef c acquirea r 1 a nd 2 the subject 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 185 

of both gross and microscopical specimens of the lesions. 
Recitations cover both the didactic and laboratory work. 
(Professor Grover and Dr. Coffin, 234 hours during the Soph- 
omore year.) 

Course 3. > Surgical Pathology. This course consists of lec- 
tures covering the application of pathology to localities of 
importance in surgery. These lectures will be amplified with 
gross and microscopical specimens and recitations. (Pro- 
fessor Grover, 36 hours during the Junior year.) 

(C) CLINICAL MICROSCOPY. This course consists of 
lectures, recitations and laboratory work. In the lectures 
the student is given the standard clinical laboratory methods 
for* the examination, both chemical and microscopical, for 
urine, blood, gastric contents, faeces, sputum, pus, various 
body fluids, etc. The technique of the Wassermann test is 
also given. In the laboratory, working with material from 
the hospital and dispensaries, the student applies these tests 
Recitations attempt to correlate the whole. (Dr. Coffin, 72 
hours during Junior year.) 

(D) AUTOPSIES. Practical instruction is given in the 
methods of making post-mortem examinations and of mak- 
ing records of the same. When practical, autopsies are per- 
formed by the students under direction. In every case the 
student studies and describes both the gross and the his- 
tological changes of the diseased tissues. All essential ex- 
aminations are made. Given at County Hospital to sections 
of Junior class. (Professor Grover, Dr. Coffin and Dr Ham- 
mack, 48 hours each section.) 

(E) ADVANCED WORK AND RESEARCH. Open to 
properly qualified students or graduates. (Prof. Grover.) 

(F) HYGIENE. In this course the lectures take up the 
problems of sanitation and hygiene as well as preventive 
medicine. Each student is required to make a sanitary sur- 
vey of a certain locality and in this way becomes familiar 
with the practical application of all sanitary rules and regu- 
lations. In the laboratory the student is required to make 
chemical and bacteriological examinations of water, milk and 
other foods. (Professor Grover and Dr. Coffin, Sophomore 
years, 36 hours; Junior year, 36 hours; Senior year, 36 hours 
Total, 108 hours.) 

(G) SEMINAR. This is held weekly by the staff and ad- 
vanced students for the purpose of reviewing and discussing 
current medical literature pertaining to their subjects. All 
departmental problems are also freely discussed. (Professor 
Grover, 1 hour a week throughout the year.) 



1 86 University of Southern California 

DIVISION V. MEDICINE AND MEDICAL 
SPECIALTIES 

FREDERICK A. ■fe^*j&?&E£ JttEfe* ! , 

™ M L P ESa MANSpkG M.D.", Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology 

and Neuropathology. Professor of Diseases of the Chest. 

♦ CHARLES C. BROWNING MD. Professor o Dise ases of the 

F. M. POTTENGER, A.M., M.D., LL.D., froiessor 

at MRT SOILAND, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 
BDWA'S'toUGLASS JONES, M.D., A....1... **»« °> W— 

WM° £ B M KERN M D., Assistant Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry. 

a' tt r,ODIN M.D., Lecturer on Medicine. 

ROBERT ^ DUNSMOOR, Instructor in Electrotherapy. 
DWIGHT 8 MOORE, M.D., Instructor in Medicine 

K D^loVEJoY'^Dri^tructor in Dermatology. 
AMEEN U. FARED, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
H H WILSON, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
W .E. BAKER, M.D., Instructor in Pedriatrics. 

(a) MEDICINE. 

^oTleave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 187 

lectures and demonstrations in Normal Physical Diagnosis. 
This work includes the regional topographical anatomy of the 
body, the rules governing inspection, palpation, percussion, 
auscultation, mensuration, including a short course on the 
signs and symptoms of general diagnosis. Tn this course 
specific symptomatology is avoided. (Dr. Kane, 36 hours.) 

Course 2. Didactic Physical Diagnosis. In the Junior 
year, one hour each week is given in didactic instruction on 
charts, models, by drawings, diagrams and on living sub- 
jects. (Associate Prof. Herbert, 36 hours.) 

Course 3. Clinical Physical Diagnosis. In the Junior year, 
practical instruction is given Mondays at the County Hos- 
pital. (Associate Professor Herbert, Drs. Leavitt, Shulman, 
Perkey, Godin, Gallagher and Kane, 72 hours each section.) 

Course 4. Sophomore Medicine. 36 hours didactic work 
during second semester is given to fundamental medicine. 
(Dr. Kane.) 

Course 5. Junior Didactic Medicine. During the Junior 
year, three hours each week are devoted to didactic and reci- 
tative instruction. The work "is of a thoroughly practical 
nature and embraces a study of Internal Diseases generally, 
Parasitic Diseases, Infectious Diseases, Constitutional Dis- 
eases and the Diseases of the Lungs, Heart and Blood-ves- 
sels, Liver, Stomach and Intestines, Pancreas, Kidneys 
Spleen and Lymphatic System, Blood and Ductless Glands 
(Associate Professor Wessels, Drs. Leavitt and Shulman, 
144 hours.) 

Course 6. Junior Clinical Medicine. Clinics and confer- 
ence courses at the bedside in the Los Angeles County Hos- 
pital are given on Thursdays, 10 to 11 a. m., and Fridays, 
10 a. im to 12 m. (exclusive of the work given in Physical 
Diagnosis.^ (Prof. Wright, Prof. Browning, Drs. Leavitt, 
Godin, Maisch, Granger, Huntoon, Rothwell, Wilson and 
Assistants. Total, 120 hours each section.) 

Course 7. Senior Didactic General Medicine. The Senior 
students receive didactic and recitative instruction in General 
Medicine covering the subjects given in clinic and confer- 
ence at the' Los Angeles County Hospital. See Course II. 
(Prof. Speik, Assoc. Prof. Wessels, and Dr. Barrow. Total 
72 hours.) • 

Course 8. Senior Tropical Medicine is taught in the Senior 
year one hour each week for twenty-four weeks Clinic 
cases are seen at the Los Angeles County Hospital when- 
ever possible. First and second twelve weeks. (Dr. Johnson 
24 hours.) J ' 



188 University of Southern California 

weeks. (Dr. Johnson, 12 hours.) 

hours each section.) 

Course 11. Senior Clinical Medicine. 

A. Diseases of the Alimentary Tract and J^ver C ^c 
and Conference course at the ^» Angeles Co unty * p ^ 
First twelve weeks. (Prot. bpeiK, ivioi lu * ' p f w s . 
m ., 24 hours.) Second twelve = weeks. (Assoc. Wot. 
sels, Wednesday, 10 a. m. to 12 m., 24 hours.) ^ 

B Infectious Diseases, with special attention given to Ap- 

24 hours.) * , __. , • 

C. Diseases of the Heart, Blood Ve»eto «j ^ ^dneys 
Clinic and Conference course at the Lo* Angele County 

a^rS^^^Vh^r^w^wX: (Prof. Speik, 
Mondays, 10 a. m. to 12 m., 24 hours.) 

n Diseases of Blood and Ductless Glands, with special 
re£ren?rto Se Ap plied Therapeutics Clinic and coherence 

SSE &K P^Wes^WeKSs, 10 a. n, to 12 
m., 24 hours.) 
E. Dfce.sos of Metabolism »"l C 7j' tu ?„°° a fe. 'Snts 

Second twelve weeks. 

hours, Course 11, 216 hours.) 

Course 12. Senior Clinical Medical I ^^^ Oinjc 
and conference course at ^? L °s Angeles CoumyP^ 

Je h nts CO (Prof S ^Mi^^^^^ each sec- 
tion.) : 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 189 

(B) THERAPEUTICS 

Course 1. Junior year students devote one hour each week 
to this branch of the work. The method employed in teach- 
ing this department is didactic and clinical, with recitative 
review of the most important subjects, from time to time 
supplemented by clinical instruction at regular periods 
throughout the year. A portion of the time is devoted to the 
practical side of toxicology and to the study and application 
of prescription writing. (Dr. Watson, 36 hours.) 

Course 2. The Senior students devote one hour each week 
throughout the entire college year to this branch of the 
work. It is intended to divide the class into sections of from 
four to ten members in each section and assign to each sec- 
tion from time to time certain patients afflicted with the dis- 
order desired to be studied, and they are required to write 
a complete history of the cases presented, outline a method 
of management according to their own previous knowledge 
and then during a class conference they are corrected' 
quizzed and instructed in the various recognized methods of 
treatment and management of the diseases under considera- 
tion. (Associate Prof. Jones; 36 hours.) 

(B) PEDIATRICS 

Course 1. Junior Class. The Principles of Pediatrics. A 

conference and didactic course comprising the anatomy 
physiology and hygiene of infancy and childhood, and the 
dietetics of infancy as a foundation for the work in the 
Senior Class. (Drs. Brandel and Bowers, 60 hours.) 

Course 2. Senior Class Didactic and Recitative Instruction 
one hour each week. (Dr. Scott, 36 hours.) 

Course 3. A bedside clinic and conference course at the 
Los Angeles County Hospital. Topics, first trimester, The 

£vl in S i9° J n i! anCy \ ^ fan - Feedin ^ ( Dr - Scott, Thurs- 
days, 10-12, 24 hours.) Topics, second trimester, The Com- 
moner Diseases of Infancy, including Rickets, Scurvy, Con- 
genital Syphilis, Tuberculosis and Infectious Diseases (Dr 
Scott, Thursdays, 10-12, 24 hours.) 

(D) NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASES 

Tnn£!f Se ^ The . cours r e j n Neurology and Psychiatry in the 
Jumor year consists of lectures and clinics at the College 
^l n tl7?T£ Coun Jy Hospital. (Dr. Kern, 36 hours di- 
t 1 60 h 4 x hours chmcal instruction each section.) (To- 



190 University of Southern California 

36 hours.) 

Course 3. Senior Class. Neurology. Didactic and Reci- 
tative conference. (Prof. Manger, 36 hours.) 

Course 4. Senior Class. Psychiatry. Didactic and reci- 
tative conference. (Dr. Kern, 36 hours.) 

fast twelve weeks, 12 hours each section.) 
(E) DERMATOLOGY 

s trass ss&smk $*# si *" 

hours.) (Total, 48 hours.) 

(F) ROENTGENOLOGY AND ELECTROTHERAPY 

rAlircp i Electricity. One lecture a week will be given 

the electrical currents used in medicine. 

will have access to ■ .compte X-ray laboratory 
paratus for the W UA«o ^ j n plate e quip- 
S^U^ ^aulbi^fo^'dUonstration throughout the 
year.' (Prof. Soiland, 36 hours.) 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 191 

(G) MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

Lectures will be given on the following subjects: Legal 
relations of physician to patient, and patient to physician, 
including rights of compensation, collection of fees, mal- 
practice; legal relation of physician to government, includ- 
ing government regulation of practice, power to protect pub- 
lic health, nuisances and their abatement, adulteration of 
foods; elementary general principles of law, knowledge of 
which ^ frequently is required by and useful to physicians, 
including wills, estates of insane and deceased persons, 
crimes of violence, rights of children, negligence; legal as- 
pects of mental disorders and diseases, including testamen- 
tary capacity, criminal responsibility of insane, alcoholism 
and drug addictions, legal incompetency to contract, care 
for and custody of insane; property rights of insane; per- 
sona^ injuries by violence (a) in civil damage cases, and (b) 
in criminal cases, including rules of evidence, . medico-legal 
inspection, autopsies (a) to ascertain cause of death, and 
(b) to obtain evidence of manner of infliction, suicide; tox- 
icology, sex perversions, pregnancy, disease and divorce; life ' 
and accident insurance; expert and opinion evidence, includ- 
ing the medical witness, his position, rights and duties. 

Efforts will be made in thus department to familiarize stu- 
dents with the proper methods of practice and procedure in 
all matters wherein the practitioner of medicine is likely to 
come in contact with the law or the government, and espe- 
cially in that large class of cases where accurate knowledge 
of legal requirements is called for upon the instant. The lack 
of such knowledge frequently has enacted great embarrass- 
ment, both to the courts and to the medical profession. 
(George L. Greer, Attorney-at-Law, 36 hours.) 

(H) HISTORY OF MEDICINE AND MEDICAL 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 

j Dr P. C. Remondino of San Diego, Cal., will deliver, dur- 
ing the session of 1918-19, a series of lectures to the entire 
student body upon that most interesting and instructive topic, 
History of Medicine and Medical Bibliography. This sub- 
ject has been added to and made a part of the curriculum of 
this College. Dr. Remondino has been selected to present 
this course, he being a man of finished scholarly attainments 
and his inherent ability, together with his broad and compre- 
hensive knowledge of this subject, the results of a lifelong 
t?u a u- resear r ch into th e seemingly impenetrable mysteries 
ot the history of medicine, is an evidence of his peculiar fit- 
ness to make this course interesting and instructive. During 
the coming year Dr. Remondino will begin his course with a 
lecture on the medicine of the ancient Arcadians, during 
which he will trace the similarity of their Shaminic medicine, 



192 University of Southern California 

the ancient race relationship existing between the Laplander 
of Northern Europe and the ancient Tauranian races that 
once inhabited the plains and mountains of Babylonia. Fol- 
lowing this the medicine of the Aboriginal American Oceanic 
and African Tribes will form the subject of the next lectures 
durin- which the enlightened state of the medicine of the 
Ma avaiT Indians of Yucatan will be traced in its origin to 
far y Egyptian sources. The next lectures, will be devoted 
t^ the elucidation of the states of Egyptian, Hindoo and 
Greek medicine prior to its pre-Hippocratic era. Then will 
follow The Hippocratic and Alexandrian, the Roman and he 
Arabian with the period of Renaissance in Europe in the 
Sixteenth Century. In fact, a review of Medicine from the 
Sliest possible obtainable history down to and including 

^Th'elbovetutline^The course will suffice to call the at- 
tention of the student along these lines to the opportunities 
offered here in this too oft neglected department. We be- 
Heve that the broad-minded, up-to-date medical man should 
know at least something of the history of his profession. 
(Dr. Remondino, 6 hours.) 

(I) LIFE INSURANCE EXAMINATION 

A series of lectures, will be given to the Junior class on 
Life Insurance Examination, the subjects being. (1) ine 
Life Insurance Institution, (2) The Family History, (3) The 
Personal History, (4) The Physical Examination, (5). The 
Laboratory Sination, (6) The Prognosis. (Dr. Finley, 
6 hours.) 

(J) MEDICAL ETHICS AND ECONOMICS 

This college in keeping pace with the advancements being 
ma T d h e 1S inmed g i e c'al teachL/and training has adopted Aer^n- 
mendation of the Educational Council of the American ivieu 
kal Association and added to its curriculum a department of 
Medicaf Ethics and Economics. The young man or woman 
Sing a degree from a medical institution must go forth, 
Sualfy illy prepared, to take and to occupy the highposi- 
Hon and Place in the professional and business world .that 
should be expected of them. This course will consist of 
tweWe lectured .the Senior class during the -econd a«ne.ter 
upon the fundamental business principles so esse n^l Jo the 
success of the young practitioner, the duties of the medical 
man to himself to his confreres, to his patients and to he 
publi at Targe the relation that should exist .between th e 
medical man and the druggist, the Church and 1 ^fud of the 
etc This course will aim to inculcate into the mind ot the 
sudent that broad spirit of altruism which should regulate 
and control the relations existing between mankind. This 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 193 

course will embrace and set forth that true spirit of fraterni- 
zation that should permeate the ranks of the medical pro- 
fession, that spirit of brotherly love, which seems to have 
been forgotten by the medical fraternity in its onward and 
rapid progress. The basic principles of organization and 
unity will be outlined, and, in fact, medical sociology will be 
woven into a strong and durable fabric which we believe will 
redound greatly to the future benefit of those who go out into 
V£ Y°|; ld ' t0 accomplish better things by better methods. 
(Prof. Bryson and Seymour, 12 hours.) 

DIVISION VII. SURGERY AND SURGICAL 
SPECIALTIES 

JAM S E u?g££ RVEY SEYMOUR . M- D -> Professor of Surgery and Clinical 
ORV S I ige E y°- WITHERBEE . M.D., Professor of Surgery and Clinical 
CH ^ F iin7Jl L t^y BRYS ° N ' A - B - M -°- ***■"* * Abdominal 
WIL ana A Rhino!o A gy DER ZUILL ' ^^ Pr ° feSSOr ° f ° toI °^ L-ynology 
7n«M A -5J5 FFERSON McC <>Y, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology 
JOH «^SgSK KYLE ' B - S - MD " Pr ° feSSOr ° f ° tol °^ Wngoiogy 
F w C w L E J B ATTISOB ' MD - Professor of Clinical Surgery 
^a^,t RI t C ,P ARDSON ' MD - Professor of Clinical Surgery 
GEORG^mSS^fu^^rl^a Pr ° feSS ° r ° f Genito-Urin^ry Surgery. 
GEO gol G o E y J a^ S |hinolo N g?: M " D " ASS ° Cme Pr ° feSSOr ° £ 0tol <>^ L «yn- 
° E0 ^2S£Sr GT0N ' MCCOY ' A - M - M - D ' *"**• Professor of 
P- C tu«s ancpD'isbc^tions 350 " 3 * 6 Pr ° feSS ° r ° f <>«»"*«*« Surgery, Frac- 
WA Surg R ry LESLIE H UGGINS, W».B., M.D., Associate Professor of 

HARLAN 8 S HOFMA^ IL a L i PS ' M AB - MD > Assistant *"*««* of 

W H KIG1?P Mn a' AB *x> M ?- Associate Professor of Surgery. 

*x" VT K , IGER ' MD - Assistant Professor of Proctology. 

r I?' r^fll- tu B - M - D -' Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

S - t, H A CRILEY, Ph.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical Surrerv 

FRE on LgST 1 ^' M - D - : * A - T - CARLTON, A.B., M?D., Lef turers 

L. LORE RIGGIN, Ph.B., M.D.; *CHAS. S. YOUNG M D F K 

WIRT ByA N D\EY D r, G Wr V M ILE 7r, BR ° 0ME ' MD - ^-f^J^ 
RRAN7AB m^ KI t N ' MD - : HERBERT AUGUSTUS ROSEN- 
C V • Hpi inn -'Ji ; D \^" tur ! rs ° n Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

C - F wa N r E D L S SO b'.s MD m: d T walt°e R r R T N ba A y?ey MD m : d H - b W yr1, D n 

s P r°u^rs S 7n S °u K g E erV. AB " "^ * CHAS " W^Kci!& lf£ R ?Z 
f-Prw™ S A ?Jl IS - M - D - instructor in Ophthalmology. 

l°d N T?roa JESBERG ' M -°-' InStrUCt0r in leases rf Eye, Ear, Nose 
ROBERT VERNE DAY, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



1 94 University of Southern California 

(a) SURGERY 

The course of teaching in this department embraces both 
didactic and clinical methods and consists of the following: 

Course 1. Minor Surgery. .One hour each week during the 
Sophomore year will be devoted to Minor Surgery. Minor 
Surgery, in its broadest sense, as taught in the Sophomore 
year, will lay the foundation for the Junior and Senior Surg- 
ical courses. (Dr. C. S. Young or Dr. W. A. Bayley, 36 
hours.) 

Course 2. Anaesthesia and Bandaging. One hour each 
week during the second semester, will be given to Anaes- 
thesia and Bandaging. Anaesthesia, that most reliable and 
dependable adjunct to the field of operative, surgical sci- 
ence, will be treated minutely, broadly and comprehensive- 
ly to round out the Sophomore's ideas and knowledge of 
these subjects as a foundation. (Dr. C. S. Young or Dr. W. 
A. Bayley, 18 hours.) 

Course 3. Junior Surgery. In the Junior year a thorough 
and systematic course is given in the fundamental and basic 
principles of Surgery. This course is conducted along the 
lines which have proved the most satisfactory and thorough 
in the up-to-date and foremost medical institutions through* 
out the country, and consists in lectures, recitations, quizzes, 
ward walks, close bedside demonstrations and instructions, 
history writing, case taking, and the actual participation in 
the treatment and management of all varieties of surgical 
conditions. This Junior work would not be complete with- 
out the postmortem study of various cases that have been 
under observation in ward and clinic. The Junior Class is 
divided into sections. Clinical material is abundant in all 
departments, and each student in each section in each de- 
partment receives ample personal and the best collective 
instruction. (Dr. Huggins, Avery, Shoemaker and Broome, 
Didactic, 108 hours. Drs. Huggins, Shoemaker, Criley, Avery, 
Riggin, Young, Broome, Nelson, Morrison, Bayley and Ed- 
wards, Clinical, 96 hours. Total, 204 hours.) 

Course 4. Fractures and Dislocations is taught during the 
Junior year. In this course the didactic and mechanical in- 
struction is supplemented by bedside observation at both 
the college clinic and in the wards of the County Hospital. 
Here are taught and shown the latest methods in treatment 
of fractures and dislocations, the adjustment of splints, the 
application of plaster casts, jackets, and other appliances. 
(Dr. Lettice, 36 hours.) 

Course 5. Proctology. Clinical material is abundant, and 
clinics are conducted at the County Hospital regularly, and 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 195 

will include digital, proctoscopic examinations and operative 
work with sufficient didactic and recitative hours to round 
out the course in this too often neglected surgical specialty. 
(Dr. Kiger, 18 didactic hours, Junior year; 24 clinical hours, 
Senior year.) 

Course 6. The course in Senior Surgery is designed to be 
essentially an operative one, covering the entire range of Gen- 
eral Surgery and will be conducted four mornings each week, 
trom 8 to 10 am., in the General Operative Amphitheater 
at the County Hospital. This clinic is for Senior students 
and will embrace within its scope not only the surgical tech- 
nique along with the surgical procedures, but will include 
the pre- and post-operative management of each case pre- 
sented. It is presumed that the student has been trained in 
his Sophomore and Junior years in the fundamentals; that 

a ;° Und . atlon . has been laid broad and firm in his course, 
and that his mind is receptive to the pre-conditions, the oper- 
ative technique and the post-operative procedures and condi- 
tions together with the things to be avoided and the dan- 
gers to be looked for and dreaded along the lines of this 
r a •• /? he Senior students are also working in college clinic 
and in Out-Patient department, and when the student finishes 
his work here in this school he has had proper training and 
his foundation is broad and ample. This clinic course is 
interspersed with didactic, recitative and quiz periods, which 
?TW«° f ° ^t the course in the most adequate manner. 
( u Seymour, Didactics, 72 hours. Profs. Seymour, With- 
20i e hoiJ?s at ) t,SOn Richar dson, Clinical, 129 hours. Total, 

(B) ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

Orthopedic Surgery is given through the Junior year, and 
bns.sts of didactic work, with extensive clinical demonstra- 
tion two hours each week at the County Hospital. This 
Ztnuirt 6 ""traction in the application and adjust- 
Sm,„? S ?t a pP a ™tus; the theory and practice of the 
anr I W tt° t ' lbe . rc, ? la ';.»>one diseases by mechanical means, 
and by the hygienic-dietetic treatment; the treatment of 
scoliosis by Abbot's correction, jackets and felt pads gym- 
fla?& C r tnClty ' 3nd ma /?age; treatment of talipes^nd 
„ „ t ? ; i he management of infantile paralysis; and practical 
$ Pah rfilT Z°u aS W ^ a | ° perat ' ve hospital work 

(C) GENITO-URINARY DISEASES 

Bj«^ 8 ^ 1- This course comprises a series of lectures and 
clinical demonstrations and extends throughout the Sen* or 



196 University of Southern California 

yea, I„ .he leemre. and -,»««. the st»de"« •£&&£$ 

divided into sections. 

Course 2. At the College Clinic the student j > obliged^ 

Ss^ elch^eSn unT/ guidance *F& instructor. 

Course 3. At the County Hog^ ^'jffi 
urological operations are perfomied and ^o ^ ^ 

tion given in urethroscopy, T t several patients are cysto- 
In the cystoscopic department several pa 
scoped simultaneously, the important parts n r .. h 

dicited and clinical examinations .made, J * of 
student to obtain a systematic cm lQ ^ag ms ^ 

mind. Lantern slides of ^"^A™^ System, where- 
pathological conditions are shown. The case sy , ^ 
by the students assist in the diagnosis are p 

operation and have the 1 °PP ortunl . t 7 f °} 1 ! 1 °e ( ng a S f| r as possi- 

m P icroscopic pathology, ^f on is followed as far P^ 

ble. In the hospital wards * e EfP*™^* a u man _ 
ment of the acute surgical condition vveu 

agement of chronic diseases a" demonstrated. p y ^ 

axis and treatment ^'"^Le^g^of the bladder, 
Local anesthesia as applied to the : surg ery ^ College 

scrotum and penis is thorough 1yd emonst ated ^t ^ 

Clinic and the County Hosp tal. ^ ro 24 clinic hours 
Dakin and Rosenkranz 36 didactic nours», 
each section. Total, 60 hours.) 

(D) OTOLOGY, LARYNGOLOGY AND RHINOLOGY 

The work in this department is so arranged as to givejhe 

^^^aSSSS^^^SSi to the County 

Hospital Work. ^ pnnr tment consists of one lec- 

The didactic work of the* V*«™™'°™ - ons and 

Sed by both oral and written: SJ , "L W ' ,„, stndy of the 
A S^S1e,r rf.Ka^oae a^toa, J- d-r 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 197 

accessory sinuses. Second, lectures on the influence of gen- 
eral diseases upon these special organs, and also the influence 
which diseases of these organs exert upon the general condi- 
tion and health of the patient. Third, methods of examina- 
tion ot ear nose and throat and special consideration of the 
diseases affecting them. Fourth, a careful study of the dis- 
eases of the accessory sinuses. Fifth, operations. (Profs. 
Znin and Kyle and Assoc. Prof. Lund, 36 didactic hours, 48 
clinical hours, each section. Total, 84 hours.) 

(E) OPHTHALMOLOGY 

This course on diseases of the eye will consist of one di- 
dactic hour each week in the Junior year, and two clinical 
hours per week in the Senior year, illustrated by the disease 
in the patient, by charts and blackboard drawings. Minor 
operations are performed before the class at the College 
Umic, and major operations at the County Hospital. Ample 
material is presented at both clinics. Practical instructions 

rinn a„5 y f a 7 gn ?" J" ,S eneral > the recognition, differentia- 
tion and treatment of the common, as well as the compli- 
cated diseases and injuries, the principles and clinical instruc- 
tion on refraction, the uses of the ophthalmoscope, the rec- 
ognition of diseases of the eye as diagnostic of disease in re- 
mote organs. Much effort is made in the teaching of this 
rSw 9 4Z ma r e ^ "? terest n ? and impressive to the student. 
{< 2-J .■°\ l McC °y and Assoc. Prof. George W. McCoy 

hours) cHni ° h ° UrS each section - Total - 57 

DIVISION VII. OBSTETRICS, GYNECOLOGY AND 
ABDOMINAL SURGERY 

CHARLES WILLIAM BRYSON, A.B., M.D., Professor of Gynecology 
Abdominal and Clinical Surgery gynecology, 

Hl N lY G E L ^OnTww^^ E J Mi) ' ^o^- of Obstetrics. 
HENRY W BnS T 2'n M ' D ." Associate Professor of Gynecology. 
*PHIL ROLLER A^ ' «"r?-' A As ! istant Professor of Gynecology 
*10HN C ipvfii ^ a' JJ'S" As * istant Professor of Gynecology 
OuTa McnIilL 'M n'' t MI ?" Assista "t Professor of Obstetrics. 
A i nm,™J 3 , MD> Lecture r on Obstetrics. 

' ETOAv/p mt?' r M - D - Instruct or in Gynecology. 
*rpm ^5nX,^5u5I- D .- Instruct or in Obstetrics. 
PETER OSDNm/„ B n"i S '' MD - In ^nctor in Obstetrics. 
i-JHHK O. SUNDIN, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

(A) OBSTETRICS 

Course 1. Sophomore Didactic Obstetrics. Instruction in 
Obstetrics is begun in the second semester of the Sophomore 

"On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



198 University of Southern California 

y ,ar, and is carried "t^^iAS" 
SUtTJKU "dry specl'tneos, aWToU, are _* » *ia 

course. , anlKrarp(; the anatomy of the 

^BS^f^r ***** 

Peter O. Sundin, didactic, 54 hours.) 

Course 2. Junior Didactic Obstetrks Lecture. ; an ^reci- 
tations are continued during £'*"$.*%&* The early 
embraces the Y^ ol %^ n P t a S Sases an5 complications in- 
recognition and treatment of .peases ana ^ J». incident 
cident to pregnancy; dystochia, and / bn ° rm a Q1 a Mc Neile 

a ° n d th Dr PU E e d g rM: &t&SS^t^i 

^SAfpaS^perSt^ J *. jA* during 
labor and the puerpenum, etc. This w one o mat * ria i 

obstetrical services in the west, and ^oes amp ^ 

Ret" (Sof JSKSffi 1 A%SSS cnnical, 24 hours.) j 

Course 4. Junior Manikin Obstetrics. f Under the super- 
vision of an instructor each student » reqmred t P^.^ 

each of the various obstetrical P ro « m u X n f s ° m of i abo r ( and 
The course includes a review of the mechanism 

a quiz upon operative obstetrics. (Ur. W™ 

Didactic, 36 hours.) . 

Course 5. Senior Didactic Obstetrics Lecture * and £ 

tations are continued during the {««* J^ e a ncounte red in 
the complications and. difficulties table md succes _ 

the practice of the science and art ot ■ obstetr g and 

sively considered viz: £°°™ a XTfs pVe/ to asepsis, 
abnormal puerpera. Special ^ atte " u ° n f forceps, and the 
external palpation, pervimetry, the use « or p , ^ 

C„«r,e .. Senior. Clinical Obatetricsc Sjte«ta.:tt£ 
fourth year »« "»>S" e ^'°. r ?'?Ece° or two weeks. The 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 199 

?! fi L °\ An f el ^ S ' ar V d annualI y handles from three hundred 

?u5ent ers r o e n a l C . 0nfinem ? nt CaS ,? S - Durin « hls residence he 
student personally examines all women applying for care 
during confinement, and is carefully instructed in ante- 
partum care, perimetry, and blood pressure estimates dur- 
ing pregnancy Each student conducts from twelve to fif- 

ng n Staff 0rS a '„rf nd -[ thC S 7 ervisi0 " ° f the ObsteTrt A«end- 
dinics 5 f"/™ 4 " 68868 f rom twenty to fifty labors in the 

mst tutinn, A f \ SPen rt y> C ° U . nty Hospital and other a lHed 

n baCLl, " delivery the student visits the mother 

r*t Zt , day for ten days > accustoming himself to the 

condidons 0rm The C t t S ^' f d e fly "cognition of abnormal 

Sft» Tn U d tst^ln^Lfet^ w^-all tfffi 
Pr°o r f k esSr n fnd d0 hTs 2fe£ "** S «»<™°° ° f *■ 
^P"" n ? hl8 service the student also attends the Obstetri- 
cal Clinics held weekly at each of our stations At these 

of the complications arising during pregnancy and 3 

(B) GYNECOLOGY AND ABDOMINAL SURGERY 

Course 1. Junior Gynecology. This course is given to the 
Junior Class in amphitheatre, college and hOspTtll cHnics 
and consists of lectures, recitations, manikin St and draw' 

clfni^rtnfcS dl i Pe ^ a 7 W X k and bedside and w^d 
fnt« .. ♦■ Co " nt y Hospital. The Junior Class is divided 

into sections, under competent instructors, and are required 

me^t and m/nf ' ^T^ ^^> Su ^ est diagnosSTreat- 
S! a „ ?♦ d management in individual cases, go over arain 

are tT.TZ and P hvsiol °^ ? f the female generative plexus 
are taken over and over again the etiology of diseases Xv 

ly and n well US Th a ir "" f ° Undation <? f <^«o?ogJ' wfbrS^ 
n fhf 5 ■ S C °. U / se P re Pares the student for work given 

ul\J.U%/ e A- r A ( ^ S l OC - Prof - Southworth, Drs. Bolle? and 
Totat fie 6!) d hours dl ) daCt,C h ° UrS ' U « { ™ h °™ each ~tig! 

SuSe U ry e This 8 ™^—* 1 ^^J** a *° Abdominal 

confists' of tir, S g ',, Ven at , tJ ? e Countv Hospital and 

theatre where th?Z\' ^ ^^ in the Sur S ical Amphi- 
meatre, where the entire class witness and have exolained 
to them minutely the different methods and the various tech- 



200 University of Southern California 

niq «e, as well as the VB^^^^^S^ 

?S«^=?^ and manip " 

ulations. (Prof. Bryson, 72 clinic hours.; 

C urse 3. Senior Clinical <*^' ™^u?£ 

Jcs.at the College ^H«ffS^»'*«r 
amine, diagnose and treat P^ents £ ient j fl gyne cologi- 

fessor in charge, in order to Deco me y student 

cal diagnosis and treatment In thus bring g ^ 
in close personal relation with * la rg l e nu different methods of 
cases, he femilmizea himself wjh the d« ^ accus . 

examining patients and ^t *e same mn j g tment as 

tomed to making d W^^S at all of the minor 
well as witnessing closely and assisting minal surgery . 

and major operations in StfneccAogy m be thoroug hly cov- 
Diseases of the bladder and u«tna wm ical treat - 

ered in this department and their mefccaj ana g^.^ 
ment out ined and de m°nst«Ued Memo ^ ^ . 

examination will be taught ftyuw pract ical manipu- 

kins, as well as «Pon^livin| subject^ i P fifst 

lation and use of the cystoscope w . . the CHm _ 

bladder phantoms then upon the hv ing su J practical 

cal Department A thoroug ^^JSiSl Surgery in its 

Kest^ 
5^4i^BffiS3^a&. tl»t will come to him 

theatre to the Senior class «P°" the T m i°"ou r se will be illus- 
jects embraced in this department This course w and 

{rated by charts, ^^""KeSand methods 
will embrace important matter «- de tail meas u ating 

that connol .be given for f ck tun £^h| M^ which I 
Amphitheatre. There are many oa have> 

maintain the properly ^.mXtSrtifconferences. Why? 
and which must be given in ^^^Vai major cases must 
Because at a. clinic pe™d when severaim) ^ 

be operated, time is a ^^^""^Sential .are necessarily 
calls for raPid action and many ease time the ea r 

passed .oyer. If the eye can^ understanding is 



hours.) 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 201 

TEXT BOOKS 
DIVISION I. 

Anatomy. Gray (New English Edition), Cunningham's 
"Manual of Dissection/' Piersol, Morris. Atlases and Collat- 
eral Reading: Quain's "Anatomy"; Holden; McClellan's 
"Regional Anatomy"; Deaver's "Surgical Anatomy"; Edin- 
ger's "Anatomy of the Nervous System'; Huntington's 
"Anatomy of the Peritoneum and Abdominal Cavity"; So- 
botta and McMurrich's "Atlas of Human Anatomy"; Toldt's 
"Atlas of Human Anatomy"; Spalteholz's "Atlas of 
Anatomy." 

Histology. Schaeffer; Bailey; Bohm; Davidoff; Huber; 
Piersol; Jordan & Ferguson. 

Embryology. McMurrich; Prentiss; Bailey; "Human Em- 
bryology" by Kieble and Mall; Heissler. 

DIVISION II. 
Reference Books: 

Inorganic Chemistry: Smith; Remsen; Henderson. 

Organic Chemistry: Cohen; Perkin and Kipping; McCol- 
lum; Norris. 

Toxicology: fBrundage; Witthaus and Becker; Peterson 
and Haines; Autenrieth-Warren. 

Physiological Chemistry: fMathews; Hammerstein. 

Laboratory Manual: fFolin; Hawk. 

Dietetics: fLusk; Tibbies. 

DIVISION III. 
Physiology 

Class room: Howells. 
Laboratory : Cannon. 

Reference: Stewart; Starling; Tigerstedt. 
Pharmacology 

Class room: Cushny. 

Laboratory: Bush; Jackson. 

Reference: Sollman; U. S. Dispensatory. 

DIVISION IV. 

Bacteriology. *Park and Williams; *Kendall, Hiss and 
Zinser; Kolmer; Zinser. 

^ P . at < hology - * Adan i and McCrea; McCallom; *Mallory and 
Wright; *Mallory. 

Clinical Microscopy. *Simon; *Sahli; Emerson; Wood. 

Hygiene. ^Harrington; *Rosenan. 



t Students must provide themselves with these books. 
*T?xt books recommended, 



202 University of Southern California 

DIVISION V. 

Practice. Anders; Osier; Tyson; Edwards; Manson, Jack- 
son, Herchfelder. 

Diagnosis. Butler (for Sophomores); 9 s £ r ^tler; Emer- 
son; Anders-Boston; Cabot's Diseases of the Blood ; Todd ^s 
Manual of Clinical Diagnosis; Da-Costa; C. B. Slade, Fhy 
sical Examination and Diagnosis"; Musser. 

Therapeutics. Shoemaker; Potter; Butler; Wood; torch- 
heimer; Hare. . 

Medical Tuberculosis. Medical Diagnosis, Greene; Physi- 
cal Diagnosis, Cabot; Tuberculin in Diagnosis and I Treat- 
ment Pottenger; Tuberculin in Diagnosis and Treatment, 
Homman and g Walman; Clinical Tuberculosis, Pottenger. 

Pedriatics. Grulee; Holt; Kerley. Collateral reading: 
Rotch; Koplik; Chapin; Jacobi; Kerr; Pfaundler and Schloss- 
man; Dennett; Wachenheim; Talbot; Fisher. 

Neurology and Psychiatry. Purves Stewart; Bing- Allen; 
"Outlines of Psychiatry" by W A. White; Diefendorff; Mod 
ern Treatment of Mental and Nervous Diseases by White 
and Jelliffe. 

Dermatology. Sufton; Stelwagon; Pusey; Schamberg. 
Electro-Therapeutics. Potts, Electricity, Medical and Sur- 
gical Mclnfosh Practical Hand-Book of Medical Electricity. 
Roentgenology. "X-Rays, How to Produce," by Harold 
Mowat. " 

Medical Jurisprudence. Draper; Witthaus and Becker 
Forensic; "Medicine and Toxicology," Peterson and Haines. 

DIVISION VI. 

General Surgery. DaCosta; Wyeth; Lexer-Bevan; Rose 
and Carless Scudder's Treatment of Fractures; Stimson on 
Fractures ln«J f Dislocations; Bryan's Principles of Surgery. 

Operative Surgery. Bryant; Bickham; Treayes; Keen. 

Minor Surgery. Foote; "Bandaging" by Writing. 

Ortohpedic Surgery. Whitman; Bradford and Lovett; 
Young; Willard. 

Genito-Urinary Diseases. Thomson Walker; Greene and 
Brooks- White and Martin; Kelly and Burnam; Albarran; 
Gouley Wossidlo, Asch or Luys on Gonorrhea. 

Otology, Laryngology and Rhinology. The collateral read- 
ing advised on this subject is such works as D. Braden Kyle, 
"Diseases of Nose and Throat"; J. J. Kyle, 3rd Edition, 
"Diseases of Ear, Nose and Throat"; Bishop on ",?>»««« °- 
the Nose, Throat and Ear"; Bacon on "Otology ; Barnhill- 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 203 

Wales, Modern Otology; Packard, Diseases of Nose, Throat 
and Ear. 

Ophthalmology. May; Fox; De Schweinitz, or Fuchs. 

DIVISION VII. 

Obstetrics. De Lee; Cragin; Williams; Edgar. 

Gynecology and Abdominal Surgery. Ashton; Gilliam: 
Montgomery; Dudley; Reed; Graves; Crossen; Kelly's Oper- 
ative Gynecology; Surgical Diseases of Abdomen, by Doug- 
las; Abdominal Operations, by Moynihan 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

FOREWORD 

n ?T a wver*s office The most noteworthy feature m the 

iTcteVedT/the law Mmb^e entire field of 
law y and is designed to develop the student and fit h.m for 
the active duties of a practicing lawyer. 

Association of American Law Schools 
The College of Law, University of Southern California, is 
a member of the Association of American Law Schools. 

ADVANTAGES OF LOCATION 

law, no school could pay salar ies suffici ** to sec ure^ their 
«.rvices To the student of law the Law Library ana tne 
awyer's office are what the laboratory is to ' ^X^of the 
dent Many of our Seniors and some of the members ot tne 
First and Second Year Classes do work ,n law offices, or at 

lea Tte h rarfrrin a the 1 % r aIo^ P u 1 iM! e n g g: S corner of First street 
an^roaaway! occupy all" of the fourth and fifth floors. 
The Courts 
The Suoreme Court of the State holds two sessions each 
Jr in T os Aneeles and the students have opportunity to 

ten days each semester. 



College of Larv 205 

The ^United States District Court is held here, and oppor- 
tunity for study of the Federal practice and procedure is thus 
ottered, on both the law and the equity sides 

The Appellate Court for the Southern District of Califor- 
nia holds its session in Los Angeles. 

_ The Superior Court of Los Angeles County, consisting of 
eighteen departments, is in session the entire year 

Four city Police Courts and four Township 'justice's 
Courts, in which students can get some actual practice before 
admission to the bar, are in session daily during the entire 

Library Facilities 

Students are allowed the use of the Los Angeles County 
Law Library, consisting of thirty thousand (30,000) volumes 
upon the same terms as members of the Bar. 

The College of Law has a good working 'library of its 
own consisting of State Reports, the Reporter System, the 

M^ Text and other case books ' numbering 

Eastern Students 

To the increasing number of Eastern students spending a 
few years in Southern California, special opportunity is 
given for fitting for the practice of law. Those intending to 
practice in common-law states should notice that an entire 
semester is devoted to the study of common-law pleading. 

law in any'Ttate. gFadUateS ° f ** C ° Uege to practice 



CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION 

th Jw ^ thr f e daS ,l e s S ^admission: (a) Admission to 
(£ I a - y ™ ? lasS J (b) Admission as a special student, 
(c) Admission to advanced standing. 

H^r-^ dm -r S I f i0n t0 - the first year class of candidates for 
fn S fhtr n re q u T lr .t ments A are the same as for admission 
to the College of Liberal Arts (see pages 39 to 46, of the 

.Wr? r U ear Boo V>? f °^ year hi ^ h sch ° o1 course includ- 
llrl X "S p . rescrlbed subjects. Candidate presenting evi- 
dence of having completed such a course in an accredited 
secondary school may be admitted without examination out 
mu e s rbe SU p C a h ss e e V d denCe " "* pre ' ented ^^ examinations 



206 University of Southern California 

It is recommended that the following subjects be included: 

2 unit9 

English " . 2 

A Foreign Language - j 

Laboratory Science - 2 

Algebra and Plane Geometry..... x 

United States History and Civics ZZ.'Z." 7 

Electives 

The laboratory science may be Botany, Zoology, Physiol- 
ogy, Physics, or Chemistry. 

Complete list of admission subjects from which entrance 
credits may be presented. 

5- G ?r%^LZ°r "til E^:..™^..^=^ 

gS: L^'A&fc;: i SSSSMS=W=2=£ 

Eng. Lit, History of A ^igeD Advanced 1 

Latin, Elementary - f 2 ^£e deomctry 1 

Latin, Advanced A » | j Trigonometry V* 

Greek, Elementary v 2 gane ^ * 

Greek, Advanced i Botanv — t 

German, Elementary •-- 2 |^J 1 

German, Advanced 1. ? £°<^gLv „ 1 



French, Elementary - | physics ...".*-"....., J 

French, Advanced L 2 H^f-' 1 

Spanish, Elementary - 2 ^^f & eography 1 

Spanish, Advanced ----- x » * funeral Science .... 1 

History, Grecian _and Roma* ,: 1 g^*£ c f£ a ^ *. 1 



S8S: ias^r sate* jg^sa^ 

e™ sr^-A "IZZ 1 Vocational Subjects 1. *J 



History, English 



Application should first be made to the Registrar of the 

prlspecrive ".udenlfare orge'd to make applicauor. before 

the formal registration dates. 

b Special Students. The Dean may admit as a spedal 

has not the required qualifications. 

c Admission to Advanced Standing. Applicants for ad- 

IkTXV r.*S*«i1^ « high aod whose eooese ,. « 



College of Law 207 

extensive as that here given. Applicants for advanced 
standing not having such certificates must pass examina- 
tion m the subjects for which they seek credit, but any stu- 
dent who desires to take such an examination must first 
secure permission to do so from the Dean. Such examina- 
tions are given only at the beginning of a semester. A 
cnarge of five dollars is made for each special examination. 

DEGREES 

The various courses of study lead to the following degrees: 
The degree of Master of Laws (LL.M.) may be conferred 
upon those students who hold the degree of Bachelor of 
i^aws (LL.ti.) trom this, or an approved institution maintain- 
ing a three years' course of study, and who have completed 

Collee of Law 6 " 1 f °" rth yCar ° f W ° fk P rescribed b ^ this 
.J, he f de « r , ee ° f J urJ s Doctor (J.D.) is conferred upon those 
students who have received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
(A.if.) or a substantially equivalent degree in the University 
^.c;? U u California, or in an approved College or. Uni- 
versity; who have pursued the study of law in this depart- 

^rfhL K ree .J ea ^ S » nd competed k *"" the curriculum 
prescribed by this College of Law, or who have completed 

tlr^ a ?v.- ln ^ n „ appr0ve J d L , aw Sch o o1 and taken the third 

year in this College; and who have maintained a standard 

of scholarship for the three-year course of at least eighty- 

f l r f cent. The A B degree must have been secured 

of Law ing UP ° n yCar ° f W ° rk in the ColIe ^ e 

s J<tJ« 8r Z e ° f Bach e lor of L?ws (LL.B.) is conferred upon 
iZr ™ ° are f radu ,ates of a high school maintaining a 

t!nn «f ° ?Ur . Se ° ? St , udy ' , or of another educational institu- 
n thk r Q n1W D f ™ n k Wh ° have pursued t^ study of law 
Srt^i f Col I e ^ e for three years, or in any approved Law 
School for two years followed by one year in this Collee-e 
completing m full the course prescribed in this instituS- 
S h;n^f° at h f Ve t mamtained throughout a standard of scholar^ 
ship of at least seventy-five per cent in every subject 
degrees! rCCelVed ln Summe r Session will count toward such 

94^emes^ S r tU r d r^; t in r^ F°J^ ge ?, f Liberal Arts h as received 
thelthV. ■* c^d'ts (including all prescribed work) and of 
Art, of fh K*° n °t Iess than 32 in the College of Liberal 
the VnlW* University of Southern California, he may enter 
the College of Law, and may receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts upon the satisfactory completion If two years in 
the professional course, and the degree of Juris Doctor upon 
libera? Arts" ^ tatW ' F ° V details See Under CoUegeTf 



208 University of Southern California 

PRE-LEGAL COURSE 

It is important that the student ^be {ho^hg Prep^d 
before commencing the ^ ^J^p./iegal Course as ont- 
iBft^tff^tt'yBSffl *■*» entering 

First Year 

BOTH SEMESTERS , 

Units per 

Semesters 

.... 3 

English 1 (Composition) 3 

Economics 1 (Principles) 2 

Ko^^sScl orMathem^cs:::::::::::: .......a or * 

Foreign Language* 



Second Year 

BOTH SEMESTERS 



2 



History 14 (English Constitutional) — ^^ 3 

Psychology , 2 

Political Science - 2 

Public Speaking . 3 

Foreign Language 

Third Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Economics 9 (Municipal Problems) ZZZZZZ 3 

Sociology 2 (Principles) ----- 3 

History 16 (American Government) ZZZZZ, 3 

Logic zzzzzzz. \ 

Ethics V"^"" l 

Debate and Argumentation - 

SECOND SEMESTER 

.... 3 

Economics (Labor ^ M ^%^^^y)ZZZZZ 2 or 3 

Sociology (Immigration or Criminology; 3 

History 16 (American Government) --- 3 or 2 

Flective in Philosophy ----; --' 3 

Arties and Governments, of Europe -- 2 

Debate and Argumentation 



College of Law 209 

ATTENDANCE AND SCHOLARSHIP 

The Dean calls attention to the privilege extended to law 
students of taking four hours of instruction, free, at the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts. By taking advantage of this privilege, 
a student may get selected portions of a college course. 

A grade of 75%, or over, on examinations and daily work 
in each subject, is required for promotion or graduation. 

In text book or case courses in which there is a daily quiz 
the daily work counts for 60% and the final examination 
for 40%. 

Absence detracts from scholarship. Each absence in excess 
of one in a one period course, two in a two period course, and 
three in a three period course, per semester, will receive a 
zero mark. If, however, the student, upon return to class, 
files an abstract of work done during his absence, the zero 
mark may be raised to a maximum grade of 85%, depending 
upon the merit of the brief. This brief must be filed within 
one week after returning to class, provided, however, that 
the instructor may extend this time only in case of absence 
because of protracted illness. Promotion is not granted in 
any subject when the attendance falls below 75% of recita- 
tion periods of that subject. 

Persons twenty-one years of age, or over, not studying 
for a degree, may, by permission of the Dean, enter the 
College of Law as special students, and may pursue such 
studies as they desire. This provision is made especially for 
the aid of those seeking or holding positions of trust in banks 
and other business institutions. 

Any student displaying deficiencies in English diction or 
usage may at any time be required to take instruction in the 
class in Expression. 

The school reserves the right to expel any student when- 
ever the Board of Control deems it necessary for the welfare 
of the College of Law, and to suspend any student or use 
other methods of discipline, whenever such action is deemed 
advisable by the Dean. 

Special Examinations. Any student registering for the 
regular course who desires to take a special examination on 
any subject must file in the office a petition asking for the 
privilege and stating his reasons therefor. The petition is 
referred to the Dean. If the permission is granted, a special 
examination may be given. Such examination and all exam- 
inations for advanced standing are given at the beginning of 
a semester. Passing grade upon all such examinations is 
eighty-five per cent. A charge of $5.00 is made for each 
special examination. 



210 University of Southern California 

THE CURRICULUM 

School. 

I. REGULAR SESSION 

?o practice in all the courts of this or any other State, and 
in the Federal Court. 

The method of instruction is a combination of the lecture, 
teSbook and case systems, with practica 1 expenenc e ,„ 

bers of the Facultylssign subjects for briefs m connection 
with their respective classes. 

On account of the large number of students enrolled the 
Masses are divided into several sections. These meet at 
different times of the day, so that students may select a 
section to suit their own convenience. 

All regular students of the ^w department are entitled to 
four hours of instruction per week in the College of Liberal 
Arts without additional cost. 

Tn addition to the subjects listed in the following schedule, 
special lectures are provided during the : year = t subjects 
JtuVh thoueh not really required in a legal course, are yet 
^m^'chvafue to those y desiring a well-rounded knowledge 

of the law. 

The duration of each period specified below is one and one- 
half hours. 

First Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Contracts (Two Periods). Clair S. Tappaan 

Criminal Law (T^^^^^^p^^tammon 
Elementary""Law and Blackstone (Three P^ds)^...^^ 

T-«,f";""7Twn'Pe'rTodsS ZZZZ'.".Kemper B. Campbell 

Torts (Two Ferioas; Frank M. Porter 

Bailments (Two Periods) **ranK »*• r«H» 



College of Larv 2 1 1 

Debating (One Period) Gertrude Comstock, Hugh Neal 

Wells. 
Practice Court (One Period) 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Contracts, including Quasi Contracts, Partnership 
Agency and Guaranty and Suretyship (Three Per- 

r . 1 ? ds > - -• Clair S. Tappaan 

Criminal Procedure (Penal Code and Selected Cases) 

(One Period)..Paul J. McCormick and Percy V. Hammon 

Torts (Two Periods) Kemper B. Campbell 

Personal Property and Sales (Two Periods) 

_ • : Frank M t Porter and Chas. E." "Miliikan 

Law of Persons (One Period) Vincent Morgan 

Debating (One Period) Gertrude Comstock and Hugh Neal 
Wells. to 

Statutory Interpretation (One Period) T. W Robinson 

Patents (One Period) F. L. A. Graham 

Practice Court (One Period) 

Second Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Common Law Pleading (Two Periods).... Victor R. McLucas 

Private Corporations (One Period) Frederick W Houser 

Real Property I (Two Periods) Kemper B. Campbell 

Lquity Jurisprudence and Procedure (Two Periods) 

~ "". : : Chas. C t Montgomery 

Constitutional Law (Two Periods)..,. James S. McKnight 

Bills and Notes (Two Periods) Clair S. Tappaan 

Practice Court (One Period) 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Private Corporations (One Period)....Frederick W. Houser 

Equity Jurisprudence and Procedure (Two Periods) 

^ ;*"•— Chas. C. Montgomery 

Real Property I (Two Periods) Kemper B. Campbell 

Mining Law (One Period) Lewis A. Groff 

Wills and Probate Practice (Three Periods) 

^ '"-/"■ "~-- ; ......Victor R. McLucas 

Research (One Period) Victor R. McLucas 

Water Rights and Irrigation Law (One Period) 

^ "V "- - Gavin W. Craig 

Practice Court (One Period) 



212 University of Southern California 

Third Year 



FIRST SEMESTER 



Code Pleading (Two Periods) James G. Scarborough and 
Vincent Morgan. Tr,,„i, m Porter 

Evidence (Three Periods) Jg£*; Porter 

Public Corporations (Two Periods;. ...~-- ~»y 

F°d«r,l Jurisdiction and f'^^St.S™,, 

Practice Court (One Period) 



SECOND SEMESTER 



Code Pleading (Two Periods) James G. Scarborough and 

Vincent Morgan. M 

Real Property II (Two Periods; --.-. 

Evidence (Three Periods) F^ank P Doherty 

Damages (One Period) - SvinW Craig 

Securities (One Period) E W Tuttle 

Admiralty (One Period : -^ • A / Gibson 

Appeals (Lectures) - ~ •» Robinson 

^"V^Ws^recTures)""' ZZ~i2j£^/bU4& 

Legal Ethics (Lectures) ... . 

Bankruptcy (Lectures) ZZZ.iorman Sterry 

Advocacy (Lectures) ■--- 

Practice Court (One Period) 

II. EVENING SESSION 

In response to a general demand for night classes in law 
an Evening Session was established at the beginning of he 
vear 1908-1909. The night course consists of the same sub- 
jects as the day course, but requires four years and three 
summers for completion. The instructors are the same as 
those of the Day School. 

Only three years of the Evening Session are taught each 
year, the third and fourth year alternating. 



College of Law 213 

First Year 



FIRST SEMESTER 



Contracts (Two Periods) Clair 9 Tannin 

Criminal Law (Two Periods) ZleSV'lSS 

Elementary Law and Blackstone (Three Periodsj K. 

Gavin W. Craig 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Contracts (Three Periods) Clair S T.nno^ 

Bailments (Two Periods)' Frank mC 

Personal Property and Sales iT^^^JZ^ M ' FOTttr 
• Frank M. Porter and Chas. E. Millikan 

SUMMER 

PaTen^s Sue^eS) ^ ***«? ^.n 

Criminal Procedure (OnrP^d^rrJSreyV H »SS 

Second Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 
SECOND SEMESTER 

Torts (Two Periods) Kemner R r, m „k 11 

Mining Law (One Period) ZZ Tewis A Troff 

Pnvate Corporations (One Period). iZiFredericTw H?usef 

Research (One Period) Victor R mViII 

Bankruptcy (Lectures) W t r ? 

rfefaL E X S <4 Ct -^ S) :::: - : " : "---"-B'eniaminF.Bledsof 

SSS'ffi Tonfperiod) Hugh NeaI Wells 

SUMMER 

Statutory Interpretation (One Period) T. W Robinson 

Morgan" 6 Peri ° d) Frank R D ° herty ^ Vincen" 



214 University of Southern California 

Third Year 

(Offered 1918-1919) 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Evidence (Three Periods) Frank M. Porter 

Conflict of Laws (Two Periods ) Victor R. McLucas 

Equity Jurisprudence and Procedure (Two Periods 

* Chas. C. Montgomery 

Practice Court (One Period) 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Evidence (Three Periods) . Frank M. Porter 

Equity Jurisprudence and Procedure (Two Periods) 

Chas. C, Montgomery 

Water Rights (One Period) Gavin W. Craig 

Admiralty (One Period) E. W. Tuttle 

Practice Court (One Period) 

SUMMER 

Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure (One Period) 

Chas. C* Montgomery 

Securities (One Period) :. Gavin W. Craig 

Conveyancing (One Period) W. S. Allen 

Fourth! Year 

(Offered 1919-1920) 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Code Pleading (Two Periods) Vincent Morgan 

Real Property I (Two Periods) Kemper B. Campbell 

Constitutional Law (Two Periods) James S. McKnight 

Public Corporations (Two Periods) ......Byron C. Hanna 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Code Pleading (Two Periods) Vincent Morgan 

Real Property I (Two Periods)..., Kemper B. Campbell 

Real Property II (Two Periods) Vincent Morgan 

Wills and Probate Practice (Three Periods) 

Victor R. McLucas „ 

Appeals (Lectures) James A. Gibson 

Land Titles (Lectures) O. R. W. Robinson 

Practice Court (One Period) 



College of Lav> 215 

III. GRADUATE COURSE 

Lectures) Mining Law (Twelve 

Pub he Officers (Ten Lectures) WaSer F w«^ 

Logic (One Period) 1 rFestus Edward' O^ven 

Fraternal Insurance (Six Lectures).. Carlos S HaTSU 

Medical Jurisprudence (Ten Lectures) " Carlos I' £rdv 

Stf L ^ ( °, ne Peri ° d) ..-Thomas A eS 

Philosophy of Law (One Period) Warren E Lloyd 

History of Jurisprudence (One Period)..... Lewis A Groff 

California Codes (One Period) Byron C Hanna 

Comparative Constitutional Law (One Period) 

Restr^nt^ 

Extraordinary Provisional Remedies (One Period) _ 

tj ui"""r* •""".' • Thomas C. Berkebile 

Public Commission Practice (One Period).... 

Jurisdiction and Juagme'^ 

Chas. C. Montgomery 

tr,«;f art i? f } h - e COUrse wiU consist of ^e completion of a 

ud ect m uZ mg U tl} C resu .Jt» of « investigation on some 

nrfif ° i a ?* Is re< 3 U!re d that this shall be a piece of 

nl£ f a "'- Se r s research, demonstrating the writers 

™«erLvZ?f ^T^' ^.thorough grasp of theTubjec 

a^rhn,«l» ' d h J S ab ' hty to present h 's material in 

kss than ter,. an n tyl \- TI,e thesis must contain no* 
itss than 5,000 words. The subject must be presented to the 

feanhv «,K al h - y .?T mbtr lst; a fairly complete bib! 
•ography must be similarly presented by February 1st- and 

man Mayls't ^ mUSt be SUbmitted t0 the Dean not late? 



2 1 6 University) of Southern California 

IV. SUMMER SCHOOL 

The Summer Session of the College of Law affords to those 
who expect to earn a part, or all, of their expenses while 
going through school, an opportunity to lessen the amount 
of study required for the following year. In addition, it 
furnishes an opportunity for those who have failed in any 
subject to make it up, and it also provides a way for those 
who are irregular, because of having taken a part of their 
course in some other Law School or for any other rea- 
son, to make up back work. Students in the Night School 
are required to take certain subjects during the summer 
which are not taught at night during the regular school year. 

The Summer School lasts about nine weeks, and is con- 
ducted by the regular teachers. 

The Summer Session of the current year will begin June 
10th, 1918. The subjects taught in the Day School will be 
selected from the following: 

Day School 

Criminal Law, ($10.00); 5:15 p. m. 
Common Law Pleading, ($10.00); 5:15 p. m. 
Bills and Notes, ($10.00); 5:15 p. m. 
Constitutional Law, ($10.00): 5:15 p. m. 
Private Corporations, ($10.00); 5:15 p. m. 

Night School 

The first and second series of the Night School will be 
taught at the same time. 

First Series: Domestic Relations, ($6.00); 7:00 p. m., fol- 
lowed by Patents ($6.00); 7:00 p. m., followed by Statutory 
Interpretation, ($6.00); 7:00 p. m., followed by Criminal 
Procedure, ($6.00); 7:00 p. m. 

Second Series: Damages, ($6.00); 7:00 p. m., followed by 
Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure, ($6.00); 7:00 p. m., fol- 
lowed by Conveyancing, ($6.00); 7:00 p. m., followed by Se- 
curities, ($6.00); 7:00 p. m. 

THE PRACTICE COURT 

Members of the second and third year classes are as- 
signed not less than two cases during each semester, which ; 
they are required to conduct through the Superior Court, and 
two of which must be taken upon appeal through the Appel- 
late or Supreme Courts. Controversies are arranged and 
assigned upon statements of facts for trial. 



College of Lar» 2 1 7 

All of the steps incident to a contested trial are taken, 
including preparation of pleadings, argument or motions, and 
demurrers; preparation of briefs, including trial brief of law 
and facts; taking of depositions; impaneling of jury; chal- 
lenges; introductions of evidence; argument of cases;' etc. 

Students of the first year act as witnesses, clients, and 
jurors. These trials are presided over by a member of 
the faculty, and are conducted as nearly as possible in 
the same manner as trials in actual courts. Each student 
in the first and second years must write at least three briefs, 
which are examined and graded by the Judge of the Practice 
Court. 

The Practice Courts consist of the Justice's Court, the 
Superior Court, the Court of Appeal, and the Supreme Court. 
The procedure conforms to that of the State of California, . 
with pleadings under the code. Sessions of the Courts are 
held weekly. A student acts as clerk of the Practice Court, 
and is at the Law School throughout the day. Tuesday 
evening of each week is set apart for Practice Court. On 
each Tuesday evening twelve departments are in session. 



ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATING 



The course in Argumentation and Debating is designed to 
meet the needs of the students of the Department of Law. 
The work is of the most practical character. 

. . . "These, then, are the problems we have to consider — 
the use of the universal laws of reasoning, the development 
of the habit of analysis and of unprejudiced methods of inves- 
tigation, the secret of clear and rapid expression of intellec- 
tual processes, and the art of adapting one's material to his 
hearers so as to win their favor and affect their conduct." 

In Public Speaking, most of the work is of an extempora- 
neous nature, such as short talks on current public questions 
speech analysis, as well as enlargement of vocabulary, and 
the correction of mannerisms, and wrong habits of speech 
Attention is also given to the study and delivery of great 
orations, and to the preparation of original orations. 

Students doing work in these classes may receive credit in 
the College of Oratory to apply upon either of the regular 
courses. 



218 University of Southern California 

INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATE 

Su^S.^l&ISS to .!,„,« follow in t,a,n- 
taS T,!r ■•Si's'iS" is'S^To"™- o< a Try-Ou, 

deta.es are arranged each year between smaller colleges and 

"'mHubiecHor the try-out debates lor the year 1917-1918 
was "Resolved that during the present war the F.d.ra 
Government should employ consenptmn of labof. Ten de 

Es S ie' ^^^m^e^/sff S £ES 

Sffitofe nar^y, .'lXS2%£f!?^ 

™ We and a major debate for women with Stanford Uni- 
S?S The CoUege of Law offers the same forensic oppor- 
lun ty y tolomen! ^it offers to men. It has been the custom 
to hold a classic debate for men with some tar £ Eastern 
TTn versitv or Middle Western Umversjty. This debate was 
2?mtaated this year on account of the war. Arrangements 
ha" b en made^o inaugurate a similar event for women 

*s£ %r*AS&UZ -^; t he v wo s £} 

Se Law School, and tentative arrangements have already 
been made for such an event. 

Men who participate in intercollegiate debates are ehgib e 
to receive the honorary Tau Kappa Alpha degree wh.k 
women debaters are eligible to receive the Tau Kappa Alpha 
auxiliary degree of Theta Kappa Alpha. 



College of Law 219 

STUDENT ASSOCIATIONS 

The Debating Clubs 

The first year Debating Classes are under the supervision 
ot the College, and attendance at ninety per cent of the 
meetings is compulsory on all regular students of the Fresh- 
men Ulass. 

The Lyceum is a debating club having a restricted mem- 
bership, and is composed of members of the second and 
tnird year classes. 

The Oratorical Association 

thJnnrnn^ «* h< J ?1 ? ratori . cal Association is organized for 
the purpose of stimulating interest in oratory 

Occidental College, Pomona College, Whittier College and 
the University of Southern California compose an Oratorical 
Association. Students of the Law Department are eg 
as representatives of the University in the contests 

™, A *?c - pnze °i $ / 5 , is awar ded the winner of the local try- 
out; $15 is awarded the contestant taking second place; and 
$10 is given the one taking third place. 
A contest is also held between representatives of the same 

o?tte C a ed /5 e ^ PeaC - e ° rat ° rical Contest. A cash prize 
of $100 is awarded the winner of the inter-collegiate event. 

Fraternities and Sororities 
rJ h k^ Ve Ai na . ti0 £ al , le « al fraternities, Phi Delta Phi, Delta 
h C a h ve Sapte^heS 6 ^' ™* ^ Ph! " d S * ma » U Phi 

Ka A pp C a h T.pha , f ^^^SSSST " ^ ^"^ ^ 

Ch£S*? h * Ddta Delta Women's Legal Fraternity, Alpha 
felri r S '« anized her / in 1911. Since that time other 
don granted, making it a national organiza- 

T A ^ Ch £ Pter °*, th . e somen's honorary forensic fraternity, 
Theta Kappa Alpha, is also maintained. 

No additional Fraternities or Sororities may be organized 
without permission from the Board of Control ° rgamzed 

THE ALUMNI MEDAL 

LJJl iS * P i ize [ S an unu s"ally elaborate gold medal, which is 
R adua tin\, e r£r a h at Commencement to that member of the 
graduating class who shall have maintained the highest gen- 
l vera « e ]n scholarship throughout the whole College 
Eshelman WaS aW3rded in 1917 to J 0Se P h ?■ 



220 University of Southern California 

ATHLETICS 

baseball and tennis teams, and during the P ast J ear f " th . 
with the best representatives of the other colleges ot bouin 
ern California. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Entrance fee (required upon »&^J^g2g& ? 45'.00 

Day Session (nine hours or over), per semester ^ 

(For less than nine hours a reduction is made.) 

Nigh Fre S shman7ear (seven hours or over) per semester 25.00 

Other years (seven hours or over), per semester.... Jo.w 

(For less 7 than seven hours a reduction is made.) ^ 

Postgraduate course -~ ''" 10 .00 

AtoaftSle^^ S 00 

tion) : -•• .... 5.00 

Special examinations, each....... C~"f*"* ",'emester 

Change in schedule more than week after semester ^ 

Fdi e u g re n \o"'pay'f'ees'when'duelebarf 

No refund ?s made except in case of sickness, and none is 

ma Ttt e o r sPec^ive d stdent%Crd te expect in incidentals, such 

rS%o^^^ 

Fee* fo 5 r°Class Work, Public Speaking,p« semester (2^^ 
Pe FeetforPrirate'in7t"r'uction charged according to length of 

no serious difficulty is experienced in finding sucn opponu 
nities. 

Address all communications to 

FRANK M. PORTER, Dean 

College of Law, University of Southern California, 

Tajo Building, First and Broadway, 

Los Angeles. 



. THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 

In compliance with the resolutions adopted by the Ameri- 
A a K In \ t i t . u ^ 0f ? ental Te achers at the meeting at Ann 
Arbor, Michigan, January 26th, 1915, to the effect that "all 
colleges holding membership in this organizations shall as 
tar as possible announce in their catalogues a ceriod of regis- 
tration (matriculation) prior to the date of opening of the 
formal course of instruction, and that the registration shall 
fW^" St day of the cour se of instruction; and further, 

mat those cases of students presenting themselves after the 
close of said period of registration be reviewed by the whole 
faculty and proper recommendations made in the premises, 
for the approval of the State Board of Dental Examiners," 
this College will register (matriculate) the Junior and Senior 
students at any time after the issuance to them of a certifi- 
cate of promotion up to the day set for the opening of the 
regular course of lectures. The matriculation book will be 
open for Freshman students from the day following com- 
mencement day up to the day of the opening of the Regular 
session It therefore follows that Freshman students may 
S£ »Z % .° r l he s || s ' on T 19!7-'18 at any time between June 
9th and September 27th, Junior and Senior students at any 
time between the receipt by them of the certificate of pro- 

Z° r 97 t u T the .u° penmg °J the re ^ uIar session on Septem- 
ber ^/th. In the case of students having been prevented 
from matriculating within the limits of time herein specified 
their cases will be reviewed by the faculty and if found that 
they are able to successfully make up the amount of work 
covered prior to their admission as students, they will be 
™ l , ere ln . th , e . matriculation book as regular students. All 
students should be in attendance at the opening of the session. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The College of Dentistry of the University of Southern 
California was organized and formally opened for students 
twenty-two years ago. It is under the control of a Board of 
t,^ ee Vt n - 1S lncor P° rat ed strictly as an educational insti- 
tution. Ihe income from all sources is expended for instruc- 
tion and new equipment, educational results being the goal 
of the institution. B 

fJ!?h B °* ar l of T, ruste es is composed of members of the 
Faculty of the College of Dentistry, representatives of the 
Southern California TJental Association, the Los Angeles 
County Dental Society, the Alumni of the College, and the 
Trustees of the University of Southern California 



222 University of Southern California 

As a member of .the National Association d ; DegJJwuj. 
ties, and the Institute of Dental T e ^ rs - t^ ^o | ^ 

to the betterment of mankind. - 

of thirty-two weeks each to complete "^ c0 ^™ the practice 

° ™rS«S^f DenSn .cce,sibU by .„,„) s.r.««. 

^^!fcot£ di KbV'=rffi»^S 

successful dissemination of knowledge. 

Places of Association and Recreation 

The students in this College as in other dental institutions 
throughout the country, come . fron i vanotu , walks f hfe^By 

£ roVinailiduallrltStion Chutes of all -eds and 

SliliSSglESill 

amusement, and in ( "'v»" "fctrain and grind of college 
ZStiSF&rS. nec^'amd" rlghtNhen proper* 

indulged in. 



College of Dentistry 223 

Eastern students can come here and gain an education at 
no greater expense than if they remained at home and at 
The Told ™ C T* aH ° f thea dvantages of the surroundings 
Ine rapid growth in population of this section opens manv 

THE BUILDING 

The new College Building was ready for occupancy at the 

SftTelom^mln" ^ 191 ^ 1915 - " -PrSsThe^con! 
themselves to ?L " Wh °i ^ ^ any years - have devoted 
tnemseives to the cause of denta education and who in 

consequence are thoroughly familiar w th the material 
requisites that should be possessed by T structar™ under 
whose roof every branch of dentistry is to be taught 

Sntrstr d vTt d emh eCted excl , u . siv . e 'y " an educational homf of 
dentistry, it embraces within its walls such modern facilities 
appliances and teaching accessories as it is belfeved are in- 
dispensable for the successful inculcation of the princip es 
ThetuZni he P ractce .°f .dentistry and dental surge y 
Ine building, classic in its simplicity, is composed of three 

a SmTnn?!: 116 and . baSe ^ nt fhe basem -? conta n 
til a of ' ock t ers >. m en 's retiring room, shower baths cafe 
tena and the heating plant. The ground floor contains 
aZ? T v 0m f °r r ? atients ' Examination room the BusSess 
room' Ee SenZ WrT* ^^g .room, Ladies' retiring 
torTknd^h^ en Op r er L a a tor; at0ry ' *' JUm ° r TeChni ^ e Labol " a 

thl^rte^g&Z' "?™ th u C Superintendent's office, 
tv,» v stu . de nts Retiring R 00m the Demonstrators Room 

0peSi C r a y ni2lng R °° m ' "* the ^^sion and OrSo&nS 

of T Hlto e ro°g n y a^'paTho/" 8 H "^ tHe La b°ratories 
Room Mo J t k Patnol °S/' Preparation Room, Lecture 
Koom No 4 Laboratory of Bacteriology, Dental Sureerv 

locke'retc ab0rat ° ry ' Men ' S Retirin ^ Room.^fsySel o y f 
th J h T C ^ third floor , cont ains Lecture Rooms Nos 1 and 2 
torv otp^ - 1 " 3 ; ° f Chemistry and Metallurgy the Laboral 
Eto°my Ph t y hTRfs y ea a r n c d h R^cT T^JT' .^fi-borato^f 
ture Room No. I ' Teachers Stu dy, and Lec- 

Operatory 

In planning this very important unit of the buildinc such 



224 University of Southern California 

fountain cuspidor, a revolving bracket, |^**2*Kg 
nection and surgical mst ™^ nt Jaw e. I g their nstru . 

of special design enable the stu den » *°. individual com- 

ments and appliances after **d} %££ n J A superintendent, 
partments. The Operatory > s / n m C d h e a r r |i s ° SU p e rvision, or that 
all operations being Performed ^p^^partment .of the 
of his several assistant^ The d ^ pe ns y ^ tions in 

Operatory supplies all materials neea presenta- 

the field of operative or p ro sthettc d ent« Ite* P J . 

tion of orders checked and ^ signed oy y & liber al sup- 

strators in charge. A free towel serv ft We 

ply of individual ase P^o f^e nlcessity of carrying out all 
impress upon the 8tud f°|.*5 v ne ciean surroundings. The 
operations .^ scnydoM ly cle an ^^ tlons 

Operatory faces the best ligntu east u 

should be Performed .namely north ^ ^ M t0 

rounded by broad h g * , wina ^ s times of the day. Instru- 
obtain all available light at all times . the opera 

ments are stored in a s .f fe™ anQ teautiful, and is equipped 
tive clinic. The room is large and beau ^ q{ ? g 

with every modern convenience x fa , and n o 

who apply here fo / s*™"* ac V ca l education will be neg- 
student need fear that his P™ ct £ a sib i e to select for 

lected. From this great clinic it i ip he may 

the student all.of the operations. many line ^^ addi . 

desire to 8P?«ah«,or where h ^feeU ^t . g Uted t0 

^eTnS rob^n P ; a wh C ile gown of the type- prescribed 
by the institution arranged in such a manner that 

JVtuKrcafwotwIthmtl? interruption from nine m 
Se mori^ng until five l * > the afternoon ^ we 

In charge of the work as D™" 8 ^; * rience and unques- 
have a number of ^ teachers of l°n| «pe~ of the per . 

tioned ability, the s ^ UQ i f"' ' f these competent men. . 
sonal contact and instruction of t. jese _co P is 

With , thC eX " P n7%tre"sno h e^ra y charge f& .the Sum- 
open the year round, there is reqmrem ent, it is advised 
mer Clinical Course. While not a^ q vacation period 
that the student spend as much time o dent i stry in the 
as he possibly can in the actual X a „tageous to the student. 
Operafory ^^'"f^'Su^lfi^th. of practical 
S& wTtS^y inte^uptTon from attending lectures. 

Senior Laboratory 

This laboratory is equipped with *« *^ | n gr t ^ d fi itfS 
ties necessary in order to P^form operaUo ns in ^ 

^^m^^^^^ M a11 pros ' 



College of Dentistry ' 225 

thetic instruments are kept and at which unit the clinical 
prosthetic substitutes are constructed. The unit consists of 
a work bench with a folding top enabling the student to lose 
no time in starting his work. Laboratory instruments and 
the piece under construction may be left just where they 
may be at closing time, bringing the folding top over and 
locking it being all that is necessary to insure finding them 
where left the next time work is undertaken. In addition a 
compartment at the side and under the bench serves as a 
handy repository for tjie heavier appliances. The room con- 
tains electric lathes, compressed air, soldering table and 
every other facility which should be included in a modernly 
equipped dental laboratory. 

Junior Laboratory 

. The Junior Laboratory adjoins the Senior Laboratory and 
is equipped with the same facilities as enumerated in the 
case of the Senior Laboratory. The progressive teaching of 
prosthetic dentistry renders it advisable that the laboratories 
in which the requirements of the Seniors and Juniors are 
made should be separate, for the purpose of securing the 
maximum of efficiency from both student and instructor. 

Freshman and Sophomore Technique Laboratory 

The Freshman and Sophomore Laboratory is located on 
the second floor and here- the student is trained in the funda- 
mentals of prosthetic dentistry as well as in such operations 
as tall within the scope of operative technics. The unit sys- 
tem of benches has been carried out in this laboratorv, as in 
the others thus permitting each student to fulfil the require- 
ments in these departments in an encironment which at once 
impresses him with the advantages to be derived from per- 
forming on a systematic basis the several steps of an oper- 
ation. During the hours which the student is required to de- 
vote to laboratory work, the chiefs of these laboratories, 
as well as their assistants, are invariably at hand to supervise 
the efforts of the student to duplicate the prosthetic appli- 
ances or operative technique manipulations as demonstrated 
+u A e u ? d ° f the department or his assistants. It is believed 
that the best teaching results are obtained by giving to the 

w^T th ^ bCnefit ° f u direCt advice from his teachfrs, and 
with this end in view the personnel of this department com- 
prises a sufficiently large number of instructors so that 
the student is at no time thrown at the mercy of his own 
resources. J 

X-Ray Laboratory 

The X-Ray Laboratory, which adjoins the operative clinic 

plays an important part in the diagnosis of obscure conditions 

i nthe teeth and jaws. Realizing that radiography is of 

utmost assistance in the diagnosis of pathological conditions, 



226 [/diversify of Southern California 

rational methods of diagnosis. 

Laboratory of Pathology and Histology 
The Laboratory of Pathology and, Histology is provided 

S-pes, projectoscopes and other necessary apparatus. 
Laboratory of Physiology 
This laboratory is equiped .with , . sufficient^ ff b«r of ««<* 

department and his assistants. 

Research Laboratory 

work of this laboratory. The diagnosis ° j in a 

disorders without the "Sistance of the laboratory 

baring upon the etiology of systemic disorders 
Dearmg u P laboratory has carried 

During *e session 1917-191^ his labo ay ^ ^ 

out an investigation of the P a ™° 10 § c t t gra nuloma). A 



College of Dentistry 227 

infections foci were minutely analyzed. The results of these 

"tTer wriM'nf r? - n °T- bdng PrCPared f ° r P^'icatlon An! 
other series of investigations centered in tne gingival tis- 

r£ r S a , so . urce of nfections of the peridental minbrane 

the conclusions so far reached will likewise be published 

in the immediate future. For teaching purposes the labora 

tory has prepared upwards of twenty?five hundred I si de 'of 

ro«S ° f ^ Ut th[ ft different dental a "d oral pathologic 
conditions. These slides are made available to students in 
the senior class in the laboratory course in dental pathology 
The laboratory also undertook, during the year an inv«- 
Thi, » °J 10mC medication ^d sterilization of root canals 
JhJM k - aS °? en u t0 members of the senior class under 
the supervision of those in charge of the laboratory. 

Laboratory of Materia Medica 

rrJJi% Lab ° rat 5 ry ° f Materia Medica is equipped with all 
the t e r, d a ? gS T* P"P arations thereof which are employed in 
he treatment of diseases of the mouth and teeth, and for 
the preparation of dentifrices. Here the student is made to 
Sl„ h T elf , Wi l h the P h ^ical, chemical and physio- 
logica properties of the medicinal agents used in dentistrv 

af m W of "tv T h ! hC meth0ds of dispensing them. It is the 
aim of this department to enable the student after graduation 
to employ intelligently every drug indicated in dental thera 
K t,C p S reSrn S haVing * dePend UP °" ^ -adetoS- 
Laboratory of Anatomy 
The Anatomic Laboratories are located in the third floor 
IIJJ* c °™P? sed oi two halls in which good lighting and 
ample ventilation are salient features. Dissecting material is 
fau^fl^ d tH? Freshm ? n a "d Junior student! ale here in 
taught anatomy ,n a practical way and by methods conducive 
to the maximum degree of efficiency. '"ucrve 

Extracting and Minor Surgery Room 

All extractions and such operations as fall within the scone 

fitted^, tn S ? r f fi e . ry arC P erf ? rmed in an operating room so 

o f sureerv InlT" 7 r ^TT tnt - ot the aseptic conception 

or surgery Instrument and dress ng sterilizers instrument 

tTesTo^htw CngineS ? nd a " -° ther instrumeS fS 
, m JZ , P erfo ™ance of operations in the field of minor 
surgery are contained in this unit of the building The 
surgical room is m charge of instructors and while "he more 
difficult operations are performed by them, the student is 
continuously encouraged to undertake individually under 
proper supervision, such operations as frequently confront 
r£„ P ,W Ctl l0ner I and , . whi ^ by virtue of his Pack of collegiate 
raining along this line, he is frequently compelled to refer 
to a specialist in these branches. ' 



228 University of Southern California 

THE LIBRARY 

It is the aim of the Faculty to encourage ^students t^ac- 
quire, in addition to the sc .bol^tic requirements as is con- 
c'urriculum, such information in amount and kind, ^_ 

ducive to a broadening of hl */X le "cessity of concentrat- 
ists only too often because^ of ^^^ M de fined and 
ing upon a branch of human enoea , ninca nce of 

palpably limited, are P ro f J^^^r to minimize their 
investigations in adjacent temtones or t t of dis . 

bearing upon the ftiology, pathology and ^^ pfac . 

eases under their immediate supervision^ ^ 

titioner who has been actively engaged I to P ind;fference 
in the work of his specialty and who by ^virt ^ ^ 
or disinclination has not . ke P*l^ e S s e s " r T a lizing at the present 
ature of his profession, is, doubtless, ^eai f * • hours 
time, to his heartfelt "gre^ the numb er op coUateral 
that might have been P^^^ffof affairs is traceable, to 
reading. This deplorable common oi atta t ^ 

some extent at least to the a bS enc Faculty encourages the 
of all habits— the study habit 1 he *acu y disposal 

development of the study habit Jy facing at ed H . 

of the student an attractive^ and ^g^ y and efe rence 
brary in which all the moflern dentistry are 

works bearing directly o ' ^directly P al d . 

gathered, as well as the eading dent£ a e tfae 

icals. By virtue of a s Pf "f v fu r^X rn works on dentistry 
latest editions of. practically all ^ modern w an 

and the allied sciences have k e / n *^ considerably enlarged 
the files of dental Journals have been con^ ^ Y 
by th addition of about one « u ™ • . j cha nnels 
Librarian assists the student by .^gmg n information in 

MUSEUM 

I. D. NOKES, Curator 

For several years past, specie- ^ Pathol ogic al cona- 
tions as well as of congenita \ malformations 
and jaws of the b'gher ^nd Jower verteb ^ 

made the subject of e ^^™ t ^e operative, surgical and 
the institution.. In addition trorv it ne P . g 

extracting clinics, excellent mus ^ nl ns m _ prope rly described 
stantly obtained. Jhese s^pecime n , v ^ of 

classified and P, ounted '7 p C r °r]e Dart ments of the curriculum, 
teaching material for severa ' oep ar tme »« . of andent 



College of Dentistry 229 

SPECIAL NOTICE 
Four- Years' Course 

Beginning with the session 1917-1918, in order to provide 
sufficient time in which to teach the subjects of a curriculum 
which under the three-year time limit of instruction appears 
over-crowded this institution will extend its course of in- 
struction to four scholastic years of thirty-two weeks each, 
itie adoption of the four years' course is the expression of 
the conviction that more time is needed in which to cover 
the group of subjects at present taught. The four years' 
course will take care of the dental curriculum so as to enable 
he graduate to leave the school in fair shape to cope with 
the problems of that dentistry which is representative of 
the latest investigations in the fields of prevention, etiology 
and treatment of dental disease, and in that of the relation- 
snip ot dental disease to systemic disturbances. 

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE OF STUDIES FOR THE 

FOUR- YEAR COURSE 

Freshman Year 

Biology, English (composition and rhetoric). Anatomy 
Lhemistry, Inorganic and Metallurgy, Histology, Physiology 
Phv S A T-° m Jz °P erative Technics, Prosthetic Technics.' 
Military Drill" Termln °l°gy, Technical Drawing and 

Sophomore Year 

1918-1919 

Anatomy, Chemistry, Organic and Physiologic, Physiology 
Rental Histology, Materia Medica, Bacteriology, Prosthetic 

SenerT'p^T and Brid S e T 5 ch ™s, Operate Technics! 
general Pathology, Comparative Anatomy and Military 

Junior Year 
1919-1920 



)S a rticInHr, 0} ° g , y ^ Mat ^ na T . Medica and Therapeutics, 
■il Pr«.?E f- C -^u 9P er £t>ve Dentistry, Didactic and Clin- 
-a Prosthetic Technics, Bacteriology, Orthodontia, Dental 
athology Oral Prophylaxis, Crown and Bridge Work 
radiography, Anesthesia, Physical Diagnosis and Military 



230 University of Southern California 

Senior Year 

1920-1921 

Dental Pathology, Materia Medica and ^Therapeutics D|- 
daSld^Clinicafoperative Dent stry Didactic an Chm- 

Military Drill. 

SCHEDULE OF STUDIES FOR JUNIOR AND SENIOR 

CLASHES DURING 1917-1918 AND 1918-1919 

RESPECTIVELY 

The Junior and Senior years' ^^^.^f^^^^fn 

lT&£st^ rrAS: j^S'tffk-. 

year course was in force. 

Junior Year 

ological Chemistry, lvietaiiuigjr Technic: General 

s?^«^s^^- ars£,£s5; 

istry, Operative Dentistry, bacteriology 

Dental Pathology. - , fi . serne ster, Feb- 

Anatomy. genior Ye „ 

ca, Surgery, General and oral E *' r,c Xf' D J ntsilry , De „ial 

^ru^^^^^ 

Children's Teeth, Ethics and Hygiene. 

Text-books 
Student, are advised to defer P^^^&'JSlj 

in the different departments. 



College of Dentistry 231 

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION 

Applicants for admission to the College of Dentistry must 
be at least seventeen years of age, mist give sat sfacTorv 
reference concerning their moral character, fnd must by °x 

?hTFicX°riv/. C M tificate8 *^ h Sha11 be -aStoJr to 
tne faculty give evidence of having completed a four war 

high school course in a school acceptable to the Faculty 
equivalent to fifteen units* as required for matriculation in 
SSifSSST ° f Llberal ArtS ° f the Univershfoi PsSS&S 

The fifteen units must be made up as follows- 

English 2 ' . 

Latin, French, German or'SpanisLZZ'^ units ' 
Laboratory Science (Botany, Zoology, 

Physiology Physics or Chemistry) 1 unit 

Algebra and Plane Geometry ' 2 un t, 

EleTtL?^ HiSt ° ry and Civi «^==l «nit 
^ . 7 units 

ProLlC'rH'Mon^ Sh ° Ul i SU > mit their credentials to 
th» r~n J ' r ; Montgomery, Registrar of the University at 
avenue If ?/ liberal Arts Thirty-fifth street and University 
Certificate o A H m; r , edentla ?f, t re - f ° Und to be satisfactory, a 

gars 5?ssr ^rr^sad s 

kA 6 !^'-?.? 6 I Any P erson oy er twenty-one vears of aee shall 
examfners 6 o°f ^-f" examination before the board of denta 
and upon m oav nTa\ UP ° n f makin ? application therefor 
n Iv,;!, A i payln S a f ee of twenty-five dollars- (2\ fur 

mshmg satisfactory testimonials of good moral characer 
IteA ( f ^ m furmshln g ^factory evidences of having gradu- 

hro T ugh t€ o r n™ ""hoor^ with „°ve ^ * P re P^° ry Sub ' ect "udied 
er week. y W th hve class exercises (or the equivalent) 



232 University) of Southern California 

diploma or certificate from an accredited high school, such 
applicant, after said date, may and with like effect furnish 
to said board of dental examiners a certificate from the 
board of dental examiners, or similar official body, of some 
other state in the United States, showing that such appli- 
cant has been a duly licensed practitioner of dentistry in 
such other state for a period of at least five years. 

These examinations will be conducted by the State Board 
of Education in August, each year. 

Foreign Students 
i 

Students from foreign countries desiring to matriculate 
in this college must possess a sufficient knowledge of the 
English language to enable them to understand the course 
of study and to prepare written work. The preliminary 
entrance requirements are the same as those demanded of 
graduates of accredited high schools. 

Admission to Advanced Grades on Certificates 

This College will receive into the advanced grades of 
Junior and Senior years, only such students as hold certifi- 
cates of having passed examinations in the studies of the 
Freshman or Junior years respectively, in a school which 
demands the same or higher preliminary educational re- 
quirements, and maintains the same curriculum; except that 
a student who presents satisfactory evidence of graduation 
from a reputable medical college, may be received into the 
Sophomore year, or may be given such advanced standing 
as his previous training may justify, provided he make up 
such subjects taught in the Freshman year in which he 
may be deficient. 

All students who have successfully passed their examina- 
tions for advanced standing and have complied with all the 
rules of the College of Dentistry shall have their certificates 
given or mailed to them within thirty days after such exam- 
inations shall have been completed, such certificates to be 
pledges to any college to which the holders may apply, that 
the requisite number of terms have been spent in the Col- 
lege of Dentistry, University of Southern California. 

Special Students 

Special students may be admitted on such entrance re- 
quirements as the Faculty may determine. 

They will be required to attend the courses they desire 
to pursue with the same regularity as the regular students 
and will pay the regular tuition fee; no diploma or certifi- 
cate will be issued at the close of such special study. 



College of Dentistry 233 

Applicants desiring to register as special students will be 
required to indicate what subjects they desire to pursue, and 
to present satisfactory credentials for matriculation in said 
subjects. 

Candidates for admission will not be permitted to matricu- 
late for any session other than that immediately succeeding 
the date of matriculation. 

This College reserves the right to refuse admission to any 
student or to terminate the attendance of any student, at 
any time for what may appear to the Faculty to be good 
and sufficient cause, as inefficiency, conduct unbecoming a 
gentleman or conduct not conducive to the morals of the 
class or institution; also to refuse a student the privilege 
of any special or final examination, for causes as above 
stated. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The candidate for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery 
must have attained the age of twenty-one years, and must 
be of good moral character. 

He shall have attended three full courses of lectures, of 
thirty-two weeks of six days each, exclusive of vacations, at 
some recognized and accredited dental school, the last 
course of which shall have been attended at this school, 
provided he matriculated as a dental student at a school ses- 
sion prior to that of 1917-1918. Beginning with the session 
of 1917-1918 he shall have attended four full courses of lec- 
tures, of thirty-two weeks of six days each, exclusive of va- 
cations, the last course of which shall have been attended 
at this college. 

He must complete all technic work prescribed throughout 
the course, perform all operations, treat all cases, 'insert 
the required number of artificial dentures, crowns and pieces 
of bridgework required in the respective departments. All 
this must be done in the College building, and exclusively 
by the applicant for the degree. He must have conformed 
to all the rules of the college and paid all fees. He must 
pass a satisfactory examination, oral, written, and practical, 
and if found^ necessary, must submit to any additional test 
that may assist an instructor in obtaining a correct measure 
of the candidate's fitness to engage in the practice of den- 
tistry. When these requirements have been complied with, 
he will be recommended by the Faculty of the College of 
Dentistry to the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Southern California for the defree of Doctor of Dental 
Surgery. 

The degree will not be conferred upon a student who is 
not present in person at the commencement exercises, un- 
less excused by the Dean, 



234 University of Southern California 

Rules Governing Examinations and Standing 
of Students 

The grades will be upon the scale of 100; the passing 
mark will be 75; attendance upon infirmary clinics, 80 per 
cent; lecture courses and laboratories, 80 per cent. 

Five Medals Are Computed For 

1 The Los Angeles County Dental Society Medal is 
awarded the Senior who has made the best average on 
?h?oretical work during the three years' College course 

2 The Cave Medal is awarded to the student making 
the best piece of Prosthetic Technic work. . 
the M ^ l Ford Medal is awarde d to the student making 

the best piece of Porcelain Technic work. . 

4 The Atwater Medal is awarded to the student making 
the best niece of Operative Technic work. 

5 The La Touch? Medal is awarded to the Senior student 
who attains the highest average in Clinical Operative Dent- 
istry throughout the year. 

THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 

A. C. LA TOUCHE, Professor 

WARREN D. GILL, Demonstrator 

A. W. LUFKIN, Demonstrator 

BEN L. REESE, Demonstrator 

C. PALMER BALLARD, Demonstrator 

H. P. PETERSON, Demonstrator 

A. C. PRATHER, Demonstrator 

The instruction in this department is given in the Junior 
and Senior years and embraces didactic and clinical teach- 
ines The system of instruction is so arranged that the stu- 
dent after entering into the work of the Senior year is already 
technically able t! carry out under qualified supem«on ad- 
vanced operations in the realm of operative dentistry, ltie 
Itudent^s trained in all the advanced methods of operative 
restorations which after years of tnal and experimentation 
have proven to be the most dependable and effic ent Lee 
tures are delivered to the Seniors and Juniors throughout 
th year by the head of the department and are supplemented 
by clinical demonstrations. The value of P™ ctlcal c ? r e ™°?- 
strations carrying out the teachings of the chair i 'Strongly 
emphasized in this department of the curriculum and consti- 
tutes the means of conveying to the student's mind the actual 
and detailed significance of the didactic teachings. The stu- 
dent after having completed the operative technical require- 
ments of the Junior and Freshman years is at the beginning 



College of Dentistry 235 

of the second semester permitted to undertake clinical work 
in the Operators provided that throughout the period of 
technical preparation he has displayed that degree of diligence 
and perseverance and obtained such results as in the judg- 
ment of his instructors constitute a justifiable warrant for 
advancement The histological survey of tissues of the 
tooth, from the standpoint of operative dentistry, is given 
a degree of prominence in harmony with the role which the 
subject plays in the preparation of cavities, upon a founda- 
tion which takes into consideration the restorative and 
prophylactic objects of operative procedures, particular stress 
being laid by the chair on the restoration of normal tooth 
contour— the imperative requisite in the maintenance of cor- 
rect relationship in the interproximal space. The course is 
graded as follows: 

Dental histology with reference to operative dentistry— 
the treatment of the enamel, dentine and cementum. Exam- 
ination of the teeth and soft tissues of the mouth. Instru- 
ments and appliances. Methods of excluding moisture The 
principles and echniques of cavity preparation for the various 
filling materials. Detailed study of the physical characteris- 
tics of filling materials. The operation of filling cavities with 
gold foil. The operation of filling cavities with gold inlays 
Porcelain inlays The plastics-amalgam, synthetic porce- 
lain, cement, and gutta-percha. The technique of filling root 
canals. Bleaching of teeth. Management of children's teeth. 
Books— Operative Dentistry, Black, Vols. I and II 
and American Text-Book of Operative Den- 
tistry, Kirk. Operative Dentistry, Davis. 

DEPARTMENT OF OPERATIVE TECHNICS 

A. C. LA TOUCHE, Professor 
J. T. PARKER, JR., Demonstrator 

J. O. STOCKER, Demonstrator 
H.i P. PETERSON, Demonstrator 

A. C. PRATHER, Demonstrator 
RAY BROWNSON, Demonstrator 

A. W. LUFKIN, Demonstrator 
H. G. ATWATER, Demonstrator 

KUVlfw" %^ k ^ this department one of the strongest 
Zu \ C u C - ge ; T1 ?e.object of this course is to afford a thor- 
ough technical training in operative procedures, preparatory 

ll\U T llT? W?rk !u thG ,°P eratoi T; to develop manipulative 
skill and to give the students an intimate knowledge of the 
tissues upon which they are to operate and of the physical 

s q ecnrl ie f/-iV d - apt \ tl0n ° f th r e .^terials to be used and to 
secure facility in the use of instruments by systematized 
practice upon extracted human teeth ysiemauzea 

Special attention will be given to the study of pulp cham- 
bers and root canals, their number, size and form, and thdr 



236 University of Southern California 

relation to the outer surfaces of the teeth. Sections of the 
natural teeth will be prepared by each student in such a man- 
ner that these features will be clearly shown. 

The student will construct model tooth forms of natural 
teeth, upon which operations will be performed as in actual 
practice. This will consist in the preparation of cavities and 
a study of their classification and forms; the study of enamel 
and the direction of cleavage on different parts of the crowns 
of the several teeth with special reference to the best form 
and finish of margins of cavities for filling; the cutting of 
dentine and the various methods employed in anchoring fill- 
ings; the removal of various tissue; the management of pits 
and fissures; and the general shaping of the cavity. Instruc- 
tion will also be given in the application of the rubber dam, 
the methods employed in gaining space, the use of clamps, 
wedges, separators, etc. In conjunction with practice in cav- 
ity preparation, there will be a study of filling materials and 
their manipulation. This course is designed to ground the 
student thoroughly in the principles of filling operations, 
and to prepare him to prosecute intelligently the practical 
work of the Operatory. 

Books — Operative Dentistry, Black, Vol. II. 

DEPARTMENT OF PROSTHETIC AND PROSTHETIC 
TECHNICS 

F. W. FRAHM, Professor 

E. LESLIE EAMES, Demonstrator 

FRANK G. STALEY, Demonstrator 

R. J. PACE, Demonstrator 

L. A. HELLER, Demonstrator 

H. A. WHIPPLE, Demonstrator 

Realizing that there is no branch of dentistry in which 
students are ordinarily so deficient as in the prosthetic de- 
partment, we have aimed to develop a practical working 
course to the end that our graduates may be able to do this 
class of work in a practical and artistic manner. 

From an artistic standpoint we teach the higher possibili- 
ties of the art of restoring the features of the face, together 
with the staining and grinding of the teeth to meet the con- 
ditions of the individual type of the patient. 

The fundamental principles of atmospheric pressure, lev- 
erage, etc., are dwelt upon, enabling the student intelligently 
to meet the conditions presented in difficult cases. Both 
technical and practical dentures of all kinds are made, such 
as vulcanite, celluloid, aluminum, Watts metal, weighing rub- \ 
ber, gold and porcelain continuous-gum. Both practical 
and technic interdental splints are made for fracture cases, \ 
as well as obturators and velumes for cleft palate cases. ! 



College of Dentistry 237 

Moreover, as a dentist may be called upon to restore loss 
ot tissue adjacent to the oral cavity, the course includes the 
making of celluloid ears and noses. 

The latest discoveries in the field of prosthesis affecting 
the construction of full and partial dentures are brought to 
the attention ot the student in order to guide him along 
channels of rationalism in prosthesis. Methods of impres- 
sion-taking with modeling composition, the articulation of 
teeth on an anatomic and physiological basis, the selection 
°* \ eeth tr ? m the standpoint of masticatory and artistic 
efficiency, the construction of removable partial dentures 
and bridges are prominent divisions in this department of 
instruction. The course is graded as follows- 

Impressions of the Mouth, Old and New Methods. Study 
ot the Physical Characteristics of Impression Materials. 
Plaster Casts. Metal dies and counter-dies. Occlusions. 
Articulation. Full Upper and Lower Dentures. Partial up- 
per and lower dentures. Plate Attachments. The Gysi Ar- 
ticulator. Principles underlying the vulcanizing of rubber 
Selection of Artificial Teeth. Metal Dentures. Pathologic 
conditions resulting from the wearing of defective crowns 
bridges, vulcanite and metal dentures. Facial prosthesis. ' 
Books— American Text-Book of Prosthetic Dentistry, 
Turner. Dental Prosthetics, Wilson. 

CLINICAL PROSTHESIS 

GEORGE H. WILSON, Special Professor 

A special course in clinical prosthesis is given yearly from 
January 15th to April 15th, under the direction of Dr. George 
H. Wilson. It comprises a series of lectures and clinical 
demonstrations on undergraduate work and on all such 
phases of dental prosthesis as are generally included in post- 
graduate work. The scientific principle underlying the con- 
struction of full and partial dentures and the study of the 
physical and chemical properties of the materials used are 
prominent teatures of the work. 

DEPARTMENT OF CROWN AND BRIDGE WORK 

F. W. FRAHM, Professor 

H. A. WHIPPLE, Demonstrator 

L. A. HELLER, Demonstrator 

Crown and bridge work pertains both to operative and 

filw I JhaTfJ ? en A 1S 1 t 1 ry ' \ nd y , et h ? c . cu P ies ^ch an important 
field that the College has deemed it wise to make it a sepa- 
rate department. F 

Students receive a complete course in Crown technique, 
as well as lectures, during their Freshman year. Juniors re- 
ceive a complete course in bridge technique during the first 



238 University of Southern California 

semester and do practical work in the Operator, ^during the 

S^^^P^S* oTcrtSrlf^l the 

SSHs! sraayiss mtsmlm 

or should not be used. 

Hours— Crown and Bridge, Freshman 

„ . • 192 hrs. 

Technic ........ .- Q6 . 

Junior Technic - *S **•' 

Lecture work, Freshman « nrs. 

Lecture work, Juniors ^ nrs. 

Lecture work, Seniors - yo nrb - 

DEPARTMENT OF CERAMIC ART 

H. C.^ KING, Demonstrator 
CLARENCE E. WORTH, Demonstrator 

Porcelain is attracting more and more attention It is the 

Says I which so accurately imitate nature as to be unde- 

n\tLts oMhS^hoof-will be expected to attain a high 
degree o proficiency in the manipulation of porcelain The 

colons A complete course of lectures is given covering the 

^O^SS is afforded the Seniors and Juniors for mak- 
ing a technical continuous gum case. 

DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL MATERIA MEDICA 

JULIO ENDELMAN, Professor 
A. W. LUFKIN, Lecturer 

Thp work for the Junior class consists in a study of defini- 

siiiiSiiliii 

mMmmm 



College of Dentistry 239 

In the Senior year the work of the Junior year is carefully 
reviewed ma systematic way, and thereafter a special course 
lZT eS M gIVen , rela - ting t0 the latest ^d best approved 
Sn* l n . 6 - a PP llca i. IC ! n of medicines to the treatment of 
£ X P £ h ?- l0 * glC ^ co , ndltions of more tha » ^«al signficance 
tic year "^ * WCek th roughout the^cholas- 

Books-Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 

DEPARTMENT OF PYORRHEA ALVEOLARIS AND 
ORAL PROPHYLAXIS 

r MA .£™?, LL M - DIX °N, Demonstrator 
D. ARTHUR JOHNSTON, Demonstrator 

J. T. LOUGHAN, Demonstrator 

THOMAS LYNCH, Demonstrator 

H;=?! aI P r °P h y laxis . as well as the treatment of the group of 

diseases generally designated as pyorrhea areolaris is from 

l cinlca standpoint, the subject of attention in a specif 

department. Seniors and Juniors are required to devote one 

tal-Therapeudcf 'r^ff 7 V^ ^A^t pha* ofYen! 
idi rnerapeutics. lhis department is presided over hv 
specialists in these branches and affords the student an or, 
portun.ty to familiarize himself in detail with the technique" 
of the operations in the fields of oral prophylaxis and 
Eril" alv . e ° lari . s ' The c ourse embraces thedfdSc and 

Zsiu^nltZTV* th f- f0ll ° f wing Phases of the w a r n k d 
n ri!lfc m r • C ? rrec tion of conditions which act as 
predisposing factors of diseases of the hard and soft tissues 
of the tooth and of its supporting structures Clinical ron 

an d d e roo°ts S'&X™?" ° f ^ depcit^upon S^wns - 
sues nl„« f ' t , Con ?eryation of contour and septal tis- 
he pyorrhea tvne ^u^ 1 ™ and peridental membrane of 
Jshiri/nf t««^ P -i surgical removal of deposits. Pol- 

«* t?if t00 * h , and root surfaces. Treatment of the Wth 
of children with the end in view of preventing the onset S 

furtleT 63 - Sp " nting ° f teeth the ^ of PeridenTafdis! 
DEPARTMENT OF DENTAL ANATOMY 

A. C. LA TOUCHE, Professor 
J. T. PARKER, JR., Lecturer and Demonstrator 

The student takes up the study of nomenclature followed 

^he teeth 'and tiTl" *?* a , n \ toln * the arrSem enTof 

into this course. Lantern slides in Iar|enuZers are used 
to facilitate the study of this importanf branch of the cur? 



240 U.nherm of Southern California 

upon the screen. 

Books-Dental Anatomy, BUck-DenUK Anatomy 
and Histology, Broomell and tiscnelis. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORAL SURGERY 

CHAS. D. LOCKWOOD, f ° fessor 
n D THORNTON, Assistant Professor 
C F THOLEN, Assistant Professor 
' r. E. LANE, Dental Surgeon 

This course will consist of: 

1. Didactic Lectures by Prof. Lo<*wooA 

2. Text-book quizzes by Tvot Thornton^ prof 

3. Clinics at the L% An | e ^ ^fS and Straub. 
Lockwood, assisted by Dr. 1 nolens nractica l a s 

• Oral <Mirtrerv will be made as practical as 
The course in Oral Surgery™ n diagnosis. The 

possible, special attentior , em g give* t K ^ m , 

Los Angeles County Hasp tel turms and wgekly 

to demonstrate all surgical 1««°™ * * AMi8t » t Professor 
? h n oTen Ind aSta^roti October 1 to May 1. 

Books-Surgery and Diseases of Mouth and Jaws, 
Blair— also McCurdy. 
DEPARTMENT OF ORTHODONTIA 

TAMES D. McCOY, Professor 
JOHN R. McCOY, Assistant Professor 

Course I. Junior ^ « /'—^ 
slides, demonstrations and tephmque y given to 

Orhtodontia are taught, s P ec ^ f ^ich maintain it. The 
normal occlusion and those factors « thoroughly dis- 
etiology of malocclusion m l* s P na sis and prehm . 

tain pieces of technique work. Hours ii. 

Course II. Senior Year. J^*™^^^ 

slides, demonstrations and clinical ins^ructi^ ^ . ples 

the Junior year is very briefly revie means e 

of treatment, continued. The various ^^ and 

ployed in the. correction of maloc clusw demon _ 

facial deformities, are * o ; ou ^ly expla ion as 
strated. The procedures necessary 



College of Dentistry 241 

well as treatment of all phases of malocclusion are cov- 
ered in detail. Clinical orthodontia will enable the student 
to familiarize himself in a practical" way with the methods 
and procedures taught didactically and to acquire a work- 
ing foundation in this specialized branch of dentistry. 

Books— Malocclusion of the Teeth, Angle, Practical 
Orthodontia, Dewey. 



DEPARTMENT OF RADIOGRAPHY 

JAMES < D. McCOY, Professor 
C. PALMER BALLARD, Demonstrator' 

Course I. Junior Year. In a series of illustrated lectures 
the principles of the X-ray are thoroughly explained, includ- 
ing its history, the means employed in its production. Mod- 
ern X-ray apparatus and the rules governing its manipula- 
tion are explained. Its application to dentistry and the tech- 
nique of dental and oral radiography are brought out in 
detail. 

Course II. Senior Year. In the X-ray room which is 
equipped with all the necesary modern X-ray apparatus prac- 
tical cases from the Operatory are subjected to X-ray exam- 
ination. Radiographs of the teeth and associated struc- 
tures are made whenever indicated. In this way the student 
becomes familiar with the practical as well as the theoreti- 
cal side of this important subject. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE DENTAL 
ANATOMY 

I. D. NOKES, Lecturer 

This course involves a comparison of the teeth of man and 
those of the lower orders of animal life. Evolution, with 
the part that variation plays in determining the character 
of a given organ, is studied. The studdents prepare speci- 
mens under the guidance of the teacher. The course is 
made more interesting and instructive by the large collec- 
tion of specimens and the complete line of lantern slides 
that are used for illustrating the lectures. 

The course is strengthened and enlarged by the complete 
equipment and facilities that the new building affords. 



242 University of Southern California 

ANESTHESIA: GENERAL AND LOCAL 

JULIO ENDELMAN, Professor 

ROY L. SPENCER, Lecturer 

FRANK L. PLATT, Special Lecturer and Clinician 

BERT E. NALL, Demonstrator 

The wonderful development in the field of anaesthesia, 
which has been brought about in the past three years 
through the efforts of investigators in the medical and 
dental professions, constitutes the reason for the estab- 
lishment of a department exclusively devoted to the study 
and practice of all methods of inducing general and local 
insensibility to pain. Infiltration anesthesia, conductive 
anesthesia, intra-osseous anesthesia, nitrous oxid-oxygen 
anesthesia, etc., are some of the methods with which the 
student is made to familiarize himself, invariably under the 
immediate supervision of a member of the staff. 

Book — Local Anesthesia in Dentistry — Fisher and 
Riethmuller. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

WILLIAM R. MOLONY, Professor 

WAYNE P. HANSON, Associate Professor 

HOWARD L. MOFFATT, Demonstrator 

M. P. VARIAN, Prosector 

Anatomy I. First Year. Lectures, recitations and dem- 
onstrations three times a week during the entire year. The 
anatomy of the entire body, excepting that of the head and 
neck is covered during the year. The work is complete, 
exacting and comprehensive, to the end that the student 
be thoroughly grounded in anatomy. 

Anatomy II. Second Year. Lectures, recitations and 
demonstrations three times a week during the entire year. 
The anatomy of the head and neck and the brain is studied 
during this year and as the anatomy of these parts is of 
especial importance and interest to the dental surgeon, the 
student will be held to more than ordinary high requirements. 

Anatomy III. and IV. First Year. Dissection of the en- 
tire upper or lower half of the body. 

Second Year. Dissection of the head and neck. This work 
is carried on in a well-lighted and well-appointed laboratory 
under the constant supervision of demonstrators and a de- 
tailed dissection is required of each student. 



College of Dentistry 243 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

J. WALTER REEVES, Professor 

W. D. JUDGE, Assistant 

J. O. STOCKER, Assistant 

The courses in Physiology are given in the Sophomore 
and Junior years. The work consists of lectures, recitations 
and demonstrations; for the latter purpose a complete physi- 
ological laboratory is available. y 

The subject of cells, tissues, blood, and the circulatory 
tT^^ firS / i aket ?. u P' and later the course is devoted 
to the study of the alimentary canal, excretory organs the 
nervous system, the organs of special sense, and the organs 
ot reproduction. B a 

in B t£ r t n r«| n Vi fV!l? faCt t - hat the dentist is a specialist 
wh,Vtf ^ eatment - of dlsea ses in an area of the human body 
which Plays so important a part in the maintenance of the 

fnS S A Cal T h ' - the C ° Ur - e is so graded as to result at he 
end of the Junior year in the acquirement by the stuHent 
of a complete understanding of the functional and nerve 
mechanisms of all the tissues and organs of the body The 
strictest, attention to the individual requirements of the 
student is in this, as in other departments of the curriculum? 
assistants param0Unt ln the efforts ° f the professor ar?d 

thl°fi *K Pa/Pose of conducting quizzes/oral and written 

Iht «t l? - dlVld ? d m - t0 Sections ' each section bei "g «" d er 
the supervision of assistants. This plan likewise applies to 

It W? 1 WOr - k m - the laborator y d evoted to the purpose 
the students performing experimental work under the direct 
supervision of demonstrators. uirecr 

Course I Freshman Class. Cells, Tissues, Circulation- 
Study of the circulating fluids in details. Heart and Blood 
Vessels-Lymphatic structures and channels. Respiration- 
anatomic and physiologic survey of the organic structures 
nerve mechanisms and interchange of gases in respiration 

Course II. Junior Class. Digestion— Detailed study of the 
c a r nT, en % ^ V he £ ands associated with the alimentary 
P,L, f K ei0 ^ Kld . n J eyS ,: Skin ' etc - Inte ™al Secretion- 
N.rvnf.^ °. dy ' th ^ yr01 ^ th ^ m - US ' s P leen and adrenal body. 
Nervous System-Cerebro-Spinal axis, spinal, sympathetic 

et^ Te^oducTot etT^ S — %H hearing! «Jg 

Books— Pearce and McLeod, Physiology for Dental 
students. Brubaker's Physiology. Hall's 
Physiology. 



244 University of Southern California 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

A. F. WAGNER, Professor 
L. E. GILSON, Assistant 
R. W. GILSON, Assistant 

1. General Chemistry. The general principles of inor- 
ganic chemistry are reviewed. Those who do not have credits 
in high-school chemistry, or who are weak in this subject, are 
given special attention during first twelve weeks. Special 
stress is laid on physical chemistry so that the student may 
correctly interpret the modern ideas of matter and the prop- 
erties of matter. Then the study of the elements and their 
compounds is taken up; first the non-metals, most of them 
being prepared in the laboratory. In the study of the metals 
the application of the principles of chemistry and metallurgy 
to the dental profession is continually borne in mind. De- 
tailed consideration is g^en to nitrous oxid, hydrogen perox- 
ide and the peroxides • of the alkalies and akaline earths, 
silica and silicates, porcelain and glass, the acids of phos- 
phorous, the chemistry of the powders of oxyphosphate ce- 
ments and of photography. 

2. Metallurgy. In this course those metals are considered 
that are of importance to the dentist. These are studied with 
reference to their physical and chemical properties; their sep- 
aration and refining and their identification. Alloys, amalgam 
alloys, solders, cements; etc., are prepared in the laboratory. 

3. Qualitative Analysis. The fundamentals of analytical 
methods, chemical and physical equilibrium, theories of solu- 
tion and ionization. Some applications of physical and elec- 
tro-chemistry to qualitative and quantitative analysis. The 
advantages and simplicity of dry methods in certain cases are 
studied in detail. The student is given unknown alloys and 
solutions. In these he is required to determine both metal 
and acid radical. 

4. Electro-Analysis. This course is given as a part of the 
general chemistry course. 

5. Sanitary Water Analysis. A study of the impurities in 
drinking water, their significance, limits of permissibility and 
method for ther determination. 

6. Mineralogy. Descriptive and determinative course. The 
most important ores of elements used in dentistry are studied. 

7. Toxicology. The physiological and toxicological action 
and the antidotes for the common non-metallic poisons such 
as yellow phosphorous, the mineral acids and caustic alkalies, 
the metallic poisons, the volatile organic and alkaloid poisons. 
The application of tests for these substances in body secre- 
tions and post mortem material. 



College of Dentistry 245 

8. Organic Chemistry. Ultimate and proximate analysis 
otorgamc compounds in lecture and demonstration. A theo- 
retical study of the aliphatic, carbocylic and heterocyclic com- 
pounds and the course is finished by the student preparing 

lull « g ?i? ,C C f ° mpounds * ^y ^y use in his profess on 
—such as chloroform, aristol, iodoform, ethyl bromide, etc. 

a nH P h y siolo | ical Chemistry. The chemistry of the mouth 
and sahviary digestion in detail. Also chemistry of gastric 
and intestinal digestion, urinalysis, chemical co/sthuents of 
the body in general and their action in metabolism. 

10. Original Investigation. Students wishing to do work 
along special lines are encouraged to do so if they have Iffi- 

11. Chemical Review. During the Senior year there will 
be given a review of the courses of the previous years Re 
view lectures, demonstrations, oral and written qufzzes 

Courses, Nos. 1, 3, and 4 are given in the Freshman year. 

Courses 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, are given in the Junior year. 

Course 11 is given in the Senior year. 

Text-Book— Manual of Chemistry, Simon. 

Reference— Inorganic Chemistry, Smith. 

DEPARTMENT OF DENTAL PATHOLOGY 

JULIO ENDELMAN, Professor 
A. W. LUFKIN, Assistant 

The instruction in this branch will consist of one lecture 
weekly to the Junior; and two lectures weekly to the Senior 

i^tZf'^ T* 1 ?? StUd - y - ° f a11 P^hological conditions of 
interest to the dental practitioner, together with a general ap- 

o P J 1C t a h t e 1 s e n c°on t d 1 ]t e io t n h s eraPeUtIC ?«*> indicated * ^ "treatment 

*hJ h A- didactic wo . r k is supplemented by clinical work, under 
Everv r Hf'? er 7 S1 ° n °J the P^iessor and his ass stents! 
Every deviation from the normal, functional or organic is 

sill iitn P erVed T d the f student is mad e to familiarfze him- 
self with every phase of oral and dental pathology. He is 
daily confronted with problems in dental pathology which he 
is made to study individually, the results of his observation! 

nn , a 1 g rrV rp ' tted ^ th ° S J e in Charge ° f this department fSr 
final criticism. The study of disease processes and of ra- 



246 University of Southern California 

divided attention of the chatr courie 

oi disease jener,! and loo^ >$XgT»« <,„,„ and it. 

causes). Disorders 01 i u , . d hypo-nutrition), lne 

contained organs (hyper -n^ntton and^ Mal{ 
hyperacid diathesis— -me uyy inflammation in general. De- 
of the hard and so t palate ^J™^ ja S ws . Osteitis 
generations »»* mfflt«tto«. D^se^o^ J g 

(proliferating and rarel ^ ir !°{: rriC .> ot) i c anatomy of the hard 
Pyemia. Macroscopic an ^ microspop« anato y tation . 

arid soft tissues of the tooth Chemistry q{ ^ 

Dental caries. Developmental defects ana identa i 

enamel, dentine and "fentum Diseases p c 

mmbrane. Pyorrhea alveolans Pencemen Animal 

istry of the decomposition of ^trogeno ^ ^ ^ 
alkaloids. D«ease of the : pulp. JJ ma lignant and 

process. Diseases of the gums, in p Disea ses of 

benign. Diseases of the ^^ sinus Systematic 

the tongue. Diseases 01 u diseases) traceable to 

intoxication (organic and functional d^se ; 
foci of injection in the tee* and M of local d s 

Buccal tuberculosis. Diagnostic g and u of the 

^.ftffS&TE! general intoxication, 
Books _Pa*ology of the HardJiss^oMhe Teeth, 

• ?he American Text-Book of Operative Den- 
tistry, Kirk. 
DEPARTMENT OF CLINICAL DENTISTRY 
LEWIS E. FORD, Professor 

i '% S w H a A a R s P J- ™ montfort 

f WS u°v K I £|gS5 

D L. ENGLAND A. B. ALLEN 

N. F. HIRTZ 

The department ^f^^^^^e^^ 

fnd tSe^^^ SX 

cedures. At intervals of a week the t ^^ 

have in readiness for operative or p tmen t. The 

^lentrsTe^freTto Sve^practfcal demonstrations of his 



College of Dentistry 247 

SJ^&^^irSSfe ^-Perations indicated, 
the student of th 'tStosrflh?^ 8 ' mi ? conce Ptions by 
necessity and duty oMeavfno-™ ♦ cor rectly appreciate the 

impart to the students L Iw y <? f . special instructors 

of operative Ld^oXtic pro^Xre. ' ^^ meth ° ds 

DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL PATHOLOGY 

J. WALTER REEVES, Professor 
J. O. STOCKER, Assistant 

JS S th C r ou r g S hou t f tSjuniorylaf %T " • de T nStrationS is 
Pathology are thorouX J»%»A The .P nnc ,! p,es of General 

Healt'^Difeas'e 6 Serl 1 ? ?'' S de P art . ment is as fo »— 
of Disease. SsTurban'c To SSaLT" W the E * iol °^ 

^TsrH^ h tes7nI h » 

Srop^r^^^^ 

diseases. Tuberculosis SvohiH, a!-! Chronic infectious 
Leprosy. Parasitic diwasM B1™£ tyno ™ yco - s,s - Glanders, 
sites. diseases— Blood parasites, intestinal para- 

Book-Fundamentals of Pathology, Woolley 

DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL AND DENTAL 
HISTOLOGY 

A. C. LA TOUCHE, Professor 

suW h ect fi o7 t Ge e n rn era{ e ki stolo e ,v Fr ^ hma S year h ^ ive " to *he 
and two hours Lc u ?ewnrtf y ' F °, m h ° UrS ! abor atory work 
the course The eleme.Ttarv M.? e i ek are , required to complete 



248 University of Southern California 

oi the teeth are. used in this course each student making 
drawings of typical Phases of toot h « V ^ ^ hard 

ass z&£Asspr*£'* i * *• -r 

ture of bone, enamel ?»» den, '"J' e „„ipped with Bausch & 

j m h b saga. , ss£s+&£*- » d ° ,h " n - 

essary apparatus. Histology Tomes 

Books-Shafe^ Essentials ^ ye f ^Histology. 

DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY 

A. F. WAGNER, Professor 
H. F. HAWKINS, Assistant 

Bacteriology is .«»*• ->« *« I"^^^^' »£ 
SI ftatSffSLSiS "«S S N**- o. each *»- 
dent - Lectures 

Two hours each week is given to the g^f^. L ffi 
and outline work from .the .^1 placed on the studies in 
this course especial emphasis is p met hods of classi- 

immunity, the place oi ^ bacteria in nam ^.^ patho . 

fication of bacteria and a detaded study ^ 

ilSSS'"?"^^ *■*■ ,he lec,ure 

periods. Laboratory Courses 

I Elementary technical work is ^given to 20 student^ three 
times each week for a period o "ght week s V Qf 

of media preparation, ffr^zation met hod ^ 

organisms of the air i given d u^ micro scope, the 

student is furmsh f ed r Xnre media, and every necessary ap- 
different forms of. culture meaia ^ isolating C ulti- 

pliance to follow in detail the ^ teen q athoge mc and 

vating and staining P^.^f^igned for study, 
pathogenic bacteria which are assign ^ fe s 

During the last week of ! th ^ourse bacteria a nd is 

a Advanced .echnic.l ™ V?ffife1» ^ C« 



College of Dentistry 249 

the Operatory are made. The technique of the manufacture 
pt vaccines including their standardization and sterilization 
is given to these students. 

III. Research work is provided for in this department so 
that any student in either the Junior or Senior class who has 
shown himself proficient in the courses detailed above may 
be provided with a laboratory outfit and continue his work 
under the supervision of the professor and assistants. 

It is the aim of this department to increase the scope of 
bacteriology in destistry and to prepare each student who 
leaves the institution to continue bacteriological work in con- 
junction with his own practice. 

Text-Books 

Principles of Bacteriology, Abbot. 

General Bacteriology, Jordan. 

Text-book of Bacteriology, Hiss & Zinsser. 

Infection, Immunity and Serum Therapy, Ricketts. 

DEPARTMENT OF RHINOLOGY AND 
LARYNOLOGY 

JOHN McKENZIE BROWN, M.D., Lecturer 

The course in Rhinology and Laryngology consists in lec- 
tures and demonstrations on the anatomy, physiology and 
pathology of the nose and throat, and the diagnosis and 
treatment of the commoner diseases of these organs and their 
special relationship to dental surgery, and in particular to 
orthodontia. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS 

J. WALTER REEVES, Professor 

The object of this department is to familiarize the student 
with such diagnostic procedures as are indispensable to an 
appreciation of the health status of his patients, especially 
in so tar as the administration of anesthetics is concerned 
or the undertaking of protracted operations in individuals 
with tunctional or organic lesions of the viscera. The course 
comprises lecture room work and clinics at the Los Angeles 
County Hospital, the patients in the medical wards being 
accessible to the department of instruction, under the im- 
mediate supervision of Professor Reeves. 

Hours 1^ 

Book— Slade's Physical Diagnosis. 



250 University of Southern California 

DEPARTMENT OF ETHICS AND HYGIENE 

GARRETT NEWKIRK, Professor 
BERT BOYD, Lecturer 

Ethics 

1. General principles; brief history. 

2. In relation to one's clients and to civic life. Idea ot 

service. 

Hygiene 

1 Definition, general principles, history. 

2 Application-to the dentist himself:. Laws of diet, ex- 
ercise, cleanliness, sleep and rest, mental influence, etc 

3 Hygiene as related to dental office and equipment. 

4. Oral hygiene, especially as related to the young in 
family or school. 

DEPARTMENT OF EXTRACTION AND 
ANESTHETICS 

BERT E. NALL, Clinical Instructor 
Thi« course embraces a series of lectures upon the prin- 

wmmmmm 

Lurse of fourteln lectures covers the following subjects: 
Preoaration and technique of administration oi-localznd 

models. Management of extracting patients. The value of 
suggestive therapeutics. 

SCHEDULE OF FEES 
Fees are payable in two equal installments-October 1st 
a to F st r d U e a nfs wiil be admitted for less than the stated fees. 

Freshman Year $ 5 00 

Matriculation fee 170.00 

Lecture ticket -- -.-; 5.00 

Chemical laboratory deposit ...: x ^ 

Anatomical specimens, rental tee — ;_ 

$181.00 



College of Dentistry 251 

Sophomore Year 

Matriculation fee $ 5 qq 

Lecture ticket ZZZ.Z.Z...Z... Z.. 17000 

Chemical Laboratory deposit ".."" Z. 5 00 

Anatomical specimens, rental fee ...™!........ 100 



Junior Year 



$181.00 



Matriculation fee * cnn 

Lecture ticket ZZZZZ!Z;ZL" 17000 

Chemical Laboratory deposit "ZZ 5 00 

Anatomical specimens, rental fee ".............".. 100 

Senior Year * 18L0 ° 

Matriculation fee $ $qq 

: ." 170.00 



Lecture ticket 



ti, t • 1 , $175.00 

ihese fees include dissecting and all other laboratory fees. 

Cost of Books and Instruments 

Before beginning his work, each student must possess all 
the required instruments. 

uaHnn b0< ^ S and i n /truments employed are needed after grad- 

student £ V™ ^^ * d , ental engine > and enable * the 
mucrLd^nn/l practlc % on . finishing his course, without 
much additional expense for instruments. A list of the in- 
struments is furnished the student on his arrival The ap- 
proximate cost is as follows: P 

Freshman year «icaaa 

Sophomore year H" ^ffi 

Junior year " ™ 

Senior year l ™-™ 

c , j Zo.UU 

until^fw arC £ ot . adm j" ed to class work and the Operatory 
until after purchasing the required books and instruments 

thS U have S me r t th*™^ l ° defe J P urchasin S text-books until 
classroom »n h! I™ 3 P rofess ,°" and instructors in the 

S^i»^S£X dep'ar^enff""^ " t0 L b °° ks 
Military Training 

ric 1 u I lum ar for tr a n in i! lg iS a C T P - Uls0ry re ^i>-ement of the cur- 
otn in men ' Zt !?, the aim of this institution to 

thorfties fn th? y way P os ? lbIe , with national and state au- 
thorities in the work of national defense and efficiency and 
simultaneously to take care of the health and physiea" devel 



252 University of Southern California 

opment of the student. The benefit s to be derW from sys- 
tematically planned physical e"" 1 " 8 £ er f the National 
t^JBffSS^ffSSb in^he IfanisUmerican war 
i1?n charge of the three companies of classmen. 
Omicron Kappa Upsilon 
As an encouragement to high £■ scholastic end.™ on the 
part of dental students, a chapter °* ©micron Ka p p P 
honorary fraternity has re « Senior c^s a number of stu- 
be annually elected from the Senior class a es 

dents, not exceeding 12 per cent of thecas ™ ors of the 
character requisites according to the official 
institution, rank highest in ^^/^ of 1917 are the first 
The following graduates of t * e r X ff S e ° h ey having ranked 
recipients of .the honor from .this college j^y g { 

^St^J'G '/^""^^.^,™;^: Atthu, G. 

Cook, Ernest J. Hawke. 

Fraternities 

I„ addition .0 .his recently <f°^£^&"S. 
^e^t'S^WS f sS-S *e gjji An 

gs5ra f iSwfS& &•&*% «• *«* M - 

sonic Fraternity. 

Additional Items of Information 

Blank forms of application for admission will be sent by 

the AlMees U d P u e n ^College are payable to the Treasurer at 

^Thfmarficuratfonle^-must be paid before the name of a 

St The n re till be noTeJurn of fees by reason of suspension or 

expulsion. n uv, v( .A to withdraw from the College 

When the student is obW«» misdemeanors, 

before the last four weeks of a session tor d in all 

but for good and sufficient reason to oe * f three . 

student's withdrawal from the College. 



College of Dentistry) 253 

A student may be called upon at any time to satisfy an in- 
structor that he is pursuing the work of his department sat- 
isfactorily, in such a way as the instructor may determine. 

Late arrivals at an examination debars a student from the 
privilege of taking it. A special examination may be given 
upon payment of a fee of $5.00. 

Graduate dentists are admitted to the Operatory as special 
students for a smaller than the regular fee when not candi- 
dates for the degree. 

Students can live in Los Angeles as in other large cities 
according to his means or his habits of life. Good room and 
board near the college may be had for $30.00 per month 

Laboratory benches and operating chairs are assigned to 
students in the order of matriculation, and each student is 
required to employ the same throughout the session, but this 
privilege's forfeited if the student is not in attendance at 
:ne opening of the session. 

Students will not be admitted to class work or the Opera- 
:ory until after purchasing required books and instruments 
Operations in the technique departments of the school re- 
hire a large number of natural teeth and a sufficient supply 
8 sometimes difficult to procure. Students will therefore 
hey can°oDtain advantage to brin ^ a11 the extracted teeth 
Alumni and friends of the College are requested to donate 
s many extracted teeth as possible. The College will be 

Irhlr rL S aV u rS and Wil1 gladly pay a11 ex P re ss or 

•tner charges on such packages. 

Address all communications to the 

COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 

University of Southern California 
Lewis E. Ford, D.D.S., Dean 

Los Angeles St. at Sixteenth, Los Angeles, California 



THE COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY 

HISTORICAL 

The Southern California Annual Conference of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, at its first session in 1876 gave ^earn 

it as the "Los Angeles Academy. . T T«!,«.r 

Tn 1879 the Conference decided to organize theUmver- 

he cornerstone of the first University ^ng ( n°w occu 
pied by the department of Civ. ^«nn« ) »^gber 
the doors were opened to students in 

^rS'nfclmittee on ^^£$2»*Z& 
nual conference a resolution "commending Our Theology 
Schools at Boston, Madison and Evanston, and hoping i 
"the dav may not be far distant when we can add this depart 

feet in dimensions, and a camp., of ten seres, as the e,o.p 
men, of the "Macl.y College of Thnok^ ^ 

Tt«s first Dean was the Reverend K. W. ^\ ra " 1 r v 1 
take! foTth 1 ?; place from the Presiding ™^ n %^£ 
Angeles District The = appo-tment . oi : th ^^lldge, 
?M n rp^d^lnla; h FacX and tL College opened. 
S n M t he C °dea P th of ?« FJ-^^^^STS^'SlE 

period the new School of Theology did excellent work, com- 



College of Theology 255 

ing about the time of the succession of Dr. Cochran from its 
home in San Fernando to the immediate neighborhood of 
the College of Liberal Arts in Los Angeles 

In the hard times of 1893 the Trustees thought it expedient 
to close the Maclay College until its resources should war- 
rant the continuance of its work. 

t hl n T 9 °l' ° n t * he u UI ? T e ° t reQUeSt " ° f the Annual Conference, 
the Trustees of the University decided to reopen the School 
of Theology, and upon request of the Board, Ezra A. Healy 
L TT ' Just f C0 ™P leti "g "is seventh year in the pastorate of 
the University Church, was assigned to the task of reor- 
gan.zmg Maclay College and was appointed Dean. The first 
class under the new regime was graduated in 1911. 

ADMISSION 

Graduation from an accredited High School is a prerequi- 
site for enrollment as a regular student 

The Diploma of the College will be granted to those only 
L?beri a Arts° ^ ***** ° f under S raduat e work in 

The Degree in Theology will be conferred on those onlv 
who have obtained the Bachelor's Degree in Libera? Art, 

CREDENTIALS 

I Ea . ch a P? Hcant ™ ust Present from his pastor or the official 
board of his church, a certificate of moral and religious chaJ- 

e Go a ,ni an - ,? ? Cated fi l nCSS t0 Study in reparation for 
the Gospel ministry or other religious work. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

It is the aim of the College of Theology to do all that is 
possible to furnish the churches of our constituencv with 
preachers who shall be at once scholarly and "vangeS Tna 
»stors who shall be apt and successful in their Sit work 
^s will be seen by reference to the accompanying table un^ 
iTfh V T thC AnnUal Conf erence find here Vat nearly 
aken i„'tt T^,? " * e Conf -ence Courses may be 
.a, ?hl r g ," " C ° Uege daSSes - T he student, therefore 

rep tjoToi tT'T ° f f UbstitUti ^ d "ll, qu ' estion) ^ 
'reparation of papers for solitary reading 



256 University of Southern California 

course will entitle the graduate to the degree of Baehelor of 
Divinity. 

2 . The Diploma Course. ^'f^^^S. 
includes all the subjects in the d eg ee co« e excep t 
The candidate must have at least junior stana g 

Subjects in the Conference S^-*^^^ 
;« the Maclay curriculum and the certificate 01 
accepted by the Conference Board of Exammers. 



COURSES 



CLASSICAL 
(DEGREE) 

Junior Class 

CHURCH HISTORY 
ENGLISH BIBLE 
ELEMENTARY GREEK 
HEBREW 
HOMILETICS 
MODERN MISSIONS 
PASTORAL THEOLOGY 
SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

Middle Class 

CHURCH HISTORY 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

N. T. GREEK EXEGESIS 

HEBREW 

ORIENTAL MISSIONS 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

PHILOSOPHY 

SOCIOLOGY 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

Senior Class 
COMPARATIVE RELIGION 
HEBREW 
N T GREEK EXEGESIS 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

PHILOSOPHY 

SACRED ORATORY 

SOCIOLOGY 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 



GREEK-ENGLISH 
(DIPLOMA) 



Junior Class 

CHURCH HISTORY 
ENGLISH BIBLE 
ELEMENTARY GREEK 

HOMILETICS 
MODERN MISSIONS 
PASTORAL THEOLOGY 
SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

Middle Class 

CHURCH HISTORY 
ENGLISH BIBLE 
N T. GREEK EXEGESIS 
ORIENTAL MISSIONS 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY 
PHILOSOPHY 
SOCIOLOGY 
SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

Senior Class 
COMPARATIVE RELIGION 

N T GREEK EXEGESIS 
PASTORAL THEOLOGY 
PHILOSOPHY 
SACRED ORATORY 
SOCIOLOGY 
SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 



College of Theology 257 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Applicants will be admitted as special students in the above 
courses and students who wish to pursue selected studies 
in the College, but do not intend to graduate, mav be ad- 
mitted as Special Students upon recommendation' by the 
Dean and approval of the Faculty. Certificates will be given 
tor all subjects satisfactorily taken. 

THESES 

Applicants for the degree of Bachelor of Divinity, or for 
the Diploma, must present, on or before May first preceding 
graduation, a thesis of not fewer than four thousand words 
on a subject germane to a theological course. The theme 
may be selected by the applicant, but the selection must be 
approved by the Faculty. Thesis must be type-written, on 
good paper, e.ght and one-half by eleven inches in size 
bound and presented in duplicate. 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AND THE ENGLISH BIBLE 

JOHN G. HILL, J. H. MONTGOMERY, Professors 

Te 1 stament Pe Tlf. teUCha " d °£ Cr Histo ™al Books of the Old 

moral? £ c ° ngm ' h,story - tuition, cosmology, 

morals, laws, government, and religious philosophy of the 
Hebrews from Abraham to Solomon will be considered 
The questions of date, authorship, purpose, plan style of 
ItudfeT c rP° sltl .°" a "d ruling ideas* of each Vook will be 
studied. Two units; first semester. 

mL T T < l£ r0phetic *n d ChronicIe Books of the Old Testa- 

^« • 5 r £^ wlU SUrvey the varied a "d swiftly chane- 
m$ periods of Hebrew history from the close of the TTni^H 

£ef d0n VV h ? ?, nd ° f ° ld Testament times The gS test 
stress will be laid upon the study of the prophets then- 
unique place and power, their relation to sta?e and Church 

tZriZ^tlZ 55 ^ 5 and Permanent contribution to^the 
ustory ot religion. Two units; second semester. 

10. The Apostolic Age of the New Testament This 

ourse 1S a careful survey of the Apostolic cCch of the 

fc. CC? i U 7'/? ° ri ^ n - its stran S e success, its Sful cop- 
iers with Judaism, its brutal persecutions by Paganism and 
ts new life in the dying Empire; also a comparison ™f the 



258 University of Southern California 

of Jesus Christ »».I»'t»J^ '",*? „°d e rn scholarship. Spe- 

^^twIS^^nSrsS- Two units; second 

semester (Hill.) 

100. Israel's Wisdom and Poetic Literature. At i advanced 
course in the wisdom and poet .c^enrtu re ^ 
ments, together with a study ot B Babylonian 

Inf a Gr e e C k Xatur n e. ^Twfunits ; both semesters. 

SSfon^ fher^heTecls^TSorieal background - 
included. 

102. Israel's Social Instit utiom > The evolution ofjhe 
Hebrew family, tribe and « ate fading a . ^ 
origins. The course i des gned to g eg in 

edge of the customs and ideal ot ^ ^ 

o?t n he e Sd T.tSeltrafefX^ted. Two units; second 
semester. 

109 . The Social Teachings of Jesus and of the Prophets. 
Two hours, each semester. (Hill.; 

110 . The Teachings of Jesus ^^^^^s, 
study of Jesus' utterances a8 t0 ^ngTelf-consciousness, 
ffiS^-^W^k ^fure, etc. Two units; 
first semester. (Hill.) 

U2. The Messianic Age, A study of ^ ^ e -anc^an 
development of the Mess.amc hope m the ^oriental 
Egyptian, Babylonian ^ Persian - * e ° ciation of Christian- 
^t^/Vnarfx^etion^nd^fulfi^ment of this hope I 
Induae! Two units; both semesters. 



College of Theology; 259 

thl 13 A n Zl\ e ? aU l ine Theol ,°gy- A study of the theology of 
the Apostle Paul as revealed in his Epistles and in his dis- 
courses recorded in the Acts of the Apostles. Two units- 
second semester. (Douglas.) x wo units, 

114. The Johannean Theology. The teaching of I?™* 
accordmg to the Gospel of JohSfand the theology of John 

■ f ln hls Gospel Epistles, and the Apocalypse. Two 
units; first semester. (Douglas.) 

• cf l l°" . ? eli 5 ious . Pedagogy. A course designed to fit the 
student for teach.ng Bible Classes in Sunday Schools, teacher- 
training courses, etc. The teacher, his work, qualifications 

natu^^ne'K ^f^' ^ physica1 ' -entatand mora 
nature, the lesson; the teacher's approach to the student, etc. 
Iwo units; first semester. (Montgomery.) 

a 12 c , Th , e Modern Organization of the Church. The Sun- 
day School, Young People's Societies, various types of church 
organization; duties of various officers, committees etc A 

church d Two ed U n-K fit f ° r r" effident X ^ Se ™ e * thl 
cnurch. Iwo units; second semester. (Montgomery.) 

142. The Social Message of the Gospel. The moral h»<»i« 

? A S he ^ ial ^ UeStion; Christ ' s estimate of We; the social 
deals of the Kingdom Various social institutions are exam- 
ined to see if they conform to the Kingdom ideal The lines 

Two°"S atl0n a ", d leadershi P of the g church are Skated 
Two units; second semester. (Montgomery.) 

MISSIONS 

JOHN HEDLEY, Professor 

inlnlndrVht 1 ^ 1 " 63 d6aIS - wh V he ? istor y of Missions 
in an lands. The study comprises the periods of preparation 

rnL I fn° n de fi r ^ miSSIOnS: ^ present conditions in non cE 
mission fields; men and methods in missionary work- a sur- 
T -°J tj 1 ^ Met hodist Episcopal Missions; the problems of 

and C1 tvn e s el S ; , the , CX l e - nt ° f ^P^y; and the *u?mZ ions 
and types of leadership needed in different countries 

Mudents who anticipate work in the foreign field will find 
of \hlT\ e A* n ex c ce A le . nt Preparation for further pursuance 
°n.n^ f St u dl u S 1 ° f ? nental questions in the special depart- 
ment of which Dr. James Main Dixon is the Director 

21. The Genesis of Missions. A study of the nature uni 

Si witfth P e U r Se r^- r f- Hgi0n i- and a comparison of ChrU- 

tianity with the non-Christian religions. The spread of Chris 

lan.ty throughout the Graeco-Roman world, with special at 

hur'ch-fon" t0 /K he difficulti « which confronted The early 

church, followed by a survey of the missionary movements 



260 University of Southern California 

missionary movements of p ™ tes, »"„ missiona.y orgamaa- 
Pietists and Mem™"?,,'?, ff SSLity in its world-wide 
£8 , & e r' i es by assi g S rm d , y „, s I aS r p S a , pers y T»o nnita; seeond 

lems, methods and results, (b) ™ f f u e dal J c ^ ndi tions, and. a 

££ ^SaSS-SS? «fi ^ — T "° 

America, (a) The Awakening ;o India • AJM of christian 
tory of the Indian peoples, followed by a sur ^ fa dan 

missions, their problems and work (b TM ^ orld 

World. A study of . Mohammedanism » Redemp- 

Sday. Special use is ^ d o e f l*J h S'and racial problems 
tion of Africa. A study of the P^^ o{ Spanish-America. 
and of the Pagan people (d) ine £ AmericaS( the Spanish 
A study of the aboriginal ^ races ot ™e and sent -day 

conquest, the colonial and war per ^ w cour8e is con- 
struggles in South Amenca and Mex «£• q{ p rotestant 
S2 V Vwo^^^eSTemeste^. (Hedley.) 

ORIENTAL PHILOSOPHY AND COMPARATIVE 
RELIGION 

JAMES MAIN DIXON, Professor 

Oriental Philisophy an<3 L ReUgmns g /^tm Bud'hism, 

isii^^^^^'^ ism and Bushido - 

Two units; first semester. ^u^nbald 

Missions in India and Pe^^^^^l^ 

Missions in Japan, Korea, Formosa and the Philippine. 

Two units; second semester. 



College of Theology 261 

SPECIAL STUDY OF CHINA 

JOHN HEDLEY, Professor 

c. T J 1 - e 9, ivi H Zation of China ' Text book: Fryer's "Oriental 
studies. One unit; first semester. 

Missions in China: the Problem Today. One unit; second 
semester. 

HYMNOLOGY 

A study of Hymns, ancient and modern, with critical dis- 
cussions. Two hours; first semester. (Dixon.) 

NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

CLAUDE C. DOUGLAS, Professor 

1. .Beginning Greek. Those who have had no previous 
training in the Greek language will register for first year's 

W „° rk * V h t C ?" e - ge °J Liberal Arts > deluding exercises in 
any of the beginning books and one book of the "Anabasis" 
or its equivalent. Five hours each semester. 

• 2 ; f T he First Year's Work in the New Testament will con- 
sist of reading portions of the Gospels connected historically, 
with constant review of forms and constructions as a neces- 
nffi.-p 8 !° r C0 I re ct interpretation and exegesis. Exegesis 
of the Pastoral Epistles. Three hours each semester. 

, A Th f- S 1 C0 . n< ? Ye , a 5. i ? ^ ew Testament will be devoted to 
an exegetical s udy of Galatians, Corinthians, Romans, Philip- 
pians Thessalonians and Hebrews. Three hours each 
semester. 

HEBREW LANGUAGE AND HISTORY 

JAMES BLACKLEDGE, Professor 

The main object of instruction in this department is the 
h! C n U /- ir !f °- a Jl 00 c reading kn °wledge of the Hebrew text; 
hence during the first two years of the course special atten- 
nr;n,;r/ 1Vei V ? ral cI ass-reading exercises, the fundamental 
principles and rules underlying the Hebrew language, and the 
origin of grammatical forms, with some exegetical study dur- 
ing the second semester of the second year. The method 
exlfec ?r S ' £ y constant r - evie J w and Sequent composition 
possibk a " otherwise dry subject as interesting as 

5 tu T dv e o g f r ^i er t P3 . rt / > L the T 5 firSt two , y ears is d evoted to the 
study of the text of the Pentateuch. During this time the 

NeiSnr, r ^ ues A ted t0 l00k "P the inscriptions of Israel's 
Neighbors-the Assyrians and Babylonians-in the library 
is an aid in the study of the text. The latter half of the 



262 University of Southern California 

course will be largely « 3 ^ B £3^S^ a£ 
in Messianic prophecy and in the minor p v ^ ester there 

related subjects. Two hours each semester. 
CHURCH HISTORY 
TULLY C. KNOLES, Professor 

The first year begins with the to^Jjp*?™*^ 
the early Church, ^s controversies and councils the v ^ 
of the Church by the Stete and Ae jesu it, It 

Holy Roman Empire, and the organ za toon ot g ^^ 

discusses the great men of *Vrusades the rise and spread 
results of monastics™ .and the Crusades, the^ issance; d 

of Mohammedanism; S* 01 "* 1 "™ * n e n t X s Epochs are dwelt 
the pre-Reformation men an d moveme " ts ' f p „ t t0 study the 
with and an attempt is made to lead the student to s y ^ 
great formative movements, and to relate one e 
other, and thus to study ^^tffigfk those tenets 

S&fiSSSSZZ^ K inits; both semesters - 

SECOND YEAR 

108. Renaissance *™%g t ^£^&£™t 
fected European life and though . witn p ^ 

l^h^^^^ (Klingberg.) 

109. The Reformation. A study of J.g>— ^ 
SSSp?* OSWSA^. ^woUs; 
second semester. (Klingberg.) 

HOMILETICS AND PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

W E. TILROE, Professor 
The whole range of the lifeandwdcofa ^Utinue 
Gospel passes under review « * e8 |J u ££ miMio n ^ 
through two years. The caU ana ^ Qf 

preacher, the history f t f e e oast and the present, doctrinal 
eminent preachers of the past ana v hg Sunday 

preaching, evangelistic preach n& th pastor ^a niza 

School, the ^mister and s^.al problems and kindred 

tions, the institutional church, pastoral vw . impor t a nce 

subjects, will ^^l^^toiulm^cs the writ- 
demands. In the s P ec, al departmem or exe rcise of 

^SS^'S^SSSV^S^ P-inent place. 
Two hours each semester. 



College of Theology 263 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 
DEAN EZRA A. HEALY 

F a I ift 1 .» e J U t J l i0r A^^. the text book is Curtis' "The Christian 
n« ♦ ; - » $u-, Mld . dle year Sheldon's "System of Christian 
Doctrine." While these works form the basis of study for the 
students out of class, a wide reference to authors, old and 
new is encouraged, and all is supplemented by lectures and 
questions in the classroom hour. In the Senior year research 
in the library and in current theological literature, with essays 
on assigned subjects, and a continued attendance in the lec- 
ture room, will complete the work in this important field 

ine earnest and consistent aim of this department is to 
discover, maintain and defend the essentials of the Christian 
system. A solid Biblical basis is sought for every doctrine 
Special centers of study are the Deity of the Lord Jesus, the 
Atonement, and the Salvation which is by Faith 

J. wo hours each semester. 

SOCIOLOGY 

EMORY S. BOGARDUS, ROCKWELL D. HUNT, Professors 

GEORGE F. KENNGOTT, Associate 

HARRY J. McLEAN, Lecturer 

c^^,i Intr ° dUCti0n - *^ Sociology. A comprehensive study of 
f£n= p £? grtss > , wlth frequent application to concrete condi- 
Irilc ™ year S W< ? rk - closes with a summary of social pro- 

not o„1v j!fn C fh UrSe 1S lntend | d t°, serve as an introduction 
not only to other courses in Sociology but also to the other 
social sciences. Two units; throughout the year. (Bogardus) 

100. Principles of Sociology. An introductory course for 
n™ d ' V1S10n and graduate students. A fundamental course 
offts n?l f» analytical study of social life and the forces 
dat on for ™Jry° Pmen /' int , ende . d t0 Iav substantial foun- 
torv Ja „ rC advanced work. A good knowledge of his- 
deXahlp an T ac< l ualnt . an ee with biology and psychology are 
desirable. Three units; first semester. (Bogardus.) 

lernf' ,i: a f b0r .- Pr0bIems - A , discussion of the leading prob- 
lems confronting men and women engaged in industry 
(HJnt.) aS Ec0nomics 102 > T «ree units; fecond semester.' 

,n!f 8 ' . The ,. Li( l u or Problem. A discussion of the economic 

108 d ) SOC o a n e P U nft eS t° h f thC ,! iqUOr , Pr ° blem - < Same as Econom" 
iva.) Une unit; throughout the year. (Hunt.) 

Ro^s ' M S cDou Z? C £ti S7 - r aS , Cd ° n J assigned readin e s in 
f\ubs, mciJougall, Baldwin, Cooley, and others The ^nrial 

he tl s n elf S *I t m ft a d - eVelOPn i ent -° f . th ? idf » the sTcial nature' o 
aestih liiv H ° n ' CU i t0n ? lmitation . ^shion imitation. Sug- 
gestibility, the crowd, the mob, formation of permanent 



264 University of Southern California 

groups, group conflicts, group leadership, group conscious- 
ness. The formation of public opinion, its fundamental part 
in maintaining group stability and in securing group ad- 
vancement. Two units; first semester. (Bogardus.) 

114. Criminology. A study of crime from sociological and 
psychological points of view. Special attention is given to 
'methods for the prevention of crime. Some of the topics 
considered are: History of methods of punishment, prison 
systems, prison reform, probation, juvenile court, the George 
Junior Republic idea, juvenile self-government. Two units; 
second semester. (Bogardus.) 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

ALLISON GAW, PAUL S. WOOD, BENJAMIN F. STELTER, JAMES 
MAIN DIXON, Professors 

1. Introductory Course. Practice in composition, based 
upon a study of representative works in English literature. 
Required of all candidates for the bachelor's degree. Three 
units; throughout the year. (Gaw, Wood, Stelter, Scott.) 

20. General History of English Literature. Required of 
all students intending to do major work in English, and in 
general prerequisite to all courses in literature above Sopho- 
more grade. Three units; throughout the year. (Stelter, 
Scott.) 

133. The Period of Milton. Milton's poetry and most im- 
portant prose. Selections from the Church poets, Cavaliers, 
and prose writers of the period. Three units; second sem- 
ester. (Stelter.) 

145. American Literature. A survey from the beginnings 
in the colonial period toi the present day. Three units; first 
semester. (Wood.) 

154. Shakespeare. Analytical study of a series of Shakes- 
peare's plays in chronological order, in the light of English 
dramatic history and the contemporary social conditions. 
Three units; first semester. (Gaw.) 

177. Bunyan. A study of the life and works of the Puri- 
tan allegorist and idealist. Two units; first semester. (Dixon.) 

183a. Tennyson. The poet as lyrist and as interpreter of 
his age, with special attention to "In Memoriam." Two 
units; second semester. (Dixon.) 

SACRED ORATORY 

The course includes a study of the speaking voice, and 
those fundamentals of expression requisite for a pulpit 
speaker. It is the aim to teach a student to be simple and 
natural in his expression and when occasion shall demand, 
powerful, but at all times to preserve his individuality. The 
text used is "Vocal and Literary Interpretation of the Bible." 



College of Theology 265 

Course 2. Voice Building, Relaxation, breathing tone 
placement, resonance, rhythm, phrasing, melody, develop- 
ment of purity, strength, quality and control of tone. Two 
hours; both semesters. 

Course 7. Public Speaking: The consideration and deliv- 
ery of the various forms of public address, with platform 
exercises throughout the course. Rapid formulation of 
thought and its effective presentation is. acquired. Two 
hours; second semester. Bible and Hymn Reading will be 
included in this course. 

PHILOSOPHY 

RALPH TYLER FLEWELLING, Professor 

121. Personalism and the Problems of Philosophy. The 

relation of personalism to other philosophies, ancient and 
modern. Presupposes course 131. Two units; second sem- 
ester. (Flewelling.) 

122. Ethics. This course is based upon the text of Dewey 
and Tufts' "Ethics," with collateral study of Mill's "Utili- 
tarianism," Kant's "Metaphysics of Ethics," and Spencer's 
"Data of Ethics." The general nature of moral conduct, is 
studied, the evolution of the moral problem from primitive 
life to the present is traced, a comparative study of current 
ethical theories is attempted, and some application of the 
results of these studies is made to present problems of in- 
dividual and social life. Two units; first semester. (Flew- 
elling.) 

131. Theory of Thought and Knowledge. A consideration 
of the nature, origin and validity of knowledge, critical and 
constructive. Three units; first semester. (Flewelling.) 

132. Metaphysics. Treats of the main problems of phil- 
osophy, the theory of being, reality, self, the world, God, and 
the problem of evil. Three units; second semester. (Flew- 
elling.) 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES 

The School of Theology is in the immediate neighborhood 
of the College of Liberal Arts. It is constantly urged upon 
our students that the religious leaders must be intellectual 
leaders, and so a degree in Arts is made prerequisite to a 
degree in Theology. 

The intellectual atmosphere of the University tends to 
foster ambition in our men so that some who come intend- 
ing to take only the English course, or at most the Diploma 
course, change their purpose and are glad to graduate in both 
Arts and Theology. 



266 University of Southern California 

Students taking any one of the ~«»"> J^^&e^f 
be allowed four hours in each semester in the College 01 

Liberal Arts free of charge. cedents of 

The Pauline Association, organized by the students 01 

Maclay for mutual literary and religious improvement, is 

""he a Y n o d un g °M S eS S Christian Association of the University 
is well sustained and offers a fine field for both growth and 

W Abie men are in the pulpits of the city churches and so 
insoinW models of Gospel preaching are always available. 
1 iTe MeZd t Mission of Los Angeles calls upon our men 
for help throughout the year, furnishing opportunity for the 
best kind of training. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Tuition in Maclay College is free. 

A registration of $12.00 a semester is charged. 

Graduation fee five dollars. 

The University reserves the right to change any of the 
raS or d Icounts printed in this year book without notice. 

The requirement "of two hours throughout the Senior year 
in Sacred 1 Oratory is met by enrollment in .the College of 
Otatory, special arrangement being made as to fees 

Lectures by men and women of eminence in spec.a fields 
a« frequently given in the Assembly Hall and are free to 
*\Z SSXc in the Maclay College Building is provided 
for a limited number. Rooms will be assigned in the order 

^NmnTrol^cherSn the vicinity of Los Angeles find 
. P aSor n sTmo S ng our students, and *e District Superintendents 
arc glad to make such arrangements where it is mutually 

"If intormation and employment bureau is maintainec I by 
tbe University Y. M. C. A., which is very helpful to those 
who U wS to support themselves while in attendance at 
college. 

Any additional information promptly given on application to 

E. A. HEALY, Dean, 

The Maclay College of Theology, 

University of Southern California, 

Los Angeles. 



THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

The pharmacist of today requires a high grade of technical 
knowledge. The College of Pharmacy, an integral depart- 
ment of the University of Southern California, was organized 
to supply this demand; its aim and purpose being to create a 
means for higher pharmaceutical education, and to supply a 
broader foundation for the student's professional career by 
providing systematic instruction and special training in those 
subjects requisite for ifie successful practice of pharmacy. 

LOCATION AND EQUIPMENT 

ttP? 9 oll ** e of Pharmacy is located at 35th Place and 
University Avenue, on the campus of the University of South- 
ern California. " ■ 

The advantages of the metropolitan location of this College 
in the city of Los Angeles are obvious. 

For Equipment, see pp. 157-164. 

University Advantages 

The close association of the student of the College of 
? a r C 2 Wlth th ff 0S V f the ?' her colle S e s of the University 
L^Tu a 5° rds val V abl « opportunities of social cul- 

Sre^to\^?st d uae g nr° mment leCtUreS ° n SUbJeCtS ° f vital 
SCHEDULE 

unTiiVa'vio 11 iqIq °^u °T h /\ l >- 1918 ' and wil1 continue 
until May 30, 1919. The schedule is arranged for the fore- 
noon so as to allow students the privilege of retaining their 
positions as clerks in the stores of Los Angeles and neigh- 
boring towns while attending college. The hours of instruc- 
tion are from 8 a. m. to 12 m. 

CURRICULUM 

The subjects included in the curriculum are operative and 
dispensing Pharmacy; organic, inorganic, and analytical 
Chemistry; Botany; Materia Medica; Pharmacognosy Toxi- 

Druf A A n na i lyS * S: ^fi? 10 ^ Sanitar y Science" Food and 
Drug Anolysis; and Microscopy; together with special lec- 
tures upon business topics especially suited to the retail pfiar- 



268 University of Southern California 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

credited high school or other d P^^^^s than fifteen 
proved 'rank, requiring for graduation not ic 
units* of work successfully carried. 

Any deficiencies in the entrance ^XT/w'thTtXr 
in the Preparatory School ^ the University o 
approved by the College of Pharmacy. 

the work required by this College. 

d . To Graduate Standing-Persons who . tave received the 
degree of Graduate in Pharmacy (^ ' r ° m el ™^ r ° e f^ 
^ i^^SS^S^A Pa- 310.) 
EXAMINATIONS 

srtssw t c „7ir, ls . o h', y p™i n s y .of« < 'w, i ..,n ,»«■»<». o. 

the cause of his absence. 

Each student is ^^^^^T^Sff^t 
of the lectures and ^"^'^Sible for examinations 
exip^ w-hlre'pfmrTo JhTeMK he presents a satis- 
factory excuse for his absence. 

"^Ltials for the high school work done should he presented at the 

"T^Mr-Wis here used to ^^J^^X^^^ 
throughout one school year with f« ^ms «eraigj indicated for admis- 

r^-toTh^c^if^w Trts, ssss i~*«* — 3i - 50 - 



College of Pharmacy 269 

CONDITIONS FOR GRADUATION 

/ Jtl J^ e r candidate for the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy 
(Pn . G.) from this College must have fulfilled the following 
conditions: 

1. He must be of good moral character and must have 
maintained an irreproachable moral standing while in attend- 
ance at this College. 

2. He must have attended two full years in each of t»he 
departments of this College, or one year (the Senior) in 
this, after a course in some other recognized College of 

3. He must have attended at least eighty per cent of the 
lectures, reviews, and laboratory work. 

4 He must be present at Commencement unless excused 
by the Dean. 

• l h. The candidat ? for th e degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Pharmacy must fulfill the following conditions: 

1. Entrance. See. page 303. 

2. He must have completed 124 units, including required 
and elective work For detailed statement of courses, see 
Bulletin, College of Pharmacy. 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

PHARMACY 

ARTHUR R. MAAS, Professor 
1. Junior Pharmacy. The lectures of the Junior year treat 
of the history of the Pharmacopoeia. The subjects of weights 
and measures, percentage solution, and the arithmetic of dis- 
pensing and manufacturing pharmacy are considered at 
length Specific gravity and specific volume are demon- 
strated from various apparatus, which the lecturer thoroughly 
explains Heat is next considered, and then the operations 
wherein heat is used, as evaporation, distillation, sublimation, 
desiccation, exdesiccation, etc. This is followed by a discus- 
sion of the preservation of crude drugs and their preparation 
for manufacturing purposes, and the operations of decan- 
tation, filtration, clarification, maceration, infusion, decoc- 
tion, and percolation. The standard galenical preparations 
are critically studied in alternation with those of extempon- 
aneous pharmacy. While tfiey are discussed from the stand- 
point of their several classifications, such individual prepa- 
rations as merit it receive special consideration, the object 
being to familiarize the student with the reasons for each 
step taken in the manufacture of the different preparations 
1 wo lectures and six laboratory periods each week; through- 
out the year, Junior year. 



270 University of Southern California 

2 Senior Pharmacy. The lectures of the Senior year em- 
brace the study of the inorganic and organic acids and* 
silts o the different metallic bases. The commercial methods 
nf nreoaration are touched upon, and a special effort is made 
to ?each the student how to prepare them extemporaneously 
when necessity arises. In addition to the official compounds 
Those unoS ones which, through frequency of use merit 
it likewise receive attention. A study of alkaloids and the 
neu ral prindplelof vegetable drugs . follows. Extempora 
neous pharmacy is then resumed, including a through 
Hkrussion of dispensing. Facsimiles of physicians' prescrip- 
ts are by means |f the stereopticon, thrown upon a 
screen and thedass is drilled in reading those that are with 
difficulty legible. Chemical and Pharmaceutical mcompat- 
Sks are considered, and the best methods for overcom- 
ing hem are discussed. Two lectures and .six laboratory 
pedods^ach week; throughout the year, Senior year. 

3 Manufacturing Pharmacy. Visits are made to several 
large manufacturing establishments where the preparat urn of 
pills, tablets, fluid extracts, etc., is studied at length from a 
manufacturing standpoint. 

BOTANY AND MICROSCOPY 

ANDREW C. LIFE, Professor 

These courses in Botany and Microscopy are planned with 
esoedal reference to the needs of the pharmacist. Since most 
arues are parts of plants or are plant-products, a thorough 
knowledge of plant life is necessary to their dispensing. 

In these courses the student is furnished with a compound 
mirroscooe a hand lens, and dissecting instruments. The 
kcture room is supplied with a complete electrical projection 
apparatus Ty Which microscopic objects can be thrown on 
the screen before the class. 

i Rntanv The year is devoted to the study of seed- 

?PrVridoDhvtes). (1) The parts of the flower, leaf, root, ana 
stem arestudkd with reference to the classification of plants 
and thrnomenclature in each of ^e more important famd.^ 
o\ The microscopic structure of the parts of the plant is 
then studiXn ord P er to familiarize the student with the kinds 
of cells found in the stem, root, and leaves, Preparatory to the 

sti«? a ass-ass, -s^-cs 



College of Pharmacy 271 

and^ one laboratory hour per week; throughout the year 
Junior year. p J 

2. Microscopy. Throughout Course 1 the student has 
been learning the use of the microscope, its parts, the 
methods of preparing slides for temporary use, etc In 
Course 2 the student examines and uses the different kinds 
otomicroscopes and accessories. He learns how to measure 
microscopic objects (micrometry) and how to prepare per- 
manent slides of tissues and other objects. The laboratories 
are fitted up with a complete set of apparatus for photograph- 
ing microscopic objects; ten styles of compound microscopes 
ot ioreign and American makes; four styles of microtomes- 
a camera lucida; condensers; micrometers; and several hun- 
dred prepared slides for use in class work and demonstra- 
tion. Iwo hours laboratory per week; throughout the year 
Senior year. • J ' 

MATERIA MEDICA AND PHARMACOGNOSY 

LEWIS E. GILSON, Assistant Professor 
CHARLES W. HILL, Lecturer 

1. Junior Course. This course presents the subject in as 
broad, yet concise, form as possible. It is confined to that 
instruction that will be of greatest benefit to the student when 
the course is completed, giving larger consideration to those 
drugs that are most frequently met with in commerce. The 
course treats first of the drugs of vegetable (phanerogamic 
and crytogamic) origin, and then proceeds to consider the 
drugs of animal derivation. These agents are considered in 
an order based upon a commercial classification; first the 
Roots, then the Rhizomes, the Bark, the Flowers, the Fruit 
the beeds, etc. Each drug is considered as to its nature' 
origin, commercial and botanical relation, microscopical 
structure^ active principles, therapeutic action, doses, etc 
Adulterations, admixtures, and substitutes are thoroughly dis- 
cussed The work is based upon the Pharmacopoeia- at the 
f,t m £ - lr V C ^ Ue *} ttntlon is g^en to those remedies that are 
unofficial. One lecture and two hours laboratory per week- 
throughout the year, Junior year. ' 

CHEMISTRY 

LAIRD J. STABLER, Professor 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry. This is a course of lec- 
tures and demonstrations designed to be an introductory 
course in general chemistry, and including a consideration of 
the principles governing chemical action and a description of 
the properties of the various elements and their compounds 



272 University of Southern California 

SaVand their more ^^kmeX" qua ™f -^ 
practical instructions is given in el *™*£g* u week . first 
sis. Two lectures and six hours laDoraiuiy y 
semester, Junior year. 

2. Qualitative. AnalyJ^ This course , Joljo^ing ^ in 
General Inorganic Chemistry is a stuay o ids 

separation and identification of the pnn«p al bas« 

In" this work **^?^$J%Z£t v l^n&**4* 
copoeia are studied. T'ne stuaen an«"j makes tests 

a number of compounds unknown to him ^and m lg 

for impurities in ^^^ c \l^ t ^^^,^^A 
Two lectures^ and six hours laooraiuiy y 



semester, Junior year. 



compounds, alkal ? ld V^A ^Teceive attention, such as corn- 
operations occurnnff in nature receive atien, & _ 
bustion, dec^Jementat^, an^p^fachon 
tory work consists 01 trie -P*^ - eact i ons involved in 

per week; second semester, Senior year. 
The work of the course is divided as follows: 

Pharmacopoeie. 

(b) Toxicology. L.cturns in wkich », swdied the dif- 
ferent kind, of poisons SfA'^gVct* "o poisons? and the 



College of Pharmacy) 273 

is given to Posology, doses of potent drugs being given spe- 
cial emphasis. The practical laboratory work deals with the 
identification of t«he common poisons and also with the 
methods of separating them from various complex mixtures. 

(c) Urine Analysis. Lectures on both the normal and the 
pathological constituents of urine. In the laboratory the 
qualitative^ and quantitative estimation of sugar, albumin, 
urea, etc., is studied, and microscopic examination is made of 
the sediment.- 

(d) Food and Drug Analysis. Lectures and laboratory 
work. Each student will be required to make a number of 
assays of United States Pharmacoppceia preparations, and 
also to examine food products for preservatives and adulter- 
ants. The official methods of analysis of the Department of ' 
Agriculture will be employed. 

PHYSIOLOGY, HYGIENE, AND SANITARY SCIENCE 

ALBERT B. ULREY, Propessor 

The action of drugs on the body is a subject demanding 
attention of the pharmacist. He is responsible both mor- 
ally and legally for the results of this sale of drugs. A knowl- 
edge of the human body, its functions, and its proper care 
therefore becomes an absolute necessity to the present-day 
pharmacist. 

1. Physiology. A study of the human body, its parts, and 
the way ijt carries on the functions of digestion, circulation, 
etc. All the systems of organs are considered, and each of 
the fundamental processes is studied. The semester's work 
prepares the student to understand to some extent what ac- 
tions durgs may have on the body. One hour lecture and 
demonstration per week; first semester, Junior year. 

2. Hygiene. The care of the body as to the use of foods, 
drink, fresh air, eexrcise, etc.; the methods by which one may 
enjoy health as a result of right living and the injury likely 
to result from wrong habits; and the place of drugs in every- 
day affairs as they are related to hygiene. One hour lecture 
and demonstration per week; second semester, Junior year. 

3. Bacteriology. The nature of bacteria, the methods of 
growing them, and their place in nature. A sufficient acquain- 
tance with these forms is attained to enable the pharmacist 
to know which bacteria are beneficial, which disease-produc- 
ing; what conditions are harmful and what not; how to pre- 
vent decay in foods, and other substances; and the best 
methods of sterilizing and disinfection. Water, milk, and 
other foods receive special study with reference to the bac- 
teria they contain. This course gives sufficient practice in 



274 • University of Southern California 

disease-producing forms are HKeiy 10 up . Senior 

lecture and demonstration per week; first semester, bemor 



year 



4 Sanitary Science. A study of. (1) the nature of : in fee 
<h oamwijr dissemination and control; (2) the 

tious diseases and their dlsse ? nn<lL ,~ the distribution 

mmmim. 

•S7T, r°, id'eVo". 1 public build., »". i»X OI S 

year. 

AUXILIARY LECTURE COURSES 

C L LOWMAN, M.D., Lecturer in Medicine 

HOWARD P. PEAIRS, Lecturer in Jurisprudence 

L. SCHIFF, Lecturer in Commercial Pharmacy 

1. First Aid to the Injured. This course of ^^ 
e„«* is olanned to meet the immediate needs of the phar 
S cistfw^isoften called upon to render first aid m ace, 
dents and do general emergency work. The subjects toucuea 
on are wound! and their treatment, burns, fractures and I dis- 
hocaTonT poisoning, resuscitation from unconscious condi- 
tions, bandaging, etc. Senior year. 

2. Commercial Pharmacy. This course consist •**#««£ 

lectures on topics in connection with the conduct of the busi- 
ne'ss of Pharmacy, such as buying, selling, »«^<^£ 
tising, bookkeeping, correspondence, and general business 
building. Senior year. 

3. Pharmacal Jurisprudence. This cours ^?.^ ° f X a r- 
eral lectures in which the rights and responsibilities of phar 
macists and the laws affecting them are taken up and fully 
considered. The statutes regulating the P™*!" ^ /£", 
macy, with their constitutionality, are discussed Tne legal 
Hmits of Pharmacy, the right to practice, the legal Iqual h- 
cations of the pharmacist, etc., are considered together with 
£e lability of the pharmacist and the manufacturing phar- 
macist. Senior year. 



College of Pharmac}) 275 

GRADUATE COURSE IN PHARMACY 

The Graduate Course in Pharmacy is open to graduates of 
this college and to graduates of other colleges requiring 
equivalent qualifications for graduation. The course leads 
to t>he degree of Bachelor of Pharmacy (Phar. B.). 

/-dT° a ^ in i t0 the de ^ ree of Bachelor of * Pharmacy 
(.Phar. B.), the candidate must have complied with the fol- 
lowing conditions: 

1. He must have received, at this College or from some 
other reputable College of Pharmacy, the degree of Graduate 
ot Pharmacy (Ph.G.) under the conditions specified above. 

2. He must have completed at this College, a graduate 
course consisting of not less than twenty-five units of Uni- ' 
versity work and including the preparation of a satisfactory 
thesis embodying the results of original investigation in a 
subject in or allied to pharmacy or chemistry. 

' The University courses from which the graduate course in 
Pharmacy may be elected, are as follows:* 

Chemistry 1. Organic Chemistry. Lectures and recita- 
tions on the chemistry of the carbon compounds. Perkin 
and Kippings' "Organic Chemistry." Two units- both 
semesters. ' 

Chemistry 7a. Organic Preparations. A laboratory course 
m. the preparation of typical carbon-compounds in both the 
alipathic and aromatics series, to accompany course 7. Two 
units; both semesters. 

Chemistry 7b. Organic Preparations— Advanced. A labor- 
atory course m the preparation of higher organic compounds, 
with supplementary reading on theory and methods. This 
course is recommended to graduate students who expect to 
do technical work in the field covered by organic chmistry, 
or who desire to pursue research in chemistry for higher 
degree. Either or both semesters. 

Chemistry 8. Mineral Analysis. Gravimetric and volumet- 
ric analysis of representative minerals, ores, and alloys Pre- 
requisite, course 4 or its equivalent. Three or five units- 
either semester. 

Chemistry 9. Physical Chemistry. A lecture course or its 
equivalent. A general study of electro-chemistry is included 
in the work of the second semester. Bigelow's "Theoretical 
and Physical Chemistry" will be used as a main reference 
book. Two units; throughout the year. 

«r7w Ji h l foI !° win i? Iist one " unit " ec l uals one lecture or recitation hour 
or two laboratory hours. 



276 University of Southern California 

Chemistry 9a. Physical Chemical Measurements. A labor- 
atory W^ to accompany or follow course 9. Molecular and 
atomi we ght-determinations by vapor-density, boiling-point 
and f rewing-point methods. Problems in chemical equihb- 
rmm and reaction velocity. Determination of conductivity of 
el "routes fraction ionized ionic mobility singk : and double 
notentials 'the preparation of standard cells, three nours oi 
faboratory work a'week. One unit; throughout the year. 

Chemistry 10. Quantitative Analysis of Agricultural Prod- 
uct ^STmatic analysis of soils, fertilizers,, water dairy 
products etc. Prerequisite, course 4 or its equivalent. Three 
or five units; either semester. 

Chemistry 12. Food Analysis. A laboratory course in the 
cheSyofmat and meat products, edibles and fats dairy 
oroTucts cereal products, saccharine products, canned vege- 
tables cocoa, tea, coffee spices, vinegar, flavoring extracts, 
frnits and fruit products, fermented and distilled liquors, bak- 
ngpowdVrs? food preservatives and coloring matter. Open 
to students Who have completed courses 4 and 7. Two units, 
either semester. 

Chemistry 13. Industrial Chemistry. A lecture course cov- 
eru^Xe chemistry involved in the manufacture of oils, soap, 
sugar expSes/and other commercial products. . Lectures 
wm be given by chemists from various manufacturing estab- 
lishments. Prerequisites, courses 2, 3, and 7. Une unit, sec 
ond semester. 

Chemistrv i3a. Oil and Gas Analysis. A laboratory course 
in commercial oil and gas analysis. A special oil. laboratory 
s equipped for handling crude petroleum on a basis commen- 
surate with commercial practice. Two units; second semester. 

Chemistry 14. Assaying. This course comprises silver and 
*old extraction by scorification and crucible methods; the fire- 
Is ay of copper^lead, and tin; the extraction of gold from 
ores by the amalgamation, the tfilorination, the cyan.de, and 
the electrolytic processes. Two units; second semester. 

Chemistry 16. Research. Research work, under the direc- 
tion ofthe department, may be pursued in either pure or ap- 
plied Chemistry. 

RioWv 20 Advanced Bacteriology and Sanitary Science. 

Th B e 10 c 1 o u g r y se 2 con^ts of an advanced ^udy of Bacteriology m 
in relation to hygiene, sanitary science, and the worK ot tne 
pharmacist It consists in part of testing water, staining bac- 
teria and testing disinfectants, together with a study of the 
bacteria of foods. Two units; throughout the year. 



College of Pharmacy) 277 

Pharmacy 30. Thesis. Graduate students are required to 
present a graduating thesis showing the result of some origi- 
nal work in one of the departments of pharmacy. The sub- 
ject of the thesis must have the approval of the professor in 
whose department the thesis is selected. Thesis subjects 
should be selected not later than the middle of the first semes- 
tr. The completed work must be handed in two weeks 
before the close of college. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Tuition Fees. The tuition fee for each year is $100. The 
payment of this fee entitles the purchaser to one continuous 
course of lectures and laboratory instruction in all depart- 
ments. 

Laboratory Fees. A laboratory fee of $15.00 each year is 
charged for drugs, chemicals and other material consumed in 
the prescribed laboratory courses. 

Special Students may, by permission of the faculty, take 
any part of the course at a tuition fee to be decided by the 
Executive Committee. Medical students will find a syste- 
matic instruction in pharmacy an excellent foundation for a 
medical course. The instruction offered in this school of 
pharmacy will also give a working knowledge of chemistry 
to those interested in the engineering and metallurgical in- 
dustries. 

Laboratory Deposits. Chemical and pharmaceutical appa- 
ratus and supplies, together with microscopes and other im- 
plements required in the work of the course, are furnished 
by the College without expense to the student, but breakage 
or damage to apparatus must be paid for. For this reason 
each junior or senior student is required to deposit $15 00 
with the Secretary. This deposit, "or such portion of it as 
is not required for the specified purpose, will be refunded at 
the close of the term. 

A Diploma Fee of $10.00 will be required. 

Payment of Fees. All fees are to be paid at the beginning 
of the term. Where this is impossible, the laboratory deposit, 
the laboratory fee, and at least one-half of the tuition must 
be paid upon entering the class, the balance of the tuition 
tee to be secured by note to be paid sixty days from the date 
ot matriculation. Non-payment of fees debars the student 
irom the final examinations. 



278 University of Southern California 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Sueeestions to Prospective Students. It would be to A e 
,Se of students if they would matriculate, secure board- 

not be interrupted in the beginning of the college year. 

reduce the cost of board very considerably. 

A list of desirable rooms and boarding places may be 
obtained by addressing the Young Men's and Young Women s 
rhrktfan Association of Los Angeles or by inquiring at the 
offices of these organizations of the University in the College 
of Liberal Arts. 

TTmnlnvment The course of lectures has been so arranged 

saassss 3s£sk««> 8ive e,rery assis " 

ance possible in procuring it for them. 

Discioline and Good Order. All students are expected to 
wrvl the ormciples of good conduct and order while at- 
SXg the* C P oK!and pfain -fractions of the rules wiU be 
referred to the Executive Committee of the * ac 7J/» W11 
recommendation of reprimand, suspension, or expulsion. 

Athletics The Faculty encourages athletic sports. for their 
vafutn TeVeloping the^ody, in ^J«^&£ re pl S$ 

distanee away and is open to » e »" ,?' ""'"pEmacy are 
?SS S ,o"pfa~. TSXVS& Se^anf t,,c k S- 

of the University. 

Correspondence. Address all inquiries and other commu- 
nications to 

THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, 

Thirty-fifth Street and University Avenue, 

Los Angeles 



THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

FOREWORD 

The musical department of the University was founded 
thirty years ago By a faithful adherence to high standards 
its faculty have brought it to a well recognized position in 
higher musical education. Its diplomas have all the prestige 
which comes from its long and successful career and the 
name of the University. Its graduates and former students 
are taking prominent places in the musical world all over the 
bouthwest, both as teachers and performers 

Extended courses are offered in vocal culture, piano, organ, 
s trunZl tlca ' s . ub Je cts >/iolin, cello and other orchestral in^ 
struments, public school music, normal training, and eurhyth- 
mies. The end sought in every branch pursued by the student 
me S n U t C L^r^ gh H SS ** ^" e iv £. him , a genuine accomplish- 
a^ professional ° r ' nSUre mastery expected of 

ADVANTAGE OF COLLEGE STUDY 

;ncT,^w- gene $ a t!-T rit , of .earnest study characteristic of an 
institution of higher learning such as the University has been 
found to react very beneficially on the student of music, who 
In* r', 1 ? . ,ncllned '° superficiality. Breadth of character 
and liberal ideas are more surely attained in the atmosphere 
of general education than in that of specialized study 

Among the advantages of pursuing the study of music in 
an institution of collegiate rank and = methods the re m be 
mentioned the regular attendance at lessons required, the 
musical atmosphere created by the recitals, lecture! and class 
work, the college spirit and good fellowship created by asso- 
ciation w,th a body of earnest, wide-awak 'students of kin- 
work a {IT' . . he ^°PP° rt « nit y ^en for obtaining in class 
work, at very slight expense, the very best of trainin- i n the 
S etIcal / u °'essuch as harmony, theory and hislory of 
music— studies which are essential to the well-grounded 

mXTsson &* ** **** !**« ™»« ^"pon 
LOCATION 

Q^Itf £ ollege is now occupying its new quarters at 3201 

TH?i, w e f°2 ?u reet 'u, kn ? Wn , as the Marble Homstead. 
this is located three blocks from the University and one 

the C L n ,°f r i? P W h t ^1* Jef i erson Street car lin e, on one of 
and ^beautiful boulevards of the city. The picturesque 
and spacious grounds, covering an entire acre, include a tennis 



280 University of Southern California 

court, croquet grounds > anc I shad iff±SSSStXS& 
cent old trees, which offer a*"*™™ 1 °vv. ides a large 

for relaxation and divers °£ ™ Jg a g^ offic 

number of roomy and attractive sr uu , c h ar ming and 

an™ rooms for practice study jnd ^ ^ the splendid 
artistic atmosphere of the surround, g hool ed by 

facilities for carrying on the wort ^o ^ ^ institution . 
this location make it an ideal 

THE COURSE OF STUDY 

should be prepared to penorm on prev ious work, 

of different styles '^"sentat ve at tn £ department, 

All beginners are r X7 e tul a r advanced courses or merely 
Sl^^SSS^uSS^ ti- they devote to the 

StU T d h y e Normal or Collegiate es ^aTrethert aS^rtLTs and 
dents preparing *or *e prrf««on » ig^ h training in t4ie 
for amateurs desirous of obtaining i 

'Sfi Sn r ^ ,r c a o"," S e o l < h MS hm ac:o t di» S .0 .he .o^.ng 

outline: Credits. 

Harmony— 4 semesters ZZ...Z- \ 

Theory — 2 semesters 4 

TTar Training — 2 semesters 4 

ffistoo "oi Music-2 semesters • — 2 

M For completion of preparatory course ••- g 

For completion of Normal course ~— 4 

For Senior recital 4 

For recital attendance . 

Credits required of all graduates ~ 

Electives required according : te >™&^ b i£e.ter. 4 

For Piano students, Piano Normal * . j semes ter 2 
For Organ students, ^dvanced counterp^ ^^ , 

For Vocal students, piano— 2 se ^S^2 semesters'.'.'.... 2 
For Violin students^rche^practic^J sem^^ ^ 

50 

Total required credits 



College of Music 281 

The Senior recital required is to comprise a memorized pro- 
gram of standard works, one hour in length. 

The credits for recital attendance are given in full only for 
a record of 75 per cent of all recitals held during pupil's 
course. Any deficiency in these four credits may be made up 
by substitution of some regular study. 

The requirements are stated in terms of work accomplished 
rather than time spent, which must necessarily differ greatly 
according to differing abilities. The average student with fair 
aptitude by faithful work should cover the ground in about 
two years for each course, or four years in all. 

All regular students working for graduation are expected to 
take two lessons a week unless excused by the faculty. 

For postgraduate course see under heading "Bachelor of 
Music. 

No higher testimony can be offered to the efficiency and 
popularity of our work than the fact that many of our stu- 
dents return for years of subsequent study. 

ADVANCED CREDITS 

Students applying for advanced credits will be received con- 
ditionally into such classes as their instructors may direct, 
but such credits cannot be applied on their classification until 
after one semester's work. Enrollment in the school for at 
least one year is required of all graduates. 

DIPLOMAS 

Graduation is given only for the completion of the course 
in at least two departments, one of which must be that of 
1 neory. The diploma of the University is given at the com- 
pletion of the Normal or Collegiate course, upon recommen- 
dation of the faculty; but the college does not guarantee a 
diploma, certificate or degree to any student, although the 
prescribed courses may have been satisfactorily completed 
lhese honors are only given to those who have attained a 
standard which, in the judgment of the faculty, assures a 
worthy representation of the college. 

TEACHER'S CERTIFICATES 

Teacher's Certificates will be given to those who have com- 
pleted the work of the Normal course, but who for any reason 
are unable to give the public recital required for graduation, 
iney will, however, be required to give before the faculty a 
program of a somewhat less exacting nature than that re- 
quired for the diploma. 



282 University of Southern California 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

The requirements for this degree are as follows: ^^ 

• ... 50 

Full graduation with diploma •---•• ••-'"■" -» 

One ^ar's full work in the College of Liberal Arts 30 

graduation in a second branch of applied music- 

Preparatory, 8; Normal, 8; Elective, 4; Rectal, 4, total..- 
Or Composition course as follows: 

Composition, 4 semesters -- — "*.!* 

Advanced counterpoint, 1 semester 8 credits 

Canon and Fugue, 1 semester ^ crea t 

Instrumentation, 2 semesters ""•* Vf,,' 

Original cantata or work for orchestra, 20 minutes ^ 

in length . 

104 

Total 

The college work required is to be elected from the follow- 
i J subject!* Education, Psychology, Modern Language, 
History, English Composition, English Literature. 

CREDITS IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

To students who have met the ffco;««E 

^ff-rs^4 ^^m 1 ^ entire 120 

units required for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

r„iwe students applying for credits for music work done 

can be granted. 

DEPARTMENT OF EURHYTHMICS 

culture. 



College of Music 283 

Piano Study for Children 

A course based upon fhe most modern ideas of musical 
development. 

The child is taught to feel, hear, think, and express himself 
through many forms of study which are a delight, yet always 
instructive. 

Class Work combined with the private lesson gives oppor- 
tunity for ear training, rhythm drills, and elementary har- 
1 u 0ny 't-T h . e pupi1 ac( l uire s greater alertness and confidence 
through friendly rivalry and the experience of playing before 
others. 

From the first original work is encouraged and carefully 
guided along the line of greatest value to the individual. 
One half the class period is devoured to Eurhythmies. 

ANAHEIM DIVISION 

a A branch of the College of Music is maintained at Anaheim 
in a centrally located studio under the direction of Miss Trow- 
bridge. 

Courses are offered in piano, voice and violin. 

Mr. Harold Walberg, member of the Los Angeles Sym- 
phony Orchestra, and well established as a teacher and 
soloist, has charge of the violin pupils and has given excellent 
proof of his ability through the playing of his pupils on the 
programs given quarterly. 

Miss Lillian Backstrand has charge of the vocal work and 
has represented the school on local programs. 

BUSINESS REGULATIONS 

The work of the academic year is divided into four ten week 
i! ri ?n'io egl ^ n ^? respectively on September 9 and November 
18, 1918, and February 3 and April 14, 1919. 

Students must register and secure entrance cards before 
they^ begin their lessons. A student may register at the be- 
ginning of the term or for the unexpired portion thereof The 
entrance card must be presented to the instructor at the first 
lesson. No deduction will be made for absence from the first 
two lessons. 

The work of the term begins on the date advertised, and 
students who enter late will find themselves behind their 
classes. 

Terms: Tuition is payable in advance at the beginning of 
each term. & 

Limited credk is sometimes allowed where satisfactory 
references are given Application for credit must be made 
to the management through the office. 



284 University) of Southern California 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Total Expenses by the Ten-Week Term 

(Four terms per year) 

Piano or Organ-Mr. Skeele. Q 

45 minutes, once a week, $30 00, twice a week , $50.00 
30 minutes, once a week, $25.0U, twice d 

Piano-Miss Trowbridge sooo 

g mmuS once a wet SSl 23? a week! I^O.OO 

Piano Normal-Miss Trowbridge 

45 minutes, class, twice a ™ ee V™:^ 
Interpretation class, once a week, $5.UU. 

Piano Study for Children-Miss Trowbridge. 

One class and one private lesson per week, ?ZU.W. 

Piano— Mrs. Forbes. & k $25 qq 

45 minutes, once a week, $12.50, twice a wc , * 

Harmony-Miss Alchin ^^ 

45 minutes, once a week, $30.00, twice * 

45 minutes, class twice a week, $10.00. 
Theory Harmony or History— Mr. Pemberton. 
T 45 minSes, once a week, $15.00; twice a week, $30.00. 

45 minutes, class, twice a week, $10.0U. 

Violin— Mr. Pemberton; ..'... , <Kn (in 

1 L hour, once a week, $25.00; twice a week, $50.00. 

^no^nfeTweek, $30.00; twice a week, $60.00. 
40 minuses! once a week, $20.00; twice a week, $40.00. 

Violin-Mr. Rosenfeld. $5000 

30 minutes, once a. week, $25.00, twice a wee , ? 

Cello— Mr. Bright. k $6000 

g mlnuS once a wet, SSSS; -ice a week, f 4 0.00. 

ttSKS £2^* $40.«X>; twice a week, $60.00. 

Vocal-Mr. Cogswell. $6000 

30 minutes, once a week, $35.00, twice a wcc , * 

Vocal-Miss Backstrand, $3000 

30 minutes, once a week, $15.00, twice a wc 



College of Music 285 

Public School Music— Miss Chute. 

(Ear Training, Sight Singing, Appreciation, Methods, Mate- 
rials, or Conducting.) 
1 hour, once a week, $15.00; twice a week, $30.00. 
45 minutes, class, twice a week, $8.00. 

Rental of Pipe Organ, one hour each day $12.00 

Piano rental, one hour each day 2 50 

Incidental fee * 25 

Fee for Diploma, Certificate or Degree ZZZ."Z. 10.00 

The University reserves the rig*ht to change any of the 
rates or discounts printed in this year book without notice. 

For courses of study and further particulars send for special 
booklet; address 

THE REGISTRAR, COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

3201 South Figueroa Street, 

Los Angeles. 

Phones: Home, 24654; Sunset, South 3423. 



THE COLLEGE OF ORATORY 

PURPOSE. "All li£ ^s .back ytog*^*& 
speech, the medium through wnicn we tion of our 

each other; for all ^co™* j£cyo the Quest 
relations with each other. These rei«ion * ^_ 

ssssartt »s&nfW ~*3w -* •-» 

^Sr^sefoTIhe College to^^j«cl^ 
high ideals through the s£d y of great liter ^ 

Sthe phtica ! instrfmentas a clear medium of expression. 
Credit in the College of Liberal Arts 
A student in the college .of Liberal .Art. may e^a max- 
imum of fifteen hours from the marKea ^ ; 
College of Oratory. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

la. Fundamental Technique of ReacUng A £Oog£«*g 

of the natural vocal V?«*}"«?l^* e %£toce*s«bot- 
terpretation of the printed page phrasing sq ms 

units throughout the year. 

to twenty-two.) 

2. Voice and Diction. This ffl *J darted to the^ree- 
i„g of the vocal instrument. n C O f n f h d f ^"t, re sonance, in- 

nicSfag^i^ ?SU£«* — »" 
tion Three hours, throughout the year. 

4. Story-telling The story as "^^Slri^ 
gJftSd o^tlf c&%° dSpment. Study of sources; 



College of Oratory 287 

adaptation of material; actual practice in story-telling. The 
work is designed to meet the needs of student, teacher, li- 
brarian and mother. Two units, throughout the year. 

*5. Public Speaking. The consideration and delivery of 
various forms of address, with platform exercise throughout 
the course. Rapid formulation of thought and its effective 
presentation are acquired. Two units, throughout the year, 

6. Educational Dramatics. Interpretation and presenta- 
tion ot the drama; practical instruction in the staging of 
plays; a study of dramatic law. Members of the class are 
given # practice in conducting rehearsals. One Shakespearean 
p ay is staged during the year, besides scenes and one-act 
plays by the best dramatists. Two units, throughout the 
year. 

7. Individual Instruction. Private lessons are arranged to 
meet the needs of the individual, in order that a high stand- 
ard ot art may be attained, together with a well rounded 
repertoire. One forty-five minute period per week through- 
out the course. 

100. Advanced Voice. The continuation of the technique 
of technique of voice building with an application to interpre- 
tation. Two units, throughout the year. 

•101. Art of Interpretation. "Literature is one of the fine 
arts— it is the language used for those ends of emotion, imag- 
ination and beauty which are sought by the painter, by the 
sculptor and by the musician. More important still, litera- 
ture is an expression of human life." 

, Vocal interpretation, from the point of view of the artist 
involves an understanding of this intimate relation between 
literature and life as well as the training of the vocal instru- 
Si r f P° nd t° the demands of the thought, form and 
emotion of every type of literature. 

HtSS 1S ( a tW ° y *?u C °? rse . indudin g a survey of the various 
literary forms with selections from masterpieces; contem- 
dra^T ^ature; Biblical literature; classic and modern 
Course lb ° ' throu S hout each year. Prerequisite 

*102. Shakespeare. Altho primary emphasis is placed on 
the vocal -interpretation of the line, sufficient attention is 
given to the construction and history of each play studied 
to ensure clear literary background. Two units, throughout 
the year. Prerequisite Course lb. g 

ooem' t£ b n!? g 1 me ^i/7 angement of the short story, the 
££?'* * ° vel and the d^ma for public presentation. Two 
units, first semester. 



288 University of Southern California 

*704. Argumentation and Debate. A practical and theoret- 

units, second semester. 

and "home-made" tests in reading. 

ISI'tK One unit, thronghon. the year, 
b. Reading and Literature. De.igned for the teaehers » 

of oral and silent reading; the value and scope op and _ 

instruction. One^nit, throughout the year, 

*?nn Interpretation. Lectures on the technique of the 

^.V el (Opro„. y To SndSe e , C .o. teacher's certificate. 
?m Advanced Interpretation. Intensive analysis ot 
„a^.pfeS"om '"« «» to^rf X' "'."".Sing "he 
™ S ia5°r A." "ctr to. , °co'ii"ege nl g S „ , nu.««s. Two nnit, 

throughout the year. t 

202. The Teaching of Oral English The ^™Zo°ul 

Oratory.) 



College of Oratory 289 

ENTRANCE AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Diploma Course. A student upon entering the Diploma 
Course must be a graduate of an accredited high school 
or preparatory school. The course consists of: three years' 
individual instruction, one forty-five minute lesson per week- 

f m ZT9°nn ere ?V he f ollege of ° rator y < exce Pt those 
numbered 200 and above); one year Physical Education; 
thirty prescribed units in the College of Liberal Arts. 

Teacher's Certificate Course. Upon entering this course a 
student must hold a Diploma from the College of Oratory 
or its equivalent, and in addition must complete the remain- 

20? in t h Xt r n mtS '^ he C ° llege of Liberal Arts - Course 
wi L , j, Co > 8e ° . 0ratol 7> one year Physical Education 
and lour hours practice teaching under the direction of the 

?h°e &£ n^A^f X his C0UrS ? fulfills the requirements of 
tificate ° Educatlon for a s P ecial Teacher's cer- 

tn ?t ader ', S ^ 0UrS /- This is a culturaI cours e and requires 
the completion of two years' individual instruction, one for- 

ini i e n* mm T Ute h"° n per week; cour ses 1, 2, 3, 6, 100, 102, 
10J, 106. In addition, a student may elect any two of the 

i r e e S a o n f m Liberai r Arts and ^ three " hour sub -> ect in ^ Col- 

Special One Year Course for College Graduates. A certi- 
fied statement is granted to college graduates upon the sat- 
isfactory completion of courses 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 101, 104, 201. In 
addition, any four hours may be elected. 

RECITALS 

Pupils' recitals are given every week. Participation in 
these is required that the student may have practice in ap- 
pearing before audiences. All students enrolled in the school 
are expected to be present at each recital. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES 

a. This is the only School of Speech in the west which has 
Department? advantages of the University and the Special 

a S' um hPr h nf St r dent ^ P rivile S ed to appear in public recital 
a number of times during the year. 

c. It is the purpose of the school to present to the stu- 
dents each year readers and artists of merit. 

and o^It^f C ° UrS - eS ar / of ^ ered late in the afternoons 
and on Saturday mornings for the benefit of teachers. 



290 University of Southern California 

. One scholarship is awarded yearly to that Diploma 
Senior who n addition to the need for assistance, has suc- 
ceeded in establishing a high standard of work. 

f. Special corrective courses are planned for individuals 
suffering from defective speech. 

g. Both individual and class instruction are offered during 
a summer session of six weeks. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Fees are payable at the offiee of the College of Oratory. 
Class instruction, per semester, 18 weeks. 

co sfe art sf««&»~ 

Registration fee, per semester (not refundable) ? 1( g 

♦Full Diploma Course, per semester lM 

Full Reader's Course, per semester m00 

Special one year course - yy^"--["-r t ~^ 45.00 

One Private lesson per week, (45 minutes) 

One Private lesson per week, (30 minutes; 

A course of ten lessons, (45 minutes 50 

A course of ten lessons, (30 minutes) - ^ 

Single lessons, (30 minutes) 3 50 

Single lessons, (45 ml ^f a cs hr^"^es) '—-1... 10.00 

Class, one or two periods, (55 minutes; l5(X) 

Class, three periods, (55 minutes; 500 

Coaching Plays, (60 minutes)- 500 

Coaching Debate, (60 minutes) 

-^T^atory and Liberal Arts requirements are ineluded in above 



tuition. 



Special rates given to students entering University Con- 

tests ' ' ...$10.00 

Diploma fee " 5 qq 

Reader's fee >• 

The graduation fee is payable 30 days in advance. 
Send for a catalogue of the College of Oratory. 
ELIZABETH YODER, Dean, 
College of Oratory, . 

University of Southern California, 
Los Angeles. 
Thirty-fifth Street and University Avenue, 



THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 

OUR AIM 

The value of a school can onlybe measured by its efficiency. 
The success of the graduates of this college in the public and 
private schools and studios of California and Eastern cities 
is ample testimony to the efficiency of our methods. 

The college motto, "ONLY THE BEST IS WORTH 
WHILE," is a compelling incentive and nothing will be 
spared at any time in our efforts to make the College of 
Fine Arts, U. S. C, the best in this country, ideal in every 
respect. 

LOCATION AND EQUIPMENT 

The special advantages of this school are many. The Col- 
lege of Fine Arts of the University of Southern California is 
situated on a cliff overlooking an unspoiled natural park, the 
tamed Arroyo Seco, with a perennial stream and groves of 
magnificent trees, rocky cliffs and acres of boulders, wide 
stretches of oak-dotted sward, and the eternal snow-capped 
mountains closing every vista. Near at hand are mountain 
canyons, sandy beaches, rocky promontories, and an unpar- 
alleled variety of race and costume for models. Probably 
no spot in the world of the same area offers more variety or 
greater abundance of paintable material, and the idea) climate 
permits of outdoor work almost continuously. 

The buildings are handsome and commodious. There are 
nine large, well-lighted and well-ventilated studios; a picture 
gallery; an assembly room with piano; a reception room; 
cloak rooms and dormitories with every possible convenience' 
Every room is perfectly furnished for its purpose. There is 
an abundant equipment of sculpture, casts, designs in archi- 
tecture, pottery, metal, jewelry, etc. The library contains all 
the standard art magazines and many volumes upon art sub- 
jects. There are also ample grounds for recreation and out- 
door study. 

The curriculum embraces every department of graphic and 
plastic art that can be learned from teachers or books. This 
fullness of curriculum and the constant supervision of each 
department of work by expert teachers, giving instruction 
that is largely individual, insure that the student will have a 
thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of art and 



292 University of Southern California 

THE FORWARD MOVEMENT 

wfco once enters the spirit of this sch °° ! "£ . and 

the enthusiasm which makes a joy of one s occupation 
is the surest guarantee of success. 

decora.inE, in design all W™j**£" When novelty is 

SiS»o^£n C SSo»Tu'--^ » - -r*" 
and down-to-the-minute. 

The purpose of the College , o f Fine Arts Moj™^ 
Ae student a practical . twentieth century c hh 

Sffi^iSS «»£ d ha ra1ound a Cade mic train- 
ing of the eye, the hand and the imagination. 

These things make for V"^**^^^^ 
Competition in all lines is t^^V^eaSng numbers. 

that tfiey are overcrowded with incompetents. 
THE COURSES 
Entrance Recrements £ ^^S^SJb^hS 

of Liberal Arts. 

shown. 

Students may register for ^1 branch es to^t aken 
separately. In such cases certificates or P inations . 

f^t^^tf^ffir^enS the school at any 

time without examination. 



College of Fine Arts 293 

PAINTERS' COURSE 

(Four Years) 
(Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts) 

^ First Year. Charcoal drawing from the cast; clay model- 
ing; ^pencil drawing from landscape; mechanical drawing, in- 
cluding geometry, perspective and projection; art history and 
mythology. 

Second Year. Composition and drawing from life of draped 
and nude figure, portraiture, landscape; anatomy, modeling; 
water color; art history, sacred history; applied design, pot- 
tery, wood carving, metal work; German or French. 

Third Year. Painting in water color and oil from life and 
landscape; pen and wash drawings; composition; modeling, 
composition and design; normal teaching course; German or 
French. 

Fourth Year. Specializing in the chosen line in painting 
or sculpture. 

ARCHITECTURAL COURSE 

(Four Years) 
(Leading to the Degree of B.S. in Architecture) 

First Year. Mathematics, including college trigonometry 
and algebra and plane analytical geometry; college physics; 
English; freehand drawing; mechanical drawing; shades and 
shadows; and elements of architecture. 

Second Year. Differential and integral calculus; German or 
French; drawing from life; descriptive geometry; perspective; 
materials of construction; history of architecture; working 
drawings and detailing; and elementary architectural designs. 

Third Year. Mechanics and strength of materials; graphic 
statics; structural design; water color; pen and ink render- 
ing; building illumination and acoustics; sanitation; history 
of architecture; history of ornament; and intermediate archi- 
tectural design. 

Fourth Year. Clay modeling; structural design; reinforced 
concrete; heating and ventilating; advanced architectural de- 
sign; professional relations, and thesis. 

For full description of this work see Architecture, College 
of Liberal Arts. 

TEACHERS' COURSE 

(Three Years) 
(Leading to a Diploma) 

Identical with the first three years of the Degree Course, 
except that the requirement of French or German is omitted. 



294 University of Southern California 

ILLUSTRATING COURSE 

(Three Years) 
(Leading to a Diploma) 

First and Second Years. As in painter's course. 
Third Year. Painting in water and oil pen and wash draw- 
h^ caricature, cartooning and composite. 
DESIGN COURSE 

(Three Years) 
(Leading to a Diploma) 
First Year. Free hand and mechanical drawing, original 
design, art history, mythology. 

Second Year. Composition, color harmony, original design, 
anatomy. 

Third Year. Historic ornament, fabrics, interior decorat- 
ing, applied design. scuLpTURE 

(Three Years) 
(Leading to a Diploma) 

First Year. As in painters course. 

nientS ' SPECIAL COURSES 

Commercial Art. Advertising, design, poster painting, let- 
tering, card writing. 

chalks, harmony, design, etc. 

Jewelry. Wire and band work, casting, chasing, jewel set- 
ting, enameling, and design. 



College of Fine Arts 295 

Pottery. Clay modeling, the potter's wheel, moulding, glaz- 
ing, firing, underglaze painting, harmony, and design. 

Mural Painting. Drawing, water color and oil painting, 
color harmony, composition, and practical application. 

Interior Decorating. Drawing, design, color harmony, com- 
position and the nature and uses of materials. 

Art Glass. This includes design, hard-metal mounting, 
leading, cutting, color harmony, painting on glass, and firing. 

Transient students may take any parts of courses as special 
studies. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

A summer school is maintained, beginning about July 1st 
of each year. All branches of fine and applied art are taught, 
the fees being about the same per month as in the full course. 
Special circulars will be mailed on application. 

PRIZES 

A gold medal is awarded to the student making the best 
record for t»he year. * 

A scholarship for one year is awarded to the member of 
the graduating class making the best record. 

Frequent competitions are open to advanced students, en- 
titling the winners to certain school privileges. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

(All-day lessons: Hours 9 a. m. to 12 m. ; 1 p. m. to 4 p. m.) 

Full Collegiate Course $95 00 

Collegiate Semester ..1'."... 5000 

Per month, six per week """*""""""""""" 15^00 

Per month, three days per week ".. 750 

Per month, one day per week ^..........".." 4 50 

Single lessons, each "..'"' 200 

Laboratory fee for Crafts, per term ZZ1'."...."" 1 00 

Graduation fee c'qq 

SPECIAL BRANCHES 

(When taken separately from courses) 

Landscape, per month, one day per week $6 00 

Commercial Art, per month, one day per week 600 

Pottery 4 ' 5o 

Metal and Jewelry, per month, one day per week 600 

Art Glass "" ^'^q 



296 University of Southern California 

REMARKS 

TwVare 5 ArSlctSre^wiek on anatomy and other art 
suSect e s "U ^o 'all enrolled students, with occas.onal lectures 
^T^T^lLT^Tn^s, lockers boards easels etc. 

Material! are furnished to students at the lowest rates 

"t^l^t?l2^?te«*«* at reason- 
ab The a pkture gallery is open to the public afternoons. 



THE UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 

The University High School, a standard high school for a 
limited number of students, is maintained in connection with 
the Department of Education of the College of Liberal Arts 
in the University of Southern California. It is located on 
the campus of the College of Liberal Arts at West Thirty- 
fifth Street and University Avenue in the city of Los Angeles. 
The campus can be reached conveniently from the center of 
the city by either the University or West Jefferson Street 



cars. 



The School uses for recitation purposes some of the lecture 
rooms of the College of Liberal Arts. The library, museums, 
laboratories, gymnasium, and athletic equipment of the col- 
lege are at the disposal of the high school students. A 
detailed description of this equipment will be found under 
the heading of General Information in the portion of the 
Year Book devoted to the College of Liberal Arts. 

Instruction in the University High School is given under 
the direct supervision of a corps of experienced teachers. 
Instructors in the various classes hold the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, or its equivalent, and devote themselves to the pre- 
sentation of the academic subjects in which they have special- 
ized. The limiting of the enrollment in the High School to 
150 makes possible classes of moderate size and considerable 
personal attention to individual students. 

The immediate aim of the High School is to prepare its 
students for entrance to the various colleges of the Univer- 
sity. The curriculum, however, provides a liberal high school 
education for those students who may not be able to attend 
higher institutions of learning. The needs of students desir- 
ing to take special courses will receive careful attention. 

For detailed information concerning courses, etc., address: 
Office of the Principal, University High School, University 
of Southern California, Los Angeles. 

GENERAL SCHOOL ORGANIZATION 

The School Year: The school year consists of thirty-six 
weeks, extending, for the year 1918-1919, from September 
3th to June 10th, and is divided into two terms, or semesters 
Kecesses are indicated on the University High School Cal- 
endar, 



298 University of Southern California 

The School Day: The school day begins at 8:00 a. m. and 

as •?£ ir i8 *;.i?rVi r *» . ft ».»y 

Variations from this rule must be approved by the principal. 

The School Period: Periods are fifty ™ in " tes j"' 611 ^ 
with five-minute intervals between periods. Periods tree 
Trom recitation or laboratory engagements are devoted to 
study in assigned rooms. 

Assembly: Two periods a week are used i tor gener al 
assemblies and chapel exercises. Attendance of all pupils ,s 
required. 

Attendance: Regular and punctual attendance at all school 
apto ntmTnts indicated on the pupil's study-card I » ^ed- 
Absences must be excused at the principals office betore 
Attendance "resumed. Pupils living at home are required 
o present written excuses for absences «^^ ^ ^ 
guardians Boarding pupils must give verbal excuses to the 
Principal Work lost by reason of absences must be made up. 

Antics- In addition to systematic gymnasium jnstruc- 
tiom Afuniv^rsftyHigh School provides oP^rtjUe" for 
oarticipation in various school sports, such as football, basket 
haff track baseball, and tennis. These sports are supervised 
by Competent directors and manager. Eligibility for parUci- 
pation in interscholastic contests 1 \ d f te [ min A e t d M ^ ic th L e ea r " 1 u e e S 
of the Southern California InterscholasUc Athletic League, 
of whict the University High School is a member. 

Social Activities: The only social organizations recognized 
by riieschool authorities are the four regular classes and the 
student body itself. Occasional parties and picnics add to 
the enjoyment of the life of the school and serve to develop 
the social natures of the pupils. 

Societies and Clnbs: Organizations paving definite educa- 
tional value are encouraged and fost Xl al ^tanding and 

the school. 

Discipline: Inasmuch as the University High School aims 
to devetp in its pupils individual responsibility for personal 



University High School 299 

behavior, few formal rules are laid down. The highest social 
standards of conduct are expected to govern the relations 
between students, and between students and instructors. 
Should a student persistently refuse to comply with these 
standards, he will, for the sake of the general good, be 
asked to withdraw his membership from the school. 

ADMISSION 

Application for admission to the University High School 
may be made in personal consultation with the principal, or 
by correspondence. The applicant must be able to prove 
preparation equivalent to that required for entrance to a 
regular state high school and to give references for good 
moral character. 

Applications should be addressed to The Principal of the 
High School, University of Southern California, Los Angeles. 

REGISTRATION 

On or before the appointed registration days in September 
and February, each student must register at the office of the 
principal. After consultation with representatives of the reg- 
istration committee concerning courses of study, each stu- 
dent will receive a study-card and an enrollment-card, upon 
which will be entered the subjects desired for the semester. 
The study card will be for the guidance of the student. The 
enrollment card must be filed with the Treasurer of the 
University when the registration fee is paid. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The following groups of courses are offered in the Hio-h 
School: to 

Group I. English. 

Group II. Foreign Language. 

(a) French. 

(b) German. 

(c) Greek. 

(d) Latin. 

(e) Spanish. 
Group III. History. 
Group IV. Mathematics. 
Group V. Science. 

Group VI. Economics and Sociology. 
Group VII. Art and Drawing. 
Group VIII. Physical Education. 



300 University of Southern California 

The principal and vice-principal will endeavor to organize 
Jeach sUent a definite four-year course of study suit, 
to the needs and aims of the individual student. The tallow 
ing considerations will govern the selection of the students 
course: 

(1) Requirements for graduation from the Univers.ty 
High School. m ti » 

(2) Requirements for entrance to the college for 
which the student is preparing. 

(3) The principle of distribution: The student will be 
required to form some acquaintance with he 
major fields of knowledge as represented in the 
eieht groups above. . 

(4) Sequential study: The student will be required t G 
W follow the courses of at least one of the above 

groups (I to VII inclusive) throughout his high 
school course. 
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 
A diploma of graduation will be granted to each student 
who completes fifteen units of the courses described on the 
xollowrgpages; provided, that the fifteen units be made up 
as follows: 

2 units 

English 2 units 

A Foreign Language \ un it 

A Laboratory Science 2 units 

Algebra and Plane Geometry.... x unit 

United States History and Civics VZ'.'.Z 7 units 

Electives , 

and provided that the student has been in attendance at the 
University High School for at least two semesters preceding 
the completion of the work described above. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRANCE TO THE 
COLLEGES OF THE UNIVERSITY 

(b) The Engineering Courses (Architectural, Cml, Electncal, Mm 

ing and Chemical). * 2 

English 2 

A Modern language ...3... 1 

Chemistry 1 

Physics - 1 

Elementary Algebra x 

Advanced Algebra ! 

Plane Geometry y 2 

Solid Geometry - ' 



University High School 301 

Trigonometry y 

U. S. History and Civics 1 

Freehand Drawing 2 

Mechanical Drawing 1 

Electives .....""'. 2 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons: Two full years in the College 
of Liberal Arts in addition to the following high school courses: 

English 2 

Algebra .'l....: r . 1 

Plane Geometry "" ± 

German, or French !!!.*!.""!!!!"!!!" 2 

U. S. History and Civics ""..". 1 

Electives o 

The College of Law: Graduation from an accredited high school. 
The College of Dentistry: Graduation from an accredited high school. 
The College of Theology: 

(3) Th nh^f^ e ^ OU ^ Se: , T his course is for students who have 
obtained the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

(b) The Diploma Course: This course is for students who have 
the^equivalent of Junior standing in the College of Liberal 

The College of Pharmacy: The minimum requirement for entrance is 

eight units of high school work. 
The College of Oratory: 

(a) The schoS 10ma C ° Urse: Grad uation from an accredited high 

(b) Special Course: Confer with the dean of the College of 

Oratory concerning entrance. 
The College of Music: 

(3) ^soh^l 10 ™ C ° UrSe i : G^^ion from an accredited high 
school is required for graduation from the College of 
Music. No entrance requirements. 

(b) Special Course. Confer with the dean of the College of Music 
concerning entrance. s ■ HMC 

The College of Fine Arts: 

(a) The Teachers' Course, and courses leading to degrees- Grad- ' 

uation from an accredited high school. aegrees • Urad 

(b) SP Art C cZc^Wn?1ntra W n^. ** ^ ° f *? Co11 ^ ° f F ™ 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Registration Fee, a year, payable in advance $10 00 

(The registration fee is not refundable) 

Diploma Fee, payable 30 days before graduation 5.00 

Laboratory Fees, a semester: 

Biology (each course requiring laboratory work) 4 00 

S emistry I sioo 

c PhySlcs 4.00 

Students in Chemistry will deposit a breakage fee of $5.00 

which, less the cost of the goods broken, will be refunded 

at the close of the year. 



302 University of Southern California 

Room and board (except luncheon Monday to Friday) in 
the Women's Hall, one hundred and seven ^"'gW 
semester, payable in advance. A cash deposit of five dollars 
(IS 5 1 is required for the reservation of a room. Pupils are 
expected to furnish their own bed-linen. 

The University reserves the right to change any of the 
rates or discounts printed in this year book without notice. 

ROOMS AND BOARD 

Students are required to submit to the Faculty a statement 
of the Places where they desire to room and board, and must 
secure the consent of the Faculty in each case. 

Board and furnished rooms can be secured in .private al- 
lies at from five dollars to seven dollars a week Furnished 
rooms accommodating two students cost from eight to twelve 

d0 Oth S er a ex m p ens h es incident to school life vary with the habits 
and circumstances of the student. They are not of necessity, 
«o treat Ts to be burdensome to persons in moderate circum- 
stanes Tne instances have been extremely rare in which 
students of good ability and health have been compelled to 
leave the school for want of money. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

GROUP I: ENGLISH 

It is axiomatic that every one for the sake of cultivating 

a consistent habit of thinking, sh ^ be £?*£ * ° h ow to use 

bits of accurate description and simple ™™^e fa 

LlicTs^n^^^ 

It is also true that while o« = may become ^ respectable 
essayist, and some may be called upon i . hdr 

business and social correspondence. 

From these considerations, we are .led IJ ^ogWj^g 

interests of individual students. 



University High School + 303 

Method 

Among other important items the methods of instruction 
will involve the following list of particulars: 

An effort on the part of instructors to create real situations 
as a basis for real motives for effort in speaking and writing 

bpecial attention given to lessons in spelling, grammar, and 
the pronunciation of selected lists of words. 

Practice in the formal analysis of sentences, and in the con- 
struction of typical sentences and paragraphs. 
_ The student's constructive imagination to be guided by the 
simple formula upon which all objects in nature and art are 
constructed: purpose, plan, material, and method. 

Literature 

The following literary masterpieces for reading or inten- 
sive study include prose fiction, biography, ancient classics in 
translation, essays, drama, orations and arguments, selections 
irom American and English poetry. In class discussions 
stress is laid upon the thought and emotional content, with 
some attention to form and the aesthetical element. 

T5 **%£ £ e f r ; Sandwick and Bacon's "High School Word 
£?£ l> ? American Stories"; Three Narrative Poems: 

Ine Rime of the Ancient Mariner", "Sohrab and Rustum", 
Enoch Arden'; Malory's "Morte d'Arthur"; "Old Testa- 
ment Stones '; Law's "Selections from American Poetry"; 
Smith s "Short Stories Old and New." 

Second Year. Sandwick and Bacon's "High School Word 
Book ; f Moultons "Short Stories"; Eliot's "Silas Marner"; 
Homers Odyssey"; Hale's "American Essays"; Virgil's 
Aeneid ; Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice.' 

Third Year. Brewer's "Oral English"; Ashmun's "Mod- 
"Tt, t/u an 2 F oe £r. y for Secon <*ary Schools"; Tennyson's 
The Idylls of the King"; Pace's "American Literature with 
Readings ; Shakespeare's "Macbeth." 

t .f ou f th J e *F' . Brewer's "Oral English"; Long's "English 
Literature ; Swinton's "Studies in English Literature." 

Oral English 

First Year First Semester. Principles of voice building- 
breathing, relaxation, and tone placement. Phonetics. Enum- 
eration. Beginning of common reading. Second Semester. 
Continuation of technique as in first semester. Interpreta- 
tion of selections in "Cumnock Reader." 

(Note: The course in First Year Oral English is required 
of all first year students.) 



304 University of Southern California 

Second Year First Semester. Continuation of technique 
andta&rStive reading offered in First Year Oral Eng h. 
Beginning of "t^^^"^^^ •fficTReJdS^ 
s'condVeml sTe^TalJon "cS. public questions. Begin- 
nfng of argumentation in extemporaneous speaking and de- 
bating. 

GROUP H-: FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

(a) FRENCH 

TTir^t Year This course comprises a study of the essen- 
tial o Jrench grammar, and reading from easy French with 
especial attention given to pronundahon and ^ tc .the us of 

^r "f^C^ 'et la 

Patrie"; Weill's "Historical French Reader. 

c»^«r>^ Vear This course includes a review and continua- 

Ha"evy's "L'abbe Constantin"; Dumas' "La Tul.pe Noire. 
(b) GERMAN 



First Year. The course in First Year German comprises 

translation and memorizing. Texts: Moshe -and I Jenney 
"Lern und Lesebuch"; Spyn's "Mom der Geissbub. 

o a v„r TVip grammar is finished and reviewed. 

produced, botlr orally and in the lorm 01 d the 

Sought* in spoken, and wr.tt.n <*"»»». K^rt «D« 

"Das Kalte Herz." 

(c) GREEK 

Courses in Greek may be elected by third or fourth year 
students. 

First Year. Elementary Greek. A thorough drill in form. 

?| spaa s^ArBSp-sr^* '-• 

mentary Greek." 



University High School 305 

Second Year. Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I-IV. Prac- 
tice in sight reading. Oral and written prose composition 
based on the text. Texts: Goodwin and White's "Xeno- 
phons Anabasis"; Goodwin's "Greek Grammar"; Pearson's 
Greek Prose Composition." 

(d) LATIN 

First Year. The aim of the first year's work is to attain 
an accurate pronunciation, a thorough knowledge of forms 
and the simpler principles of syntax, and a vocabularly of 
about eight hundred common words. Text: Smith's "Latin 
Lessons." * 

Second Year. Selections from easy Latin prose, particu- 
larly Caesar s Gallic War. A thorough review of forms and 
a systematic study of syntax. Regular practice in oral or 
written translation into Latin, and in sight reading. Text- 
Riess and James' "Caesar's Gallic War"; combined with 
Summary of Forms and Syntax, Prose Composition, and 
sight Readings. 

Third Yean Cicero, six orations. Oral or written prose 
composition based on the text. An attempt is made to gain 
some definite knowledge of Cicero and his Age, of the meth- 
ods of government in Cicero's time, and of the city of Rome 
Texts: DOoge's "Select Orations of Cicero"; D'Ooge's 
Latin Composition"; Allen and Greenough's "Latin Gram- 



mar. 



Fourth Year. Virgil's Aeneid, Books I-IV. A special 
eitort is made to approach the work as poetry, and the read- 
ing of the Latin is duly emphasized. During the first semes- 
ter two days each week are given to a review of syntax and 

«w- pr -« Se A COm P.° slti A ,?' Texts: Fairclough and Brown's 
Virgil s Aeneid ; Allen and Greenough's "Latin Grammar." 

(e) SPANISH 

First Year. The attainment of a correct pronunciation, a 
knowledge of the fundamentals of Spanish grammar, and 
the ability to converse in simple Spanish. Such texts as 
Worman s First Spanish Reader", Harrison's "Elementary 
Spanish Reader" and Espinosa and Allen's "A Spanish Gram- 
mar. 

Second Year. Advanced Reading, grammar and conversa- 
tion. Such^ texts as Hill's "Spanish Tales for Beginners", 
Crawford s Spanish Composition", Carrion and Aza's "Zara- 
gueta and Espinosa and Allen's "A Spanish Grammar " 



306 University of Southern California 

GROUP HI. HISTORY 

courses in this department. 

Through the reign of Constantine. Text. Wests lne a 
cient World." 

Second Year. Mediaeval and Modern History This 
coursed open to all students who .have :« .mplet ed f Ancient 
History. First Semester From ^ J 6 Semester From the 
"Discovery of America.;' Second Semester, rro 
"Reformation" to the "Napoleonic Era. lext. my 
Mediaeval and Modern History. 

Third Year. English History. ^This course i&^ChS 

Text: Cheney's "A Short History of England. 

Fourth Year. United . States History and Civics. Pri- 
marily for students registered in the fourth f year. * |_ 
Semester. Six parts of the teg completed From ^e BJ, 
tablishment of the- Eng sh ^S^Xond Semester 
Text: Muzzeys . American msiuiy. « T t , p or . 

The text-book on civil government completed. Text, for 
man's "The American Republic." 

GROUP IV: MATHEMATICS 
The aim of the course in Mathematics is to cultivate the 
haSs. of^Sepe^^^ etX^on^lnd 

is the intellectual training that makes the mind a re any 
keen tool; second, the order ly acquisition o fac^ A ^ 
lute thoroughness and work that increases in am 
difficulty with the students increasing capacity are req 
The student's efficiency is measured by/'\ t P ™^ in \ tions 
Throughout the course written reviews and test exanunauo 

are frequent. 



University High School 307 

First Year. Elementary Algebra. The object of the study 
is not only to acquire a knowledge of the subjects required 
for admission to the leading universities, but to secure the 
mental discipline for its own sake, and such a drill as looks 
to the use of the algebraic method in future study. Special 
emphasis is placed on factoring and on the solution of equa- 
tions. Text: Wentworth's "New School Algebra." 

Second Year. Advanced Algebra. Elementary Algebra is 
reviewed thoroughly. A careful study is made of the follow- 
ing subjects: Theory of Quadratics, Simultaneous Quad- 
ratics Progressions, Mathematical Induction, Binomial The- 
orem for Positive Integral Exponents, Inequalities, Variables 
and Limits, Imaginary and Complex Numbers, Determinants 
Iheory of Equations, Solution of Higher Equations, Logar- 
ithms. Text: Schultze's "Advanced Algebra." 

Third Year. Plane Geometry. Careful attention is given 
to construction, to clear and logical expression, and above 
all to the attainment of the power to do original work in 
geometry. The exercises of the text-book are supplemented 
by constant suggestions by the teacher for investigations 
lext: Wentworth's "Plane Geometry." 

Fouth Year. First Semester. Solid Geometry. A study 
ot the fundamental propositions of the Euclidean geometry of 
space Text: Wentworth's "Plane and Solid Geometry" 
Second Semester. Trigonometry. Plane trigonometry and 
its applications, the trigonometry of the right spherical tri- 
angle, and logarithms. Text: Palmer and Leigh's "Plane 
Trigonometry with Tables." 

GROUP V: SCIENCE 

First Year. General Science. The course in General Sci- 
ence is intended primarily for first year students. It serves 
as an introduction to the particular sciences of the later 
years of the high school course. By means of recitations 
experimental demonstrations and the study of the text the 
student is made familiar with the simple yet fundamental 
tacts ot the various sciences and is given a basis for the 
intelligent selection of a science to meet the science require- 
ments for graduation. Text: Snyder's "First Year Science." 

Second Year Botany. An elementary study of plant life, 
lne work in Botany is a combination of laboratory study 
garden practice, recitations, and field trips, with a careful 
notebook record of the work actually done by the student 
under the direction of the instructor. Text: Andrews' "Prac- 
tical Course in Botany." 



308 University of Southern California 

a v.,r 7nolotrv An elementary study of animal 
ImS"™. wo k I a combi^tion of laboratory study, lec- 
hfe. 1 his worK is a recitations, with a careful 

tures, occasional fie J trips and ec ^ under the 

notebook record of the work done oy d K u > s 

direction of the instructor. Texts. V nvl '^/ K ,, , f. A 
-Text Book of General Zoology"; Linville and Kelly s 
Guide Tor Laboratory and Field Work in Zoology. 

ttft^^/f^SZ couS ScK: 

ffi* Ke e rs S o°n SSM «ry Exercises 
^Arranged to Accompany 'First Course. 

Fourth Year. Elementary Physics. th*Wieto*h^»ca 
is F d eSne^to make the *ft*g%jft &gSS 
facts laws and ^ theories of ^y labo-tory work. Texts: 
ffi^cS^^Vca^; Coleman's 
"Revised Laboratory Manual." 

GROUP VI: ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

The courses outlined below are open to third and fourth 
year students only. 

Third Year First Semester. Industrial History. A 

T r.! ; S «n S 2«« C»«Sl Geography. An .to- 
r„n C .riS ' Tex," R™i„so„'s y »A Commercial Geography 

tion of Wealth, the Theory of Exchange my Reye _ 

Monopolies, International Trade, and ^ver „ 

nues and Expenditures. Text Ely and vvic 
mentary Principles of Economics (Revised) beco 

Progress." 



University High School 309 

GROUP VII: ART AND DRAWING 

Fine and Applied Art 

Freehand Drawing. First Semester. The mechanical 
principles of Freehand Drawing. Elementary work in pend 
and charcoal from geometrical solids, casts and materia 
Objects; still hfe in pastel. Second Semester. Dra win? from 

cTa-ld colors 6 '" "**" COl ° r; ° Ut ° f d °° r sketchi "g in S 

Basketry The essentials of reed work, including the 
weaving of baskets and trays and the dyeing and finfshin* 
of reed baskets and furnishings; the weaving of baskets from 
native materials. (y 2 unit for year's work) - 

H^i a3 V M0dd i in * This , course deludes designing, building 
decorating, glazing and firing pottery such Is ties, bowl!' 

Jfaster J casts " m ° de ' ing fra ^ ments of ornament from 

Drawing 
Mechanical Drawing. First Semester. The use and care 
°J ™t™nents;Jettering; geometrical problems; simple 
orthographic projection; working drawing. Second SemeTter 
Lettering; mathematical curves including conic secdons b- 
O ro?ec£n. and dev elopment of surfaces; isometric and oblique 
projection; simple perspective; working drawings. 

h a S C cw e i? ra T n *. Dr ™ in S oi si mple machine parts; free 
hand sketches; detail and assembly drawings of existing m 
chinery; tracing and blue printing. existing ma 

Architectural Drawing. Lettering; large scale detail* nf 

man a dw U en, e n le T ntS ° f ^ ldingS; plans ^"devatloS of°a 
small dwelling house; elementary architectural rendering. 

GROUP VIII: PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

•^ ema u i u ,? laSS , Work - This consists of vigorous drill 
with dumb-bells, clubs, bar-bells, etc., for the boys for the 
g.rls, s general development exercises in walkingand 'running! 

Progressive graded work on various pieces of gymnastic 
apparatus mat work, and gymnastic games for the boTs free 
movements, relaxing exercises, mat work, walking drifl' and 
dumbbells and games in the open air for the girls 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



several classes 
men; Sp., Special. 

Abberley, Louise (F.) Los Angeles 

Warns, Edith (S.) Los Ange es 

Adams Egbert (S.) Los Ange es 

Adams Mary (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Aoams Reatha Gladys (F, Ventura 

A^ms Romola M. (Sp.)-Xong Beach 
Adkinson, Kath. W. (Sr.). . Los Ange es 

Agor, Bessie (Sp.) .Xos Ange es 

Ahrens, Hazel Viola (Sr.)-.Los Ange es 
Ahrens, Lyleworth F. (F.).Xos Ange es 

Aiken, Doris Isabel (J.) Los Ange es 

A ber, Roberta F. (Sr.)-Xos Angeles 
Aldahl Mertice R. (Sp.) ....Long Beach 

Alderson, Harriet (S.) Long Beach 

Alexander, Evalyn V. (J.) Los Ange es 
Alexander, Gross W. (Sp.). -Los Ange es 
Alexander, Willard B. (S.) Xos Ange es 
Alfred, Helen Lillian (Sp.).Xos Ange es 

Allen/Gladys (Sp.) L °?^ nge ' eS 

Allen Marie (J.) --Alha mbra 

Allen Olive D. (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Allen Phebe (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Allen Tru (F.) Los Ange es 

Allen Willis Warren (J.).Xos Angeles 
Alvord, Grace Lucile (Sr.)Xos Ange es 
Amestoy, Juanita (S.)- -Los Angeles 

Amidon, Beulah McH. (Sp.) - - 

Los Angeles 

AmidonT Charles "C. <J.)— Los Angeles 
Amidon, Oak McH. (F.). -Los Angeles 
Andersen, Norman E. (?&■-»•««* 

Anderson, Blanche Alice (r ) Mare 

Anderson, Cora I. (S.) Los Angeles 

Andrews, Paul Gould (F.) -Pasadena 
Ankrum, Morris W. (Sp.). Xos Angeles 
Arata, Winfield H. (S.) San Luis Obispo 
Ardis, Atticus Haygood (F.).. ..Downey 
Arkley, William Harry (F.)-Xompoc 

Armor, Eunice Elnear (F.) Hughson 

Armstrong, Frank T. (F).. Los Angeles 

Armstrong, Robby J. (F. Santa Ana 

Ashmore, Edythe F. (Sp)..-. Pasadena 
Askin, John Morgan (S.). ...Los Ange es 
Austin, Beatrice E. (Sp.). -Xos Ange es 
Avery, Helen C. (S.) Los Angeles 



Barnes, 
Barnes, 
Barnett, 



Bacon, Marion N. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Bailey, H. Morle (F.) Marten, la 

Bailey, Katherine (Sp.) Long Beach 

Bailey, R. K. (Sp.) Pasadena 

Bailie, Ruth Mbrris (J.)-Xos Angeles 

Baker, Ben Byrd (J.) -- M ™'»™ 

Baker, Harold E. (F.) ^akersfie d 

Baker, Laurel Boyd (F.)--Bakersfield 
Bainbridge, Eulalia (S.)----.--Cov.na 
Bainbridge, Helen Gould (F.).Cov.na 
Baldwin, L. J. (Sp.)-.--,- Xos Angeles 

Ball, Alice (F.)... B.g Pme Wyo. 

Barcome, Glenfield E. (S.). Xos Angeles 
Bare, Mary M. (F.)-.Huntmgton Park 

Barker, Eula Mary (Sr.)- Burbank 

Barker, Harriet H. (Sr.) -Xos Angeles 

Barlow, Genevieve (Sr.) - Gardena 

Barnes, Mrs. F. V. (Sp.).. Xos Angeles 

Jessie B. (Sr.) Long Beach 

Ruth A. (Sp.) : Orange 

Mary A. (J.) Long Beach 

Ba'r'reV Myrtle Ann (Sp.)... Xos Angeles 

Beale, John Paul (F.) ^° m ° na 

Beam Verna Frances (S.)-..-.WJi.ttier 

Beardsley, Oda M. (F.) .Mesa Am 

Beaudry, Mary B. (J.) Los Angeles 

Becker, Eunice Gertrude (F)"Covma 

Bedford, Stephen (J.) -■- R ? U "* S , 

Beebe, Raymond L. (S.) Los Angele 

Beed, George (S.) ■• ^J 

Bell, Earl Vaughn (F.).- Xos Ange es 
Benedict, Florence M. (F.).Xos Angeles 

Bennett, Bessie P. (Sp.) ?/™ de ™ 

Bennett Gladys A. (S.),Red»do Beach 
Besselo, Catherine L. (J.) -Eagle Rock 
Be s, George Alfred (S.)-Xos Angeles 

Beven, George H. (S.) ; ..Escondido 

Beyl, Charles Merwyn (J.). Xos Angeles 
Bickenbach, Clara S. (Sp.).Xos Angeles 
Biedermann, H. H. (Sp.)-Xos Ange es 

Bird, Carol (F.) Los Aug e es 

Bird Richard F. (F.) Los Ange e 

Bissdl, Mrs. J. J. (Sp.) L ° S lrjes 

Bissiri, Alfio (S.) • Los ^" 

Bissiri, Amelia (J.) Los Angeles 



Catalogue of Students 



311 



Blackinton, Fred S. (F.).... Los Angeles 

Blair, Motts (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Blake, John Philips (S.) Los Angeles 

Blake, Mabel Ann (F.) Pasadena 

Blake, Ruth (F.) Los Angeles 

Blakemore, Wm. M. (Sp.) Glendale 

Blakeslee, Harold C. (S.)..Los Angeles 

Bland, Adelina (S.) Los Angeles 

Bland, H. Maud (J.) Los Angeles 

Bloom, Selma T. (J.) Los Angeles 

Bly, Alvin Paul (S.) Los Angeles 

Boice, Maude Vivian (Sr.).. Los Angeles 

Boice, Stella (J.) Los Angeles 

Bonebreak, Lucile H. (S.)....Hollywood 

Boor, Edith (J.) Los Angeles 

Borgerding, Martha (F.)-.-Los Angeles 
Bose, Roy George (J.). .Burlington, Wis. 

Bouchier, Margaret (S.) Los Angeles 

Bowen, Frederick W. (Sr.)-Verda, La 

Bowen, Mary S. (Sr.)... Los Angeles 

Bowen, Catherinebell J. (S.)..Alhambra 

Bower, Carlyle (Sp.) Topeka, Kas. 

Bower, Florence M. (Sp.).. Los Angeles 

Bowles, Isabelle C. (F.) Hollywood 

Boyd, Walter H, (F.).. Twin Falls, Ida 
Braden, William W. (F.)..Santa Monica 
Bradley, Gertrude M. (S.)..Los Angeles 

Bradley, Millie Parsons (J.) Venice 

Brady, Armand A. (F.) Weaverville 

Braun, Helena Elizabeth (Sr.)..Glendale 

Brewer, Louise (F.) _ Pasadena 

Brewster, Harold Leland (Sr.)... Fresno 

Bridge, David Alex. (Sr.) Pasadena 

Bridges, Mae D. (Sp.) Pasadena 

Bnggs, Howard (Sr.) Santa Monica 

Briggs, Marie (S.) Santa Ana 

Bnte, Ruby (J.) Bakcrsfield 

Britton, Anna Ethel (J.) Venice 

Bntton, Harley Howard (F.) Venice 

Brockman, Kenneth P. (F.).. Los Angeles 

Brokaw, Lana Eliz. (Sp.) Santa Ana 

Broker, Russell M. (F.) Los Angeles 

Brown, Beryl (S.) Whittier 

Brown, Clara Geneva (Sp.).. ..Santa Ana 

Brown, Faye (S.) Whittier 

Brown, Geneva (Sr.) Sierra Madre 

Brown, Jesse W. (F.) Los Angeles 

Brown, Marguerite K. (Sp.)Los Angeles 
Brown, Marjorie M. (Sr.)..Los Angeles 
Brown, Sarah F. (Sr.)..Huntington Pk 
Brownell, Giles Corlis (J.)..Los Angeles 
Brubaker, Harriet M. (Sr.)..Los Angeles 
Brubaker, Martha M. (J.)....Los Angeles 

Bruce, Grace Edna (F.) Hemet 

Bruce, Henry W. (S.) Amherst, O. 

Bryant, Carolyn (F.) Los Angeles 

Bryant, Gardner W. (F.)....Los Angeles 



Bryant, Olive Marie (S.).... Erie 111 

Bryson, John A. (Sr.) Downey 

Buchanan, Thomas P. (F.)..Tobe, Colo 
Buffum, Russell Jones (S.)..Long Beach 
Bulfinch, Mildred G. (S.)..Los Angeles 

Bullock, Albert E. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Bullock, Fredk. W. (S.)Redondo Beach 
Burdick, Earl Kirkwood (S.)..Santa Ana 

Burgaize, Wilfred (S.) Santa Monica 

Burge, Alice (J.) Santa Ana 

Burgess, Myrtle L. (S.) Los Angeles 

Burk, Phyllis Clark (J.)..Boulder, Colo 
Burke, Villa Marie (Sp.)....Los Angeles 
Burnight, Ruth Eliz. (Sr.)..Los Angeles 

Burns, Daisy M. (S.) Long Beach 

Burns, Phil Sheridan (Sr.)-Los Angeles 
Burns, Margaret J. (F.) Huntington Pk 

Burson, Sara Louise (F.) Fillmore 

Burson, William W. (F.)....Chicago, 111 

Burton, Helen (S.) Los Angeles 

Burton Sarah (J.) Los Angeles 

Butterneld, Clarence U. (S.) Chino 

Butterfleld, Howard L. (S.) Chino 

Butters, Archibald D. (J.)..Long Beach 
Butterworth, H. H. (F.)...Xos Angeles 

Button, Adeline Lily (F.) Colton 

Byerly, Perry, Jr. (S.) Duarte 

Byerts, Nettie (S.) San Pedro 

Byrne, Loretta P. (Sr.).. Pittsburg, Pa. 
Cahalan Gertrude E. (S.)-.Los Angeles 
Cakms, Lorna Ruth (J.):...Los Angeles 
Callaway, Ezra Samuel (S.)..Orion, 111. 

Campbell Roy S. (S.) Los Angeles 

Canniff Edith Alice (Sp.) Pasadena 

? r , , k ' £ harleS B ' (Sr -> Pasadena 

Carkeek, Mrs. Ruth R. (Sr.).. Pasadena 
Carleton, Harold A. R. (S.)..Hollywood 
Carpenter Clara I. (Sp.)....S. Pasadena 

Carr, Ira Cloyd (F.) Calexico 

Carnck Edna (S.) Roseburg, Ore. 

Carter, Dorothy E. (J.) Los Angeles 

Care r , l E (gp } Los A j 

Car twnght, Alice (Sp.) Lankershim 

Cartwnght, Nellie M. (J.)..Lankershim 

rT^i Ch A adeS W ' (S - } L °s Angeles 

Catudal, Annette E. (Sr.).Xos Angeles 
Cauley, Henry J. (Sp.)....San Francisco 
Cereghino, Manuel J. (J.). .Los Angeles 
Cereghmo Wm. F. (Sr.)....Los Angeles 
Cerveny Leona L. (Sp.)....Los Angeles 

Cervi Armando (F.) Los Angeles 

Chamber am, Clark (J.) Loma, N. D 

Chamberlain, Edw. J. (Sr.).Xos Angeles 
Chambers Constance E.(S.)..Hollywood 

Chandler, M. W. (S.) Glendale 

Chapman, Grace (F.) C ovina 

Chapman, Robert J. (F.).-.Xos Angeles 



312 



University of Southern California 



Chappell, K. T. (F.)..Bellingham,Wash. 
&', Ellsworth D (S.)-.Los Angdes 

Chase Florence Zoe (Sr.) Berkeley 

Chase Gladys (J.) T Los A " ge f. 

Chase Vera A. (Sr.) Los Ange es 

Cheek Bertha (J.) Los Angeles 

Chemberlen, Frederick T. (Sp-^Co-na 

Chesnut, Robert (S.) Redlands 

Choate, Dorothy (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Chrisman, Edna G. (S.) Los Ange es 

C San en, H. D. (S.)-Los Ange es 
Chris ensen, Sereno (Sp.)..- Los Angeles 
Clapsaddle, Wm. A. (F.)-Los Angeles 

Clare Minnie B. (S.) San D.ego 

Clarey, H. Donald (F.) Inglewood 

C,ark" Anna M. (Sp ) Los Angeles 

Clark, Emraett (Sr.) .....Pomona 

Clark Jessie L. (J.) Los Ange es 

?-, it T i Sr 1 Los Angeles 

£•* hJh) El Centre 

Clayton, A. H. (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Clemen , Jere Joseph (S.). .Los Ange es 
Senen Clarence (F )-Los Angeles 

Cleveland, Hazel E. (S.) ...Boise, Ida. 

Coates, Emily Lee (Sp.) -Los Angeles 

Cochran, Mabel E. (Sp.)..... San Jose 

Cochrane, Faye L. (F.) Los Angeles 

Coggeshall, S. L. (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Colborn, Kenneth L. (S.).. Los Angeles 

Co born Maude Nellie (S.) -Upland 

Coleman, Cora E. (Sp.) Los Ange es 

ColUns, Ernest Mack (F).Xos Angeles 
Collins Gracebel T. (Sp.)..Beverly Hills 
Comb Irene Leanora (S.) Hollywood 
Comstock, Marion H. (Sp.). .Los Angeles 

Conger, Charles C(F) Inglewood 

Conger, Genevieve (J.) -- - ulm: 

Conn, Mae Elizabeth (S.).. Los Angeles 
Conrey, Justine Clara (F.)..Los Angeles 
Conrey Lucile Eliz. (F.).-Los Ange es 

Constant, Claribel (S.) Los Ange es 

Confrere Matthew A. (F.) Calex.co 

Cook, Fern F. (S.) - Ontario 

Cooke, Lee F. (S.) Long Beach 

Cooke Willard H. (F.). Ralston, la 
Cooney, Katherine (Sp.)-Los Angeles 
Cooper Grace Van P. (F.)-Long Beach 

Cooper, Paul J. (S.) Turlock 

Copeland, John Drew (L>"""~:; Rlv " a 
Copps, Rufus James (F.. .Hollywood 
Cordes, Herbert Albert 0-)--. S f nta T A ^ 

Core, Helena (S.) Bare.Uy India 

Coryell, Gladys A. (F.) Los Ange es 

Couch/Esther Tanner (J.).-Los Ange es 
Couch, Lina Rider (Sp.).. ..Los Ange es 
Cowan, Estelle A. (Sp.) Los Angeles 



Cowan, Rose Ellen (Sp.).. -Los Ange es 

Cox, J. Cecil (J.) Los Ange es 

Crandall, Edw. A. (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Crandall, Jessie Ruth (S.).. Los Angeles 
Crandall, Marian F. (F.) -Santa Mana 

Crane, Harold T. (F.) Los Ange es 

Crane, Walter B. (J.) Los Angeles 

Crary, Ora (S.) Los Ange es 

Crayne, lone Rebecca (F.) -Los Ange es 

Cripe S. O. (S.) Los Angeles 

Crittenden, Laura T. (S.) San Diego 

Croke Annie Pauline (F). Wtatier 

Crookshanks, Sara A, (S.)-Los Ange es 

Crosby, Lucy E. (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Crowther, Rhea (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Crumley, Margaret S. (J.). .Los Angeles 

Culp, Allice Bessie (F.) Fillmore 

Culver, Edward H. (F.) Los Ange es 

Cunningham, Mary A. (S.) -Los Ange es 

Curran, Fred S. (F.) —Los Ange es 

Curtis, Eleanor G. (Sp.). -Los Ange es 
Daggett, Lowell S. (Sp.).... Los Angeles 

Dahlgren, Roland W. (S.).. -Fresno 

Dalland, Augustine (Sp.). -Los Angeles 

Dallas, Donald A. (F.) -BrynMawr 

Dambach, Leo (F.) Los Ange es 

Damrell, Mary H. (J.) Los Ange es 

Daniels, Charline C. (F.)-Los Ange es 
Darhanian, Arra A. (F.)-Los Ange es 
Darin, Vernie Hazel (Sp.)-Los Ange es 
Dashiell, James R. (Sp.)-Los Angeles 

Dau, Neils J. (F.) - -Fresno 

Davenport, Helen S. (S.).-Los Ange es 
Davenport, Marjorie (J.). ...Los Angeles 

Davis, Bessie Lota (J.) - .--Selma 

Davis, Earl D. (Sr.) Los Angele s 

Davis, Mildred W. (F.) Hollywood 

Day, Alice Helen (J.) ...Pasadena 

Del;, Charles Franklin (F.). -,Ca ex.cd 
Dean, Margaret Lucret.a (F).. Calex.co 
DeArmond, Zolo R. (Sr.)-Los Angeles 

Denend, Alta M. (Sp.) Long Beach 

Dennis, Alice R. (Sr.)- Los Angeles 

Dennis, Marie June (F.) r -0™f* 

Denton, Lucrezia H.(F.)Huntmgton Pk 

DeRackin, Margaret (F ) Lmper.al 

DeVault, Nellie M. (Sp.). -Los Ange es 
Dickson, Lucile Eliz. (J.).. Los Angeles 

Dill, Hayward W. (F.) Long Beach 

Dillenback, Ruth (J.) -;" Alham, f ! 

Dirlam, Clyde W. (F.) Los Ange es 

Diven, Lulu S. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Dodson, Ellen MacK. (J J-.-Rtverside 

Dodson, Ynez Reyes. (F.) San Pedro 

Doescher, Paul (S.) .--• An ahem 

■n„i» Fv» fT 1 Los Angeles 

Dolky Loi/'Evelyn (Sr.)..Los Angeles 



Catalogue of Students 



313 



Donohue, Donald J. (F.)....Los Angeles 
Doolan Winifred C. (Sp.).Xos Angeles 

Double, Helen (F.) Los Angeles 

Dougherty, Marjorie P. (F.)..Pasadena 
Douglas, Maud Elvina (J.). .Los Angeles 
Douglass Robert H. (J.).-Los Angeles 
Dower, Florence M. (S.)....Long Beach 
Dowey, John Sinclair (F.)..Belfast, Ire 

n° y ! e ' I' R V T ( ? P ' ) Los Angeles 

Doyle Sue (J.) Los A , es 

Drill, Anna D. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Duffy, Elsie E. (Sp.) San Pedro 

Dunham Pearl B. (F.) Los Angeles 

Dun ap, Raymond B. (Sr.).Xos Angeles 

Dunlavy, Wm. P. (F.) -Trinidad, Colo. 

Durham, Mrs. L. E. (Sp.)....Pasadena 

Durham, Lewis Earl (Sr.) Pasadena 

n U ; e ', R l th T ' < Sr ->-~Santa Barbara 

Durnford, Beulah Sabina. (F.) 

~ ; Richland Center, Wis. 

Dutcher Arthur R. (F.) Montebello 

Dutton Mrs. Lilla R. (Sp.).. Los Angeles 

fUI' f ran , GeS ,c P \ (J) Los Angeles 

f2 ' ^ if (SJ Los Angeles 

Edwards, Flora (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Edwards, Grace M. (S) Hollister 

Edwards, Raymond (S) Los Angeles 

Eggenberger, Emma (Sp.)-Los Angeles 
Ehrenclou, Sigrid (F.) Los Angeles 

Fir' 11 ' J U ?f n L - * (Sp - } Milwaukee 

Elis, M Ruth (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Elming, Ima Clara (F.)....Wayne, Neb. 

Emery, Alton T. (S.) Salinas 

F^^'p ay J arl (Jr - } Fullerton 

Fn T' / Hen o 7 (Sp - } Los Angeles 

Epstein, Joan (S.) Los Angeles 

Erb, Maud Winifred (S.)..Los Angeles 

Erwin, Ruth Cleophas (J.) 

Fr -\- ": West T erre 'Haute,"*I n d. 

E Z m \ i 0r T nCe B ' (J) Alhambra 

Fvl ' ^ U i-\ J ^ nette < F -)-Los Angeles 

Evans, Ruthetta M. (J.) Los Angeles 

f7T J \^ ndrew < Sr -) Pasadena 

Fancher, Marieta D. (Sp.)..Los Angeles 
F^r W T, u° Ik (F ' } Be verly Hills 

Earlow, Gladys Ellen (F.).. Los Angeles 
Earnngton, Desmond (F.) . 

P "," *,";■;:;'" ^ an Bernardino 

Feeler, Wi ham Henry (Sr.)....Holtville 

Feerrar, Gladys (F.) Los Angeles 

Feltham, Dorothy E. (Sr.) Pasadena 

'erf U F 0n ', Ca ;/ ie . H - (Sr '>-Los Angeles 

E/^ Ma ,V Ida < Sr -) San Pedro 

£ d ' W t 1 ^ W - (S.) Los Angeles 

Elmore, Gladys Effa (F.) Gardena 



Fink, Georgia S. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Fisher, Edward Merle (F.).. Long Beach 
Fisher, Raymond H. (F.).. Los Angeles 

Fitch, Katharine (S.) Los Angeles 

Fleming, Elton F. (S.) Los Angeles 

Fletcher, Abbie N. (Sp.)....Los Angeles 

Fletcher, Helen F. (S.) Los Angeles 

Flewelling, Cecil (S.) Los Angeles 

Forbes, Catherine J. (F.)..Los Angeles 

Fossett, Anna L. (S.) Hemet 

Foster, Emma Viola (S.) Pasadena 

Foster, Mrs. R. A. (Sp.)....Los Angeles 

Fowler, Edna H. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Fowler, Esther. Eliz. (Sr.).. Los Angeles 
Fowler, Mildred Aileen (Sr.)..Glendale 
Fox, Mrs. Belle H. (Sp.)....Los Angeles 
Francis, Lillias D. (Sp.)....Los Angeles 
Frasch, Ruby L. (F.)....New York City 
Frazier, Edna Alice (Sp.).. Los Angeles 
Fredericks, Agatha (Sr.)....Los Angeles 

Freed, Morris (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Freeman, Mabel N. (S.) Los Angeles 

Freeman, C. Wesley (F.).... Riverside 

Frew, Helen Fern (S.) Tulare 

Frew, Myron H. (F.) Tulare 

Frey, Bert (F.) Huntington Park 

Freydberg, Esther (Sr.) Hollywood 

Fry, Ina Blanch (Sp.) Logan, la 

Fuller, Georgette Ellen (F.) 

_ •" " : Olympia, Wash. 

Fuller, Ruby Esther (F.) Pasadena 

Fulton, Hortense (J.) Pasadena 

Funk, Velma A. (F.) Los Angeles 

Ga lagher, Joe James (F.) Imperial 

Galloway, Amor S. (F.)....Los Angeles 
Galloway, Harold H. (F.)..Los Angeles 

Gallup, Luke L. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Gansner, William George (J.)....Colton 

Gant, M »™ (Sp.) Long Beach 

Gardner, Gladys Bell (F Ontario 

Garner, George W. (F.) Los Angeles 

Garner, Lloyd H. (F.) Los Angeles 

Gates, Eugene S. (F.) Hollywood 

Geary, Inez Eliz. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Geek, Mrs. Edith E. (Sp.)..Burley, Ida. 

Geiger, Essie (S.) Los Angeles 

George, Noel Ferrin (J.).... Los Angeles 
Geyer, Dorothy Lucile (F.).. Santa Ana 

n*l*' ™ bm D - (S - } Long Beach 

Giffen, Marguerite N. (S.)..Los Angeles 

Gilbert, Hazel J. (Sr.) Pasadena 

Gilmor, Gertrude V. (F.)....Los Angeles 
Gison, Bessie L. R. (Sr.).. Los Angeles 
GUson, Richard W. (F.)....Los Angeles 

Glasgow, Sam C. (F.) Medford, Ore. 

Glassick, William B. (F.).Xos Angeles 
Gleiss, Esther Grace (F.)....Los Angeles 



314 



University of Southern California 



Gleiss, Gladys I. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Glick, Annette (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Glidden, Mira J. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Goetz, Margaret Josephine (Sr.).. Venice 
Goldsbrough, Maleeta (S.).. Los Angeles 

Goodell, Percy W. (S.) Los Angeles 

Groman, Anna B. (Sp.) Hollywood 

Goodman, Wm. E. (F.).. Hartford, Conn. 

Goodrich, Clarence E. (F.) Hemet 

Goodrich, Elmer E. (F.).... Los Angeles 
Goodson, Mabel Blane (F.).. Los Angeles 

Ghormley, Mrs. H. (S.) Los Angeles 

Gould, Roscoe (S.)_. Los Angeles 

Grace, Bernice Madeline (S.)... .Gardena 
Graham, J. Estelle (Sp.).... Los Angeles 

Grant, Helen (F.) Los Angeles 

Grantham, Louise B. (F.).. Los Angeles 

Gray, Helen S. (Sp.) Long Beach 

Gray, L. Belle (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Gray, Mabel T. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Green, Arthur Myrle (Sp.)--'-El Monte 

Green, Jeannette (S. )..... Los Angeles 

Greenleaf, Lucile (S.) Los Angeles 

Griffin, Harry E. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Griffith, Margaret (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Grinnell, George H. (S.).... Los Angeles 
Groves, Mary Olive (Sp.)....Los Angeles 
Grua, Clifford Perry (Sr.)..S. Pasadena 

Grua, Esther Salma (S.) S. Pasadena 

Gunning, Alma E. (Sr'.) Los Angeles 

Gustafson, Axel W. (S.)....Los Angeles 

Haber, Phil Fred (F.) Los Angeles 

Haberman, Samuel J. (S.).. Los Angeles 

Haddock, Nellie (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Hadley, Carl McCoy (F.).... Los Angeles 
Haight, Raymond L. (J.).. ..Los Angeles 
Halbert, Frances M. (F.)....Long Beach 

Halbert, Rachel (F.) Long Beach 

Halcomb, Marie Y. (S.) Los Angeles 

Hall, Harry L. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Hallrock, Anna K. (Sp.)... .Los Angeles 
Hamilton, Harold P. (F.). ...Hollywood 
Hamilton, May Irene (F.).. Los Angeles 

Hamilton, W. Wright (S.) Upland 

Hammond, Leta V. (S.) Los Angeles 

Hammond, Mrs. Maud W. (Sr.) 

Los Angeles 

Handy, Martha P. (S.) Long Beach 

Handy, Truman B. (J.) Los Angeles 

Hannum, Hortense Laura (S.)..Calexico 
Hardy, Sophie Edwina (Sp.) Santa Ana 

Hargis, Helen E. (J.) Hollywood 

Harkness, Elizabeth J. (Sp.).. Pasadena 

Harman, Frank Walworth (F.) 

Mound City, Mo. 

Harris, Gladys Reo (Sr.) Pasadena 

Harris, Nelson M. (F.) Los Angeles 



Harrison, Chas. W. (Sp.)....Los Angeles 
Harrison, Edna Alice (F.).. Los Angeles 
Harrison, Helen M. (S.).. ..Los Angeles 

Harrod, Hazel (S.) Santa Monica 

Hartford, Emile A. (Sr.)....Los Angeles 
Hartman, Ernest K. (Sp.)..S. Pasadena 
Hartog, Mary K. (Sp.).... Portland, Ore. 
Harvey, Rachelle M. (Sp.).. Los Angeles 
Harvey, Rowland H. (Sr.).. Los Angeles 

Hass, Edith Clare (F.) Hollywood 

Hasselo, Lorraine (S.) Los Angeles 

Hauser, Ernest S. (S.) Los Angeies 

Hawkins, Walter R. G. (Sp.).. Pasadena 

Hawley, Willis M. (F.) Los Angeles 

Hazeltine, Mina E. (F.) Los Angeles 

Hazeltine, Earle Foote (F.).... Pasadena 
Headley, Harold (F.)....W. Jefferson, O. 
Heath, Alpha Damon (Sp.).. Holly wood 
Hedley, George P. (S.)-Redondo Beach 

Hedrick, Albert E. (S.) Los Angeles 

Heflinger, Lydia Elsie (S.) Pasadena 

Helbach, Merle Raymond (F.).. Imperial 

Helm, Henrietta S. (Sr.) Pasadena 

Helm, Isabelle (S.) Pasadena 

Helm, Marjorie Emily (F.)....Pasadena 

Henderson, Clifford (J.) Los Angeles 

Henderson, Gordon J. (F.).. Los Angeles 
Henderson, Mary F. (F.).... Ocean Park 

Henninger, George Ross (F.) Venice 

Henrickson, Althea L. (Sr.).. Santa Ana 
Henshaw, Gaston D. (F.).. Phoenix, Ariz. 

Hepler, Fern (S.) Pasadena 

Hepler, Phtllis (S.) Pasadena 

Herron, Margaret E. (J.)....Lankershim 

Hervey, Edgar B. (F.) Los Angeles 

Hester, Orie C. (S.) Los Angeles 

Hewitt, Edward M. (Sr.)....Los Angeles 

Hewitt, Theodore (S.) Los Angeles 

Heywood, Ralph McC. (S.).. Hollywood 
Hicks, Vera Valine (Sr.).... Los Angeles 

Hidden, Gladys (J.) Los Angeles 

Hiett, Myrtle Anna (Sr.).. Sidney, Neb. 

Higgins, Elsie (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Higgins, Lena (Sp.) Long Beach 

Higman, Nellie (Sp.) ...Los Angeles 

Hilliard, Mrs. B. E. (Sp.).Xos Angeles 

Hinricks, Fred Charles (F.) Orange 

Hirschfield, Ellis I. (S.) Los Angeles 

Hiskey, Marguerite I. (Sr.).. Los Angeles 

Hitchcock, Donald W. (F.) Salinas 

Hitchcock, E. E. (Sp.) Glendale 

Hitchcock, Leslie I. (F.) Salinas 

Hoch, Joseph E. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Hocking, Nellie Ray (S.) Pasadena 

Hodge, Vernon H. (J.) Long Beach 

Hofert, Esther L. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Hoffman, E. Dow (J.) Los Angeles 



Catalogue of Students 



315 



Hoffman, Grace (S.) Los Angeles 

Hoffman, Margery (Sp.) Pasadena 

Hoffman, Mary V. (F.) Pasadena 

Hollabaugh, Julian G. (S.) Pasadena 

Hollingsworth, Joycie Jones (Sr.) 

Casa Verdugo 

Holhvay, Flora Etta (Sp.)..Long Beach 

Holmes, Edith M. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Homrighausen, G. A. (Sr.)..Los Angeles 
Homuth, Earl Ulysses (F.)..Los Angeles 

Hood, Blanche (J.) Los Angeles 

Hood, Mary K. (Sr.) Hicksville, O. 

Hopkins, Clarence G. (Sp.)..Los Angeles 
Hopkins, Ernest J. (Sr.)....Los Angeles 

Home, Ruth (Sr.) Hollywood 

Hoskyn, Marian P. (F.) Los Angeles 

Hosmer, Matthew Newell (F.)..Turlock 

Hosono, Gunji (F.) Los Angeles 

Hovey, Byron P. (J.) Los Angeles 

Howard, Edward A. (F.).... Los Angeles 

Howard, Mary C. (S.) Los Angeles 

Howell, Editha (Sr.) Santa Ana 

Howell, Kenneth L. (S.)....Los Angeles 
Howell, Marjorie P. (F.)....Los Angeles 
Howze, Katherine L. (Sp.)..Los Angeles 

Hubbard, Edith M. (F.) Eagle Rock 

Hubbard, Ruth (J.) Los Angeles 

Huff, William F. (Sp.) Long Beach 

Hughes, Elise E. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Hughes, Florence L. (Sp.).;Los Angeles 

Hughes, Walter F. (S.) Los Angeles 

Hull, Clara Ruth (Sr.) Orange 

Hull, Farwell P. (S.) Los Angeles 

Hume, Georgiana M. (S.)..Los Angeles 
Humphreys, Helen M. (J.)..Los Angeles 
Humphry, Floyd M. (F.)....Los Angeles 

Hunsberger, Neva M. (F.) Reedley 

Hunt, Ethelyn Juliet (S.)..Los Angeles 
Hunt, Lloyd Freeman (J.)..Los Angeles 

Hunt, Paul Adams (J.) Los Angeles 

Huse, Lucy (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Hurt, James H. (J.) iGlendale 

Hyatt, Mary E. (J.) Los Angeles 

Imogawa, Kiichi (F.) Los Angeles 

Ingledue, Doris E. (F.) Glendale 

Ingoldsby, Nellie M. (Sp.)..Los Angeles 
Inman, Milton Miller (S.)..Los Angeles 
Wood, Pauline M. (Sr.)..Los Angeles 
Irwin, Ruth Elizabeth (F.)......R e dondo 

Isenhouer, William L. (F.).Xos Angeles 

Isenstein, Zangwill (P.) Los Angeles 

Ives Anna N. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Iwak. Tokujiro (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Jack Ford M. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Jacoby, Arthur D. (F.) Los Angeles 

James, Hattie (F.) Los Angeles 

James, Muriel V. (Sp.) ..Long Beach 



James, Vivian Wanda (F.).. Los Angeles 

Jamgochian, Matthew (Sp.) Tropico 

Janney, Dewey Heber (F.)..Los Angeles 
Jaquist, Lewis Lecn (Sp.).. Los Angeles 

Javoneta, Juan E. (F.) Los Angeles 

Jeancon, Etta C. (J.) Los Angeles 

Jeffras, Nathaniel G. (F.)....Los Angeles 

Jenkins, Ethel Lois (J.) Los Angeles 

Jenness, Kathleen J. (Sr.)..Los Angeles 

Jenney, Sarah E. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Jensen, Coral Esther (F.).... Los Angeles 

Jessup, Mildred K. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Johanson, C. E. (S.) Los Angeles 

Johnson, Amelia C. (J.) Los Angeles 

Johnson, Charles Lamb (F.) Venice 

Johnson, Harriet Mary (Sp.), 

New York City 

Johnson, Howard (F.) Los Angeles 

Johnson, Margaret (Sp.) Alhambra 

Johnson, Mary E. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Johnson, O. Verner (Sr.) Kingsburg 

Johnson, Roy Delbert (F.)..Los Angeles 
Johnston, Mary G. (Sp.)....Los Angeles 
Jones, Fredk. C. H. (F.)....Los Angeles 
Jones, Mary Caroline (Sp.)..Los Angeles 
Jordan, Henry Ervin (Sr.)..Los Angeles 

Jordan, Ruby C. (F.) Los Angeles 

Joshn, Clarence" E. (S.) Los Angeles 

Josten, E. Mildred (Sp.)....Los Angeles 

Joy, Elmer Reuben (S.) Santa Paula 

Judd, Beryl (F.) Los Angeles 

Judson, Louise F. (J.) Los Angeles 

Juvmall, Gladys (S.) Monrovia 

Kaiser, Bernice G. (Sp.) San Jacinto 

Kalfus, Joseph Deland (Sp.)....San Jose 
Kallstedt, Frances E. E/(Sr.)..Pasadena 

Kallstedt, Mildred V. (F.) Pasadena 

Kauffman, Mary B. (F.) Los Angeles 

Kaye, Virgil Lewis (F.) S. Pasadena 

Kean, Georgia Mary (Sp.).Xos Angeles 
Keefe, Thomas Henry (F.).. Hollywood 

Keener, Lois Myrtella (S.) Pasadena 

Kegley, Helen C. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Kejthly, Harry A. (F.).. San Bernardino 
Kelley, Ransom L. (F.)....Vilonia, Ark 
Kellogg, Margaret E. (Sp.)..Los Angeles 
Kelly, Genevieve E. (S.)....Los Angeles 
Kemp, Margaret L. (Sp.)..Los Angeles 

Kendall, Leona B. (F.) Los Angeles 

Kepler, Leslie (F.) Tropico 

Kern, Helen (Sr.) Norwalk 

Kern, Lewis George (F.)....Los Angeles 

Kibre, Adele B. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Kidwell, Evelyn (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Kiehm, Isaac S. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Kim, Kwan You (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Kimbley, Gertrude (F.) Riverside 



316 



University of Southern California 



Kinder, Evelyn C. (Sr.) LosAnge 

King, J. Raymond (F.) Riverside 

King, Oona Caroline (F.) Fillmore 

Kipp, Warren Augustus Jr. (F.)--~ 

.Yonkers, N. Y. 
Kirchu^' Ernily (Sp.) -----Los Angeles 
Kirkpatrick, Annie J. (J.)-Los Ange les 
Kirkpatrick, Hale L. (F.)- Burbank 

Kiss, Geza John (F.) San Bernardino 

Kistner, Glyda Belle (F.)~ - Ontario 

Kling, Hazel C. (F.) Los Angeles 

Klingberg, Franees I. (J.) Whitticr 

Knape, Elsa Evelyn (S.) Gardena 

Knickrehm, Fred W!. (J.). -Los Ange es 

Knight, Charles L. (S.) Los Ange es 

Knight, Gladys M. (S.) Los Angeles 

Knox, LaVerne (S.) Whitticr 

Kodil, Charles Edw. (F.) -Los Angeles 
Kopp, Theodore Edw. (J.) -Los Ange es 

Krause, Anna (J.) Los Angeles 

Krebs, William (J.) A ™ s * 

Kreitman, Frank (F.) Los Angeles 

Kuhrts, Sue (F.) Los Ange es 

Lackey, Helen K. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Lacy, J. Samuel (Sp.) Burbank 

LaDue, Wendell Richard (Sr.) 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

Lambert," Gerald C. (F.). -Los Angeles 

Lampert, Gladys (F.) Glendale 4 

Lamport, Harry B. (S.) Los Ange es 

Lamport, Warren D. (S.) -Los Angeles 

Lane, Rita (J.) Yucaipa 

Lane, Winona Marie (J.) Van Nuys 

Lauderbach, J. Calvin (S.)— Santa Ana 
Laughren, Catherine (S.)— Los Angeles 

Lawler, James K. (Sr.) Gardena 

Lawler, John W. (Sr.) Gardena 

Lawler, William H. (F.) Gardena 

Lawton, Mrs. A. J. (Sp.)— Los Angeles 
Lawyer, Paul Carey (S.)— Los Angeles 

Learned, Marjorie C. (S.) Pasadena 

Leech, Vernon E. (J.) Los Angeles 

Leedy, Josephine (S.) Alhambra 

Lefevre, Ora Linn (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Leick, Lucia M. (Sp.) Long Beach 

Leohner, Jean Eliz. (F.)— Los Angeles 

Leonhardy, Alma (S.) Los Angeles 

LeSage, Marguerite (F.)— Los Angeles 

Leuer, Al. Henry (J.) Long Beach 

Leve, Morris (F.) Los Angeles 

Leevring, Fay Burnette (S.)— Fairoaks 

Levering, Fern Lucile (F.) Fairoaks 

Levison, Ben Louis (F.)— Los Angeles 

Levis, Mahlon (S.) Kingsburg 

Lewering, Alfred S. (F.) Long Beach 

Lewis, Anna Lucille (F.)— Long Beach 
Lewis, Eugene Maring (S.)-Inglewood 



Lewis, Rosebud Alice (F.) -Long Beach 

Lewis Winnie D. (Sr.) Burbank 

Lewman, Gertrude (S.) Los Angeles 

ZZ, Cora Mae (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Liggett, Veva Dale (F.) Long Beach 

S5W. Francis ^ (FO-Xos Angeles 

Lindley, Logan (F.) — Angdes 

LmkC e ^^:'(Sp:)^--LosAn f eles 

Lnk Edna Marie (Sp.) Long Beach 

Lnn Mary Seaman (J.)-Los Ange es 

List, Ruth Eleanor S. L . Ange. 

Litterer, Bess e K (SO- ^ Ind< 

Little, Fredench E. (&->-- w V- > 

LiZOt ; e 'rf iC i e es u\sV' -Campbell 
V° 7 £ HhW (FolLos Angeles 

MX-tv** jj-s 

Longley, Snow t.sp.;.--- Pasa detia 

Loomis, Florence (Sp.)---- -~«- *££ 
Loomis, Mrs. Nina L (D-Los ^nfeles 

tt£$g& jsft£ 

^e\ Loyd (F.) - L°s Angeles 






t 'S R ;RreU < hauer)" > Gertrude Flor- 
Lynch Brettnauer,, Los Angele 

Ly e o n n e w" Ham •'?.' Jr:"(Sp:):Xos Angeles 

McCartney, Norma M-Tf ?"*£%££ 
££££?. STa ( H F.) (F Sanfa a Ba^a g ra 
McCoy, Adelaide N(Sp.)-.Lon^ jBeach 

McCrea Iola Dacotah (J.) Ontario 

McCreery, M. E. (Sp.) •*%* ^ 
McCullough, Edward E. CSp.).*M»«n» 

McDanid. Jean <Sp.).-.-L~^S 

McDonald, Anita A. <f ^7'^ » * eles 

McDonald Mary C. (F.). .-Los Ange e 
McEachin; Mary W.(Sp.)-Xos Ange 
McEndree Pearl B s (Sp.)Xos Ange.es 

McEuen, Isabel (»rj mu j 

McLyen,DwightS(S.)..LongBe ,ch 

McFadyen, Marie (F.) Long Beacn 



Catalogue of Students 



317 



McFarraugh, Margaret (Sp.) 

Los Angeles 

McGarray, W. E. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

McGary, Lester (Sp.) Norwalk, Wis. 

McGee, Nilla Ruth (F.) Montebello 

Mcllvaine, Lillian A. (J. )..Los Angeles 
McKee, Augusta L. (Sp.)-Los Angeles 

McKee, Doris Lena (J.) Los Angeles 

McKee, Margaret G. (F.).... Hollywood 

McKenna, S. B. (Sp.) Lawndale 

McKim, Mildred (F.)....San Bernardino 

McKinney, Joyce (J.) La Mesa 

McKinnon, Ida B. K. (Sr.)....Pasadena 
McKnight, Clifford (Sp.)....Los Angeles 
McLaughlin, Gertrude (J.). .Los Angeles 
McMillan, Dan Alex. (S.)-Los Angeles 
VfcMore, Blanch A. (Sr.).Xos Angeles 

VIcMurry, R. D. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

VIcNeely, John G. (Sp.).-Santa Monica 
tfcNeese, Nora Lee (Sr.)-Los Angeles 
McNeil, Ruth Helen (J.)....Los Angeles 
tfcNichols, Beulah (Sp.)....Los Angeles 
McQueen, Annie Clinton (Sp.) 

New York City 

IcWilliams, Alice C. (Sp.).. Los Angeles 

tfacCormack, Eliz. (F.) Los Angeles 

<facCormack, W. R. (J.). ...Los Angeles 
lacDonald, Esther (Sr.)...Xos Angeles 
lacFarlane, Muriel (F.)....Los Angeles 

laclntosh, Doris (F.) Los Angeles 

laclntosh, Eleanor C. (J.). .Los Angeles 

laclntyre, Etta P. (J.) Los Angeles 

fack, Hebe Louise (J.)..Santa Monica 
lackie, Mildred W. (S.)-.Los Angeles 
lacMillan, Clifford J. (Sp.) 

-. Los Angeles 

Ladden, Florence N. (S.).. Los Angeles 
[ahan, Henry W. Jr. (J.). .Los Angeles 

tahoney, Alice L. (J.) Los Angeles 

[ail, Harriet Alter (Sr.)...Xos Angeles 
talimit, Emilio (Sp.)..Pontevedra, P. I. 

'anley, Melba Alice, (Sp.) Fowler 

Vlantonya, L. R. (F.) Los Angeles 

arbut, E. H. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

arr, Esther (F.) Los Angeles 

arriott, Gladys G. (F.)....Los Angeles 

arston, Bert, (S.) Los Angeles 

artens, Freida (Sr.) Los Angeles 

artin, Alice C. (F.) Los Angeles 

artin, Clair (S.) Beaumont 

artin, Gertrude R. (Sp.).Xos Angeles 

artin, Lyle (Sp.) Kansas City, Mo. 

arvm, Hallie (Sr.) Los Angeles 

arvin, Robert W. (F.) Los Angeles 

ason, Bessie H. (J.) Los Angeles 

ason, Florence G. (Sr.).Xos Angeles 
ason, Grace Z. (Sp.) Los Angeles 



Mason, Helen Mary (F.) Comtpon 

Mason, Luella K. (Sp.) Long Beach 

Mason, Sarah E. (Sp.) . Pasadena 

Masters, Alice M. (F.) San Diego 

Mathews, Nettie Alice (J.) Artesia 

Maurer, George Paul (F.).Xos Angeles 
Maylor, Marcellus L. (F.).Xos Angeles 
Mead, Grace Gertrude (S.).Xos Angeles 
Meekins, Neala M. (Sp.)...Xos Angeles 
Micklejohn, Ethel L. (Sp.).Xong Beach 

Meinicke, Joseph Bertrum (J.) 

Paia Maui, T. H. 

Melvin, Ruby K. (Sp.) Long Beach 

Merritt, Katherine B. (Sp.).Xos Angeles 

Messner, Zella A. (F.) Los Angeles 

Metcalfe, Tom (S.) Los Angeles 

* Deceased. 
Metafessel, Louise (Sp.)...Xos Angeles 
Mickey, Paul Elwood (S.).Xos Angeles 
Middaugh, Virginia C. (F.).JI oily wood 
Millar, Cheryl R. L. (Sp.).Xos Angeles 

Millard, Flora J. (Sp.) Pasadena 

Miller, Alfred Fredk. (S.).Xong Beach 

Miller, Edna Elzada (Sp.)...., Tropico 

Miller, Ellabert (Sp.) Tropico 

Miller, Eva Mae (F.)..Pomeroy, Wash. 
Miller, Georgia K. (Sp.).. ..Los Angeles 

Miller, Marjorie (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Miller, Martin S. (J.) Burton, Wash. 

Miller, Mary Jane (Sp.) 

- Ft. Collins, Colo. 

Miller, Myron H. (F.) Los Angeles 

Miller, Theo. K. (S.) Los Angeles 

Milligan, Nancy G. (Sr.)...Xos Angelee 
Mills, John Gordon (Sr.)...Xos Angeles 
Minthorn, Leonard L. (J.).. Los Angeles 
Misner, Dorothy E. (F.)...Xos Angeles 

Mitchell, Chester (F.) Alhambra 

Modesti, Phinoclade (Sp.).Xos Angeles 

Monfort, Harriet (S.) Los Angeles 

Monfort, Jean Bain (F.)...Xos Angeles 
Montgomery, Clarence Wesley (F.).. 

Whittier 

Moon, Louise Mary (Sr.).Xos Angeles 

Moore, Edith Carol (S.) Fillmore 

Moore, James Allison (F.).Xos Angeles 

Moore, J. Glenn (S.) San Diego 

Moore, Rutherford Drummond (F.).. 

Los Angeles 

Morgan, Frances I. (F.) Long Beach 

Morley, Alice Louise (F.).Xos Angeles 
Morres, Nora Kathleen (S.).Xos Angeles 

Morrill, Nina S. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Morris, R. W. (J.) Los Angeles 

Morse, Arthur Burton ( J. ).Xos Angeles 
Morse, Frances Eliz. (F.)....HolIywood 



318 



University of Southern California 



Morse, Helen Frances (S.)-Los Ange es 

Mortley, May O. (S.) Los Angeles 

Morton Lyda Mary (F0^--.Pasa4ena 

Moskedal, Elisabet Anna (SO-.Downcy 

Moss, Zelda (F.) - -Los Ang e es 

Mosseman, Adele M. (Sp.)-Los Ange es 

Moulton, Harold E. (J.) Los Angeles 

Muller, Augusta (S ) - -San Pedro 

Mullin, Wayne F. (F.) Los Angeles 

Mulvane, Virgiline (F.).. San Bernardino 

Mumper, William H. (F.) Riverside 

Munro, John Alex. (F.).-Melrose Mass. 
Murakami, Peter T. (Sr.).-Los Ange es 

Murakami, Tsuneo (F.) Los Angeles 

Murchey, Hope (Sp.) Detroit, Mich. 

Murray, Geraldine (J.). -Cheyenne, Wyo. 
Murray Glen W. (F.).... Ash Grove, Mo. 

Myersf Ada Irene (F.) Moneta 

Myers Bertha B. (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Nagai Fred M. (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Nafatir, Julius (F.) -Los Ange es 

Nash, Clara Louise (Sp.)-Los Ange es 

Nau, Converse (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Nease, Floyd Wm. (Sr.) Phoenix, Ariz. 

Nelson, Ha'zel L. (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Nelson, Jennette (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Nelson, M. Grant (Sp ) Pasadena 

Nelson, Wesley R. (J.). -Norwood, Colo. 

Neptune, John Russell (J.) -Fresno 

Nesty, D. Elody (Sr.) Los Ange es 

Neiils, Marion (J,)~^ - -}** ^^ 

Neumann, Theodore (S ) Turlock 

Nevins, Leland Starr (F.) -Cloyis 

Nevins, Mary C. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Newman, William (Sp.) Long Beach 

Newsom, W. J. (Sp.) --Garden Grove 

Newton, Genevra L. (J.). -Los Angeles 
Nicholson, Florence E. (S.)-Alhambra 
Nicoll, Alice Heber (Sp.) -Los Ange es 

Nielsen, Anders (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Niemeyer, Laura (S.)J Los Ange es 

Nilsson, P. T. (Sp.)- "Los Angeles 

Nimmo, Violet M. (S.)-Detroit Mich. 

Noble, Annie Rose (J.) Los Angeles 

Noble, Lorraine Emily (F.) Oxnard 

Nordstrom, Benj. G. (S.) Kingsbnrg 

Nourse, Mary E. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Nuffer, Emily C. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Nuffer, Harry Homer (F.) Orange 

O'Brien, Kathryn H. (F.) Pasadena 

O'Connell, Leland D. (J.) -Los Ange es 
O'Connor, Lillian M. (S.).Xos Ange es 

O'Connor, Zena C. (S.) Los Ange es 

O'Donoughue, Mary (F.). -Los Angeles 
Oertly, George W. (S.) -Garden Grove 

Oestern, Rose M. (S.) Los Angeles 

Offdenkamp, A. Ruth .(Sp.). -Pasadena 



Ogawa, Kentoro Frank (F.)-.Iyo, Japan 
(THara, Elizabeth S. (F.).-Los Ange es 

Okami, Shigeichi (F.) -Los Angeles 

Olson, Elma Sophia (Sp.) --Turlock 



Olson, Ruth A. (F.) Huntington Pk. 

Oneal Charles H. (Sr.) S.Pasadena 

Oneal, Gertrude (S.) --------Pasadena 

O'Neill, Eleanor Patricia (bp.) --- 

U ' Great Falls, Mont. 

Osterhout'," Josephine Minnie ("F.)«j- 

Big Piney, Wyo. 

Otis, Jane Dellingham (F.) - - - 

Durango, Colo. 

Oyler7Maude''"('s.) Los Angeles 

Page, Mabel (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Paine, Caroline L. (Sp.) .-...Orange 

Palm, David Carl (F.) Kingsburg 

Palmer, Elmer B. (Sr.) Compton 

Palmer, Frances Mabel (J.) .-Pasadena 
Palmer, Greta Garmo (Sr.).. Los Angeles 
Palmer, Percy Edw. (J.). .Garden Grove 
Palmer, Zuma Margaret (S.). -Pasadena 
Pape, Myrtle Harrison (J.)..Los Angeles 

Park, Anna Belle (S.) Los Angeles 

Parker, Evert L. (S.) -- Pomona 

Parker, Florence M. (J.). -Los Angeles 

Parmelee, Gale Freeland (J.) »»» 

Iron Mountain, Mich. 
Parrish,"'l)ouglas V. (S.). -Los Angeles 

Patten, Helen Claire (F.) -Covina 

Patterson, Joe Jay (J.) Los Ange es 

Patterson, Margaret T.(J.)-Los Ange es 

Pearce, Lillian C. (J.) Los Angeles 

Peart, Eunice Mae (F.) Glendale 

Pease, Fannie M. (Sp.) Santa Ana 

Peck Marjorie Eliz. (S.)— Los Angeles 

Peile, Carrie D. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Pendleton, M. R. (Sp.) Long Beach 

Pendleton, Walter R. (F.).. Long Beach 
Pepper, Elizabeth N. (Sr.).. Los Angeles 

Pesquira, lgnacio (F.) San Fernando 

Perry, Alexander (F.) Los Angeles 

Perry, Harold S. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Peterson, Mildred Elizabeth (Sr.) 

Lafayette, Ind. 

Peterso' n ;"jennie C. (J.) Los Angeles 

Petri Mrs. Ethel (Sp.).- Los Angeles 

Pfeiffer, Mrs. S. G. (Sp.) -Los Angeles 
Pfeiffer, William T. (Sp.). -Los Angeles 
Phelps, Davenport R. (F.).-Los Angeles 

Phillippi, John (F.) Los Angeles 

Pierce, Maria Fitch (J.) Los Angeles 

Pierson, Olive Iona (F...) El Monte 

Pitkin, Virginia Caroline Lawndes 

/-p ) Los Angele 

Place, Hazel" Meryl (F.) -Los Angele 
Place Frieda Marie (Sp.) -Long Bead 



Catalogue of Students 



319 



Plumb, Vauche Etoil (Sp.)--Santa Ana 
Podolsky, Boris J. (Sr.).... Los Angeles 

Pollich, R. E. (J.) Los Angeles 

Ponder, Susan (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Pooley, Eleanor G. (Sp.).... Long Beach 
Poorman, Mildred M. (Sr.).. Los Angeles 

Pope, Zemula M. (J.) Los Angeles 

Porter, Gertrude E. (S.)....Boise, Idaho 
Porter, Margaret A. (Sr.).. Los Angeles 
Potter, Charles Henry (F.).. Ocean Park 
Powers, Gloria Mae (F.).... Los Angeles 
Prather, Mildred E. (F.)....Los Angeles 

Preble, Boyd (S.) Santa Ana 

Price, Edwin (Sr.) Hawthorne 

Prior, Elizabeth F. (Sp.)....Los Angeles 
Raab, Marion P. (F.)....South Pasadena 
Rager, Robert Louis (F.).. Santa Monica 

Ramboz, Ina W. (J.) Los Angeles 

Ramsell, C. E. (F.) : Alta Loma 

Ramsey, Antoinette Lillie (S.)..Parlier 
Rathwell, Thomas R. (Sr.)..Los Angeles 
Rathwell, Lelia M. (F.)....Los Angeles 
Rayner, Charlotte A. (F.)..Los Angeles 

Reagan, Frank (F.) Long Beach 

Reay, Russell Hunter (F.)..Los Angeles 

Record, Arthur W. (S.) Los Angeles 

Record, Marjorie (Sr.) Hollywood 

Rector, Wilhelmina M. (S.).Xos Angeles 

Reed, Lawson (S.) Los Angeles 

Reed, Lucile (S.) Los Angeles 

Reeves, Claude Lamar (S.)..Simla, Col. 

Reeves, Marie Lulu (F.) Downey 

Reinhard, Charles John (Sp.).. Montrose 

Reith, Hortense C. (Sp.)...., Pasadena 

Rensberger, Romana Roselle (Sp.).... 

Los Angeles 

Rhoads, C. V. R. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Rich, Dora May (F.) Long Beach 

Richards, Ethel E. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Richardson, Helen B. (Sp.)..Los Angeles 
Richmond, Dean Sawing (J.)....Artesia 

Rickerich, Anna (Sp.) Santa Ana 

Riddick, Joseph Bean (S.)..Long Beach 
Riemenschneider, Esther Lida (J.).... 

Modesto 

Riemenschneider, Mabelle M. (S.)..„ 

Modesto 

Riley, Portia Alice (S.) Los Angeles 

Riley, Sally Clark (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Ringle, Florence E. (Sp.)....Los Angeles 

Risher, Martha V. (S.) Pasadena 

Ritchie, Katharine McKenzie (F.).... 

Fillmore.. 

Ritter, Mrs. Blanche (Sp.)..Los Angeles 
Robbins, Letitia (F.).... Huntington Pk. 

Roberson, "Ury H. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Roberts, Loretta M. (F.).... Los Angeles 



Roberts, Milton Louis (J.). .San Diego 

Roberts, Ruby Eloise (S.) Monrovia 

Robertson, Edgar (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Rockwell, Edward W. (J.)....Inglewood 

Roesch, Doris (Sp.) Douglas, Ariz. 

Rogers, Berdella (J.) Los Angeles 

Rogers, John Brady (S.)....Los Angeles 
Rohde, Magdalena (Sp.).-Los Angeles 

Rohrig, Elnora (F.) Upland 

Rohrig, Ethel Helen (F.) Upland 

Romer, Margaret H. (J.).... Los Angeles 
Rose, Margaret L. (S.)..Hermosa Beach 

Rose, Milton I. (F.) Los Angeles 

Roseberg, Estelle L. (S.)....Los Angeles 
Roseman, Cleos C. (Sp.)....Los Angeles 

Rosenberg, Maurice William (S.) 

Winnipeg, Manitoba 

Rosendahl, Charles Thomas Wesley 

(F) Kingsburg 

Ross, Elinor Cordelia (Sr.).... Pasadena 

Ross, Elizabeth Alda (Sp.) Pomona 

Ross, Harold E. (J.) Los Angeles 

Ross, Hazel D, (F.) Sawtelle 

Rothe, Gertrude V. (F.) Los Angeles 

Rudkin, Maude Forsythe <£.).. Fillmore 

Ruschhaupt, Adolph (F.) Fresno 

Russell, Eva Margaret (S.)..Los Angeles 

Ryder, Milton Phillips (S.) Parker 

Ryker, Mary Merrill (S.) Pasadena 

Rykoff, Sarah (J.) Los Angeles 

Ryland, Mary Peltice (F.)....Hollywood 

Sadicoff, Sophia Sonia (Sp.) Anaheim 

St. Pierre, Irene M. (J.).. ..Los Angeles 

Saxon, William H. (F.) Los Angeles 

Saxton, Harriette A. (Sp.)..Los Angeles 

Scharf, Keil John (S.) Santa Ana 

Schauer, Ulysses S. (S.).... Los Angeles 
Schelnick, Lydia M. (J.)....Los Angeles 

Schlotte, Nellita Fern (Sr.) 

Los Angeles 

Schlotter, Edna Mae (F.).. Los Angeles 

Schlueter, Katherine A. (F.) 

Los Angeles 

Schmidt, Cena Kathryn (S.)..San Pedro 
Schneider, Elsa Laura (J.)..Los Angeles 

Schnoor, Gladys B. (Sr.) Burbank 

Schoeller, Marjorie V. (F.)..Los Angeles 

Schultz, Hazel Amalia (S.) Fullerton 

Schurr, Helen Dorothy (S.) Puente 

Scott, Clifford Clark (Sr.)....Bakersneld 

Seargeant, William Bryan (S.) 

Redondo Beach 

Sedweek, Edna M. (Sr.) Inglewood 

Sedgweek, Allan E. (Sr.)..Los Angeles 

Sedwick, Ruth G. (F.) Los Angeles 

Segerstrom, Esther L. (Sr.).. Santa Ana 
Sein, Herbert M. (F.) Los Angeles 



320 



University of Southern California 



Seitter,Karl Cornish (F.) --Pasadena 

Seldomridge, Carroll Hue (J)~- ■ 

...Los Angeles 
Senn'eff rGert'rude;' WJ '(J.) ..Los Angeles 

Sentous, Zoe (S.) - -Los Ange es 

Sexton, Andrew D. (Sr.)-.Los Ange es 

Shaff, Amy (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Shaffer, Harry Edgar (F.) Stockton 

Shaffer, Helen E. (S.).-..--Los Ange es 

Sharp, Edwin Thomas (J.) .-Needles 

Shaw, Henry W. (Sp.)..Winchester, O. 

Shellenberger, Webb White (F.) ■ 

Los Angeles 

ShepardTMrs; Mary N. (Sp.)..-.- - 

Los Angeles 
She'rw^odr'Harel'Marie (F.), --Fellows 
Sherwood, Nora (Sp.)-Knoxville Iowa 

Shidler, Lois (Sp.) Long Beach 

Shields, Mary L. (Sp.) -Los Angeles 

Shields, Juneau Harry (S.)-Siler, Idaho 
Shoemaker, William B. (F.)-Pasadena 

Shull,Mrs. D. P. (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Shull,D. Paul (S.) Los Angeles 

Shute,Adelia R. (J..)--Hermosa Beach 



Stanley, Charles Lewis (Sp.) -Pasadena 
Stannard, Ronald F. (Sr.)-S. Pasadena 

Starkey, James D. (F.) Los Ange es 

Steele, Abbie M. (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Steelhead, Bert F. (J.) Los Ange es 

Steelman, Samuel (S.) Los Ange es 

Steiger Freda Amelia (S.) -Los Angeles 

Stephens, Arthur W. (F.) Alhambra 

Sterling, Harriet B. (Sp.) -Pasadena 

Sterry, Nora (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Stevens, Lea May (Sp.) -Los Angeles 

Stewart, Mrs. Leona Cook (Sr.) . 

Los Angeles 

StE^7-BSS»""(i^) Los Angeles 

Stockton, William H. (F.) -Los Ange es 
Stockwell, Lucile N. (F.) -Los Angeles 

Stone, Blanche Mae (F.) Jherma 

Stone, Ethel C. (S.) Thermal 

Stone, Grace Irene (Sp.) Gardena 

Stone, A. Marguerite (Sr.) Gardena 

Stone, Nina Estelle (S.) Ontario 

Stork, Agnes Mulkey (Sp.),-Los Ange es 

Stout, Gurn (F.) Los Angeles 

Strait, Lyla Huston (Sr.) Riverside 

Stratton, Marjorie Allen (J.)-. 



S ig .r;,John H. (J.).- Los Angeles Stratton, ™™ = j--" ^ 

;umn« Franklin Coleman (F.) „. '•""""" v> ,„ n? \ Rnnlder 



Simmons, Franklin Coleman 

Upper Mont Clair, IN. J. 
SimmonsTHomer A. (F.).. Inglewood 

Simpson, Eddie (J.) Los Ange es 

Simms, Floy (F.) Los Angeles 

Skiles, Dorothy Anita (J.)....Santa Ana 

Skinner, Edna E. (Sr.) Los Ange es 

Slater, Collise Mary (F.)... .Los Angeles 

Slaughter, Paul (F.) " •- " 

Sloan, Iowa Myrtle (F.) -P asadena 

Slosson, Harold Dye (S.) Monrovia 

Smart, Albra Mary (Sr.) Santa Ana 

Smith, Emma Elizabeth (J.). .Monrovia 
Smith Emmett William (F )....F>llmore 
Smith, James Henry (F).-Los Ange es 
Smith, James Murray (F.). .Los Ange es 
Smith, Letha Crane (Sp.).-Los Ange es 
Smith, Mabel M. (J.)-...-Los Ange es 
Smith, Virginia June (F).... Los Angeles 

Smith, Wallace (J.) Kingsburg 

Snell, Ida Lillian (J.) Los Angeles 

Snidow, Florence Hattie (F )..LaVerne 
Soo-Hoo, Peter L. (F). ...Los Ange es 

Spencer, Natalie (S.) Los Angeles 

Sprenger, Florence Helen (Sr.)- - 

.... Los Angeles 
Sprin'g'er',''H'elcn ' M.''('S P .) ...Xos Angeles 

Spurlock, Sue (Sp.) Los Ang< des 

Stagg, Ira J. (J.) Anaconda Mont. 

Stagg Mary Boyd (J.)..--Los Angeles 
Stagg Samuel Wells (J.).. -Turlock 
Stamps, Mary Louise (Sp.)-.S. Pasadena 



Stratton, Rosemary (F.).. Boulder, Col. 

Strause, Margaret (S.) Los Ange es 

Strong, Elizabeth (F.) Los Ange es 

Stuart, Violet (S.) , Los Ange es 

Sullivan, Margaret (J.) Los Angeles 

Sutherland, Lawrence Eugene (J.) — 

Santa Paula 

Tannen'baum,'''"DavTd (S.)....Los Angeles 

Taylor, Arthur J. (J.)- Los Ange es 

Taylor, Charlotte E. (Sp.)..Los Angeles 

Taylor, Jackson P. (S.) Slidell, La. 

Taylor, Marjorie H. (S.).. -Los Angeles 

Taylor Robert R. (F.) -- Pasade " a , 

Taylor, Rose Edith (F.).. Los Angeles 
Taylor Venarris McL. (S.)..-. .-Fresno 
Tenbrer, Charles W. (F.). Stockton 

Thacker.M. Eva (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Thayer, Mabel Rozella (Sr.) Trop.co 

Thielcke, Rosalie M. (F.). .Los Ange es 
Thomas, Abigail V. (F.)...Xos Ange es 

Thomas, Alma M. (J.) Los Ange es 

Thomas, Grace M. (Sp.) . Los Ange es 
Thomas, Margaret O. (F- -Los Ange es 
Thomas, Virden LeM. (S.). -Los Ange es 
?homps'on, Alan Kerr (F) Los Angeles 
Thompson, Allen David ( F )-"S a1 *^ 

Thompson, Edna K. (S.) Fillmore 

Thompson, Nellie Mae (S.) Los , Angeles 
Thompson, Sarah B. (Sp.)-- -P a / adena 
Thomson, C. A. (Sp.) ...Xos Ange e 
Thornton, Jessie L. (F).-Los Angeles 



Catalogue of Students 



321 



Thornton, Mary M. (F.) Los Angeles 

Thurner, George A. (S.).... Los Angeles 
Thurston, Grace Edith (J.). Los Angeles 
Tipton, Leota Belle (F.).,..Los Angeles 

Todd, Lucy (Sr.) Long Beach 

Tomlinson, Lois M. (F.).... Long Beach 

Tompkins, Roy Lee (S.) Downey 

Toolen, Andrew J. (F.) Los Angeles 

Tornquist, Inez C. (F.) Los Angeles 

Tower, Beryl (F.) Redondo Beach 

Towles, Lucile (F.) Los Angeles 

Trammell, George W. (F.)..Los Angeles 

Trapp, Hazel M. (S.) Los Angeles 

Troegen, R. Glen (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Trout, George G. (F.) Burbank 

Troutman, Marie A. (F.)-Los Angeles 
Truesdale, Bessie Beatrice (S.)....Dinuba 

Truesdale, Elsie Alice (F.) Dinuba 

Tubman, Delphine (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Tucker, Harold W. (S.) Los Angeles 

Tucker, Nelle G. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Turner, Esther (J.) Los Angeles 

Turner, Marion E. (S.) Los Angeles 

Twomley, Pearl Evelyn (S.) Yucaipa 

I rata, Sadico (F.).„ Los Angeles 

*Valdez, Thomas A. (F.)....Los Angeles 
Vanderstempel, Arthur Siegfried (Sr.) 

Los Angeles 

Van Velzer, Francis Clare (J.) 

Los Angeles 

Varney, Verna Wanda (F.) Imperial 

Vawter, Nellie (J.) Santa Monica 

Verdugo, Rafael Louis (F.) Glendale 

Vincent, Melvin J. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Voorhees, Mildred Irving (Sp.)..Zelzah 

Vroom, Elma (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Wack, Mathilde (F.) Los Angeles 

Wadsworth, Gladys Fern (J.) 

" " - Los Angeles 

wagner, Mrs. Winona (Sr.) 

•-•-•- Los Angeles 

iVahl, Elizabeth B. (S.)....Los Angeles 
Waite, Mrs. Rebekah Bristow (J.) 

"-;': Los Angeles 

Valden, Anna W. (Sp.) Long Beach 

Valker, Charles Z. (J.) Long Beach 

talker, Helen Yetta (Sr.)..Los Angeles 

Valker, Jane (S.) Los Angeles 

Valker, Ruth Dariel (S.).... Los Angeles 

Vallace, T. Elinor (J.) Long Beach 

Vallace, Helen H. (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Vallace, Jean Angela (F.)..Los Angeles 

Varburg, Olaf E. (F.) Los Angeles 

Vare.John Allen (Sr.).. Kingman, Ariz. 
W^Toll R. (S.) Los Angeles 

* Deceased. 



Warner, Sarah Ellena (F.) Pomona 

Warren, Allmerry E. (F.) Downey 

Watson, Alice E. (F.)..Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Watson, Mrs. Minnie T. (Sr.) 

Los Angeles 

Watson, Romaine E. (F.)....Long Beach 
Watson, Ruth Lucia (Sr.)..Los Angeles 
Watt, Margaret P. (F.)..Mt. Morris, 111. 

Wear, Helen A. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Webber, W. T. (S.) Lemoore 

Weiss, Myrtle B. (S.)..: Los Angeles 

Weiss, Sherman B. (Sr.)....Los Angeles 

Welch, Elizabeth (F.) Long Beach 

Weld, Emma S. (Sp.) Santa Ana 

Weller, Gerald Morse (F.)..Los Angeles 

Wellman, Coe R. (J.) Anaheim 

Wells, Frances Stead (F.)..Long Beach 

Wendt, Harvey F. (Sr.) Pasadena 

Wentworth, Eva (Sp.) Pasadena 

Werner, Claus Edwin (S.)..Los Angeles 

Weyer, Clara E. (J.) Los Angeles 

Whitcomb, Elizabeth (Sp.).Xos Angeles 

White, Mrs. Carroll F. (S.) Pasadena 

White, Clair Arthur (F.) Hollywood 

White, Horace Winfred Beek (F.).._. 

Anaheim 

White, Marie A. (J.) Los Angeles 

White, Mrs. Merta (Sr.)....Los Angeles 

White, Rowena H. (F.) Los Angeles 

Whiteman, Marion E. (S.) Alhambra 

Whiteside, Lois E. (S.) Los Angeles 

Whitlock, Maud (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Whitmore, V. Bernice (S.)....Pasadena 
Whitnah, Dorothea (Sp.)....Los Angeles 

Wilhite, George (F.) Los Angeles 

Wilkes, Josephine E. (J.). .Los Angeles 
Wilkinson, Frank H. (S.).. Los Angeles 
Will, Arthur Joseph (J.).... Los Angeles 

Williams, Esther Ida (F.) Orange 

Williams, Rhoda (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Williams, Texa B. (Sp.) Long Beach 

Williams, Victoria G. (Sp.).Xos Angeles 

Willis, Henry M. (F.) Los Angeles 

Willis, Nora E. (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Willmert, Ellen (S.) Ontario 

Wilson, Daisyolah (Sr.) Los Angeles 

Wilson, Esther Mary (F.).. Los Angeles 
Wilson, Gerald W. (F.)..San Bernardino 

Wilson, Howard W. (S.)_ Escondido 

Wilson, Mabel (F.) Orange 

Wilson, Venus E. (S.) Los Angeles 

Wilson, Will Farrand (F.)..Waco, Tex. 

Wingert, Sarah M. (J.) Whittier 

Wingood, Norma E. (J.) Santa Ana 

Winterrowd, Ruby M. (Sr.) Orange 

Winship, Mrs. Amy D. (Sp.) 

Los Angeles 



322 



University of Southern California 



Wisler, Mrs. Emma C. (Sp.)---.---- 

Hollywood 

Woeh7Reginard'"'7s"rO Los Angeles 

Woleben, Marion Lois (SO------ •• 

....Chicago Heights, III. 

Wolf"," Harry (F.) -- Oxnard 

Wolf, Sam (Sp.) Los Ange es 

Woltmann, Rose M. (Sp.)-Los Ange es 
Wonder, Irena Violet (J.)-Los Ange es 

Wood, Emma Lois (S.) Los Ange es 

Wood, Frances Ruth (Sr.)--Los Angeles 
Wood, Irene Lucile (J.). ...Los Angeles 

Wood, Margaret (S.) Los Ange es 

Wood, Virginia (Sp.) Los Angeles 

Woodard, Leila Alice (F).... Los Angeles 
Woodhead, Charlene (Sp.) -Los Angeles 
Woods, John (F.) Fullerton 



Woodward, James L. (F.).Xos Ange es 

Wooley, Helen (S.) Los Angeles 

Woolsey, Martha Jane (S.)..Hollywood 

Work, Mary Isabel (J.) Reedley 

Workman, Mary J. (Sp.)-.Los Ange es 
Wright, Catherine L. (F.).. Los Angeles 
Wright, Corinne King (J.). .San Gabriel 
Wrisley, Clara Louise Barker (J.)-— 

Los Angeles 

Wue7thoff7Elirieae"" (S.) Los Angeles 

Yokoyama, Tokijl (S.) Los Ange es 

Young, Blanche A. (Sp.)--Los Angeles 

Young, Romaine A. (F.) Fillmore 

Zensen, Minnie Mae (S.).... Los Angeles 

Ziegler, Arthur N. (JO Long Beach 

Zuck,John Monroe (J.) Palms 

Zybura, Mrs. Coral (J.) Los Angeles 



Catalogue of Students 



323 



GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

Note— The abbreviation "H.S." refers to candidacy for the Uni- 
versity Recommendation for the High School Teacher's Certifi- 
cate; "A.M." to the Master of Arts Degree 



Aborn, Mrs. Vinnie Ream, A.M H.S. 

Pomona College, 1912 Zoology 

Aid, Frank Douglass, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 Mathematics 

Allen, Mrs. Belle, A.B H.S. 

Cornell, 1906 Latin, History 

Aiken, Mildred, A.B H.S. 

Occidental, 1914 . English 

Akutso, Mitsuo A.M. 

Waseda Univ., 1915 Economics 

Andrews, Ellen L., A.B A.M., H.S. 

Stanford, 1916 History 

Asher, Katherine Lucile, A. B A.M. 

Univ. of Cal., 1911, Lat., Phys. Trng. 
Babson, Helen Corliss, A.B A.M. 

Vassar, 1905 .Sociology 

Ball, Esther Elizabeth, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1916 Botany, Spanish 

Ball, William David, A.M 

Denver Univ., 1908 Psychol!, Eng. 

Sarnes, Jessie Baldwin, A.B. ..A.M., H.S. 

So. Cal., 1918 English 

Barnes, Hubert Earl, Ph.B...A.M.> H.S. 

Redlands Univ., 1915 Philosophy 

Bartram, Clara Serena, A.B H.S. 

Occidental, 1909 English 

3atcheller, Helen N A.M. 

Leland Stanford Jr., A.B., 1915..Hist. 
Sateman, Florence M., A.B. ..A.M., H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 English 

Beardsley, Alice, Ph.B A.M. 

Univ. of Chicago, 1900 English 

leek, Mary Francis, A.B 

Pomona, 1917 English 

fenson, Chas. A., A. B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1916 Philosophy 

Sent, Avery, A.B. jj S 

, So - C ^l., 1917 ZZZSistory 

•ernstem, Jessie Edwards, A.B.... H.S. 

Vassar, 1913 German, Sociology 

terry, Abbie Catherine, A.B.. . H S 

So. Cal., 1912 Mathematics 

•issell, Kenneth M., A.B.. A M 

(1 Ya1 ^ "07 .^French 

•lanchard, Mary Willard A M 

Mt. Holyoke, 1907 History 

loomfield, Leonora G., A B H S 

So - Cal., 1917 iGerman 



Bonham, Ida Anita, A.M H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 English 

Bostwick, Hattie, Ph.B . 

Hamline Univ., 1917 German 

Bower, Halcia Eulalia, A.B : H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 English 

Boyd, Lillian C H.S., A.M. 

So. Cal., 1916 English 

Boyd, Meryl, A.B 

Vaparaiso Univ., 1912 English 

Brode, Alverda June, A.B...'. H.S. 

So. Cal., 1911 History 

Brodersen, Earl C. E., A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 History 

Brooberg, Ethel S., A.B 

Univ. of Minn., 1907 

Brown, Arthur C, A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1915 ,, Education 

Brown, Valeria, B.L H.S. 

Pomona, 1907 

Brubaker, Harriet M. A.M H.S. 

So. Cal., 1918 English 

Brubaker, Nicholas J., A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1915 History 

Bryson, J. A H.S. 

So. Cal., 1918 Education 

Bullock, A. Archibald, A.M 

Chicago Univ Education 

Bundy, Sarah Elizabeth, A.B A.M. 

Stanford Univ Sociology 

Burr, Harriett Kendall, A. B A.M. 

Northwestern, 1917 English 

Byam, Kathleen I., A.B A.M., H.S. 

Smith College, 1915 English 

Cahalan, Katherine Irene, A.B A.M. 

Univ. of S. D., 1915 Education 

Campbell, Fanchen Leota, A.B A.M. 

Northwestern, 1912 Latin 

Chaffee, Mary A., A.M H.S. 

Columbia. 1916 Sociology 

Chamberlain, Norma Irene, B.S H.S. 

Redlands, 1915.. Mathematics 

Clark, Archie B. Clifford, A.B A.M. 

Greenville, 1914 History 

Clark, Grace D., A.B H.S. 

Univ. of Colo., 1910 Latin 

Clark, Willis W., A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1916 Economics 



324 



University of Southern California 



Clency, Lois Mildred, A.M V-.H.S. 

Pomona, 1917 Biology 

Clifford, Charles Alfred, LL.B -.--- 

Mo. State Univ., 1910-Junsp., Hist. 
Clifford, George E., LL.B.. - A.M. 

Mo. State Univ., 1910-Junsp., Hist. 
Clifford, Lottie lone, A.B ~ ?± 

So. Cal., 1907 H ^ r / 

Clifton, Archie Roy, Ph.B A.M.. 

Univ of Wisconsin, 1908..Econ., Soc. 

Cook, Mable Elizabeth, A.B 

Occidental, 1916--, ---- }! - 

Cooper Lola Azella, ^— linglish 



Dunham, Inez Dorothy, A - B '"" "■-■"" 

So. Cal., 1916 Sociology 

Eaton, Ruth E., A.B. 

....H.S. 



.H.S 

So. Cal., 1914.::.-.- Chemistry 

Eisenberg, Kate, A.B. ■■££> 

So. Cal., 1912 Sociology, Leon. 

Erwin, Mach A -- --•-•-- "_ ""■ 

Ewing, J. Andrew, A.B A.M., H.S. 

So Cal., 1918 A E i UCa A tl M 

Eyer, Marguerite Knowlton, A.B A.M. 

Stanford, 1913 _-_■ _-H»tory 

Fahs, Mrs. Lucille Goddard, A.B 

Northwestern, 1911 --■■ 

Fergus, Mabel Elizabeth, A.M...-.-. 

Columbia, 1912 - History 

Feeler, William Henry, A.B ■"• : -f f ± 

' So. Cal., 1918 .-...- History 

Field, Eleanor Anne, B.S ~'"~: I \. ,' 

Columbia, 1915 Education 

Findlay, R. Bruce, A.B. 

Parsons College 191U 
Fisher, Lillian Estelle, A.B... 

c Sw'trci=..;me.i.,.in,o r u F *f,%r s -r^7,z:i"a 

Couch, VtaM? F -ESS. Unl .of Ckicfo. IMS H,..o,» 

Foster, Frances, A.B Fnelish 

Univ. of Alabama It 3 

Freed, Morris, A.B 

So. Cal., 1917 ----- 

Freydberg, Esther, A.B.. 

So. Cal., 1918 



A.M. 

History 



....H.S.* 
"A.M.* 



A.M. 

r Y ir S? 2 a ':zz-Engush 

So. Cal., i9i^ ......—— *.*_ tt <; 

)avi dson, Mildred Elizabeth H.S. 



of Cal Spanish 

A.B.. 



Davidso 

Univ. 
Davis, Alice , A.B '^.ZingUsh 

Pomona, 1909 H g 

D r S 'rf^l^' B Zic'onomics 

So. Cal., 1918- --- Tia Hg 

..Physics 



..H.S. 
Mathematics 

;; h.s, 

Germar 

Ftfkuoka!' H^maVlTof icon A.M 

rU Ke?o Gijiku Univ 1911 Economy 



_. Cal., 1918 
Davis, Edward Vincent, A.B 

So. Cal., iyio ^ g 

Stanford, "•<? Hist0ry 



Mt Holyoke, 

Gardner, Vivian, A.B -^jj 

Univ. of Cal., *yy—- ----- T nq 

George, Ethel Mendenhall, B. L-±l.s>. 
° Cadeton College, 1902 L~. -£■« 
, Newton B., A.B...A.M., I±«l 
..Educatio 



..Ho! 



Desmond, Harold Francis, A.B.. 

Dittenhauer, Esthe^' aSZ - Girdelstone, May ^^^^ja 

Western keserve, 1917 German ^ So. Cal., 1917-.-...^^ 



Ghormley, 

So. Cal., 1917 ■;•;-"• 

Gilson, Lewis Edward, A.B ;~-~j4| 

So. Cal, 1914 .-Cnemjfl 

May A.B.. 



Dodge, Alice Everett, A.B -H S. 

State Normal Kans History ^ ^ p] |; 

Dolly, Helen Edna, A. r> tt„:„ 



Goldsberger, Valeria,- A.B -.-" 

Northwestern, 1917 L"g ]l 



i 1915 .Econ., Sociology Syracuse Univ., 1891- 

So. Cal., iyib -.-"- , Grant, Ivy Mary, A.B... 



So. Cal., 1917.. 



Doughty, Julia, A.B. 

Univ of Denver, 1906 - ^ ie Marie 

Duffy, Elsie Edith ; A.B ^ CaU m? 

Univ. of Cal 



A.B.. 



1905.. 



Lati 
H. 

..Engli 
H. 

..Zooloj 



Catalogue of Students 



325 



Gross, Harry Edward, B.S H.S. 

College of City of New York, 1910 

Mathematics 

Gurney, Edith F. A.M 

Stanford 

Grimes, Louise, B.S H.S.* 

Columbia, 1917 Administration 

Guild, Ruth, A.B 

Ohio Wesleyan, 1914 Latin 

Guthridge, Russell M., A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 Mathematics 

Hagopian, John Edward, Ph.B H.S.* 

Yale, 1917 , 

Halsted, Lloyd D., A.B A.M., H.S. 

Univ. of Nebr., 1912....Latin, German 

Hanks, Rowena, B.S .H.S. 

Wilmington Coll. 1916....Chem. Biol. 

Harley, John Eugene, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 Mathematics 

Hart, Zella Pearl, A.B 

Grinnell, 1906 Greek, Lat., Eng. 

Hanson, Olaf, A.B A.M. 

St. Olaf Coll., 1916 English 

Harvey, Rowland H.S. 

So. Cal., 1918 History 

Hatfield, Clara Cecil, A.B... H.S. 

So. Cal., 1914 History 

Hawkins, Jessie Meredith, A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1916 History, English 

Hayden, Floyd Smith, A.M 

Pomona, 1912 English 

Helm, Marion Ruth, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 English 

Henningsen, Bertha Clarke, A.B H.S. 

Stanford, 1915 Mathematics 

Henricks, Andrew O., A.B., B.D...A.M. 

Nazarene Univ., 19l7 Philosophy 

Henry, Mabel Gertrude, A.B H.S. 

Stanford, 1915 Mathematics 

Hess, Mrs. Rose Cranston, A.B A.M. 

Univ. of Mich., 1898 German 

Hidden, Elizabeth, Ph.B A.M. 

Univ. of Redlands, 1912 ...History 

Higgins, Elmer, A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1916 Zoology 

Hilditch, Isabella Harrison, A.B. ..A.M. 

Mt. Holyoke, 1906 History 

Hills, Henry M., A.B A.M. 

Oberlin, 1898 Chemistry 

Himrod, Minnie A., A.B A.M., H.S.* 

Pomona, 1913 Hist., Rel. Ed. 

Hinckley, Ethel Marian, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 German 

Hinsdale, Ruth Jennie, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 English, Econ! 

Hinsdale, Willian, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1916 History 



Hohanshelt, Anna, A.B A.M. 

Univ. of Iowa German 

Holden, Ernest Lee, A.B 

Colorado College, 1902 

Hollingsworth, Glenn P., A.B H.S. 

Whittier College, 1917 Chemistry 

Hollingsworth, Josephine B., A.B. ..A.M. 

Tulare Univ, 1910 English 

Hopkins, Ella Rice, A.B H.S. 

Pomona College, 1916 Spanish 

Homrighausen, George A., A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1918 History 

Horton, Ernest Horace, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 History 

Howard, Mrs. Ethel Knoles, A.B 

Greenville, 1909 Greek 

Howard, James Arthur, A.B A.M. 

Occidental, 1917.. ..History, Economics 

Hutchison, Mrs. Emma R., A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1917 French 

Jackson, Frances E., A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1915 History 

Jacoby, Edgar H., A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1917 Chemistry 

Janes, Errol Prosser, A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1914 Econ., Sociology 

Jisoji. Tetsugai, A.B A.M. 

Imperial Univ., 1914 Philosophy 

Jordan, Wayne Early, A.B. ..A.M., H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 Economics 

Joslin, Phoebe lone, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1910 English 

Judd, Caroline Lucy, Ph.B A.M. 

Univ. of Chicago, 1905 History 

Kalliwoda, Gladys M., A.B...H.S., A.M. 

So. Cal., 1917 History, Sociology 

Kalliwoda, Helen, A.B 

So. Cal., 1915 French 

Keightley, Annie H.S.* 

Columbia Univ., 1907 English 

Kemp, Ethleen F., A.M 

Univ. of Minn, 1911 History 

Kennedy, Marjorie Rood, A.B H.S. 

Pomona, 1917 French 

Kersey, Cleon, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 Education 

Kirkman, Mrs. J. C. Fedson, B.S...H.S. 

Iowa State Univ., 1906 English 

Knott, James Proctor, A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1917 History 

Krag, Alexander, A. B A.M. 

Okla. Holiness College, 1913. .German 

Kuhnle, Helene Louise, A.B ..H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 German 

La Clair, Olive Rebekah, B.S H.S. 

So. Cal., 1912 Spanish 



326 



University of Southern California 



La Porte, Mrs. Lura Adams, A.B...H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 Rel. Ed., Sociol. 

Lee, Ethel, A.B - .......A.M. 

So. Cal., 1916 - f:r 1 ^ 

Lickley, Ernest, A.B A.M., H.S. 

So. Cal., 1916 -ATlfc? 

Lovejoy, Lena G., A.B A.M., H ^ 

So. Cal., 1917 — -J^ 

Lucas, Harry George, A.B...A.M., H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 History 

Lynch, Gertrude Florence, A.B. A.M. 

So. Cal., 1918 V--"- B °!r Q y 

MacDonald, Ruth Almina, A.B-.-H-.b. 

Occidental, 1917 "^ T^ 

Mackalip, Lois H., A.B A.M H S. 

Occidental, 1909 -History 

MacKay, Maryette Goodwin, A.B. A.M 

Wellesley, 1888 ?\7 

Martens, Freda Marie, A.B „....- A.M. 



So. Cal., 
Magnuson, 

So. Cal., 
Magnuson, 

So. Cal 



1918 Sociology 

Forster Alexis, A.B A.M. 

1914 Economics 

Mrs. Anna F., A.B H.S. 

1912 Mathematics 

Mason, Florence Gordon, 

So. Cal., 1918 ." Sociology 

McClees, Hazel Avis, A.B. &b. 

Pomona, 1917 Mathematics 

McDermot, Geo. Atkinson, A.B.. H.b. 

So. Cal., 1917 -.History 

McGorry, Jeannette Irene, A, 

So. Cal., 1912 English 

McKay, Isabella Jean, A.B ": A '™r 

So. Cal., 1914 - History 

McLean, Mary E., B.S ...--- H.b. 

Ohio University, 1912 Mathematics 

McLean, Robert Clay, B.S ....H.b. 

U of N. C, 1912....Elec. Engineering 

McLeod, James D. A.B... A.M. HS. 

Manitoba Univ., 1910....Classics,Latin 

McManis, Nancy Priscilla, A.B........ti.&. 

So. Cal., 1917 -— Botany 

McMaster, Robert Neer, B.S — »■»■ 

So. Cal., 1916 , """"^^ 

McNeese, Nora Lee, A.B A.M., H.b 

So. Cal., 1917 Enghsh 

McQueen, Annie Clinton 



Menn, Edna Irene, A.B "" HS * 

So. Cal., 1917 F^nch 

Meyer, Walter Jacob, B.S H.S. 

Kans. St. Normal, 1915 Chemistry 

Mercer, Harriet, A.M "" ll ' S : 

So. Cal., 1918 En g is c h 

Millar, Vera A., A.B -H.b. 

So. Cal., 1916 History 

Moore, Harry James, M.S A.M. 

So. Cal., 1914 Education 

Morgan, Alma Elizabeth, B.L H.S. 

Nazarene Univ., 1913 English 

Munson, Eunice Constance, A.B H.S. 

Univ. of Nebraska, 1917 Botany 

Murphy, Lucille Alice, A.B H.S. 

Univ. of Cal., 1917 German, Latin 

Nash, Mary Eleanor, A.B H.S. 

Baker University, 1912 Latin 

Nave, Hermione, B.L H.S. 

Ohio Wesleyan, 1897... - 

Neer, Francis Edwards, B.S H.S. 

Oregon Agri. Col., 1914....Agriculture 

Nicholl, Alice Heber, A.B H.S. 

Wellesley, 1906 . French 

r^T~~ Nichols, Alma Parker, A.B . 

So, Cal., 1917 English 

Nichols, Loyd Patterson, A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1911 Economics 

Nichols, Marjorie Parker, A.B A.M. 

Univ. of Minnesota, 1910 Latin 

„ v Nicholson, Marian Brindley, A.B...H.S. 

1 So. Cal., 1917 History, Sociology 

Nordahl, Mrs. Ruth Cliff, A.B., A.M 

So. Cal., 1912,......, - Ger ™ a c n 

Nordahl, Henry Alfred, A.B H-b. 

So. Cal., 1908 Ger ™ a " 

Olin, Anna Louise, A.B..... H.S. 

Oberlin, 1913 En |J. ls c n 

Olson, Emery Evans, A.B A.M., H.b. 

So. Cal., 1916....Economics ? Sociology 

O'Neil, Eileen, A.B ..-.-- H; S - 

So. Cal., 1917 ....Mathematics 

Osier, Florence Christine, B.S 

Mills College, 1916 «- --•-"-■ 

Ostlund, Emma Charlotte, A.B....- A.M. 

Kans. State Normal, 1911 German 

Palmer, Percy Edward, A.B....... H.b. 

So Cal., 1917 • Chemistry 

Paulson, Freda Ruth, A.B ~~' B ' S ' 

Univ. of Wash., 1910 English 

Parrish, Ada Lucile, A.B ....... H.5S 

So. Cal., 1916 - Soclo I°f7 

, A.B - A.M. 

1917 History 

Pearson, Ethel Lucile, B.S tif- 

Earlham College, 1905....Mathematica 



H.S. 
French 

Matlin, David Richard, A.B .....H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 Chen £ St o r S 

Mattley, Belle Kate, M.S.........-.--H.S. 

„°^T Berlin 1 A ^ ^rson, Em ™ * A " A - B ' 

^7^^ Whittier College, 

Maxfield, Beth Eloise, A.B -»- I J; S - 

Univ. of Nebraska, 1911 English 



Catalogue of Students 



327 



Peckham, Phyllis, A.M H.S. 

Stanford University, 1917 English 

Pennock, Emily Cynthia, A.M 

Carthage College, 1913 Latin 

Perkins, Voltaire D., A.B U.S., A.M. 

So. Cal., 1917 History 

Peterson, Mildred Elizabeth, A.B 

So. Cal., 1918 Latin, French 

Peterson, Payson Wells, Ph.B H.S.* 

Beloit College, 1892 Mathematics 

Phillips, Edna Muriel, A.B...H.S., A.M. 

So. Cal., 1917 History 

Phillips, Leslie A., A.B A.M. 

Univ. of Michigan, 1909 History 

Pierce, Mrs. Julia Vern, A.B ....A.M. 

So. Cal., 1915 English 

Pinkham, Ruth Varney, A.B H.S. 

Aurora College, 1917 English 

Purdum, Margaret, A.B H.S. 

Ohio Wesleyan, 1912 Latin 

Quinn, Katherine Frances, A.B H.S. 

Univ. of Cal., 1917 Botany 

Redfern, Alfred Sylvan, A.B., B.D...A.M: 
Northwestern, 1907..History, Pol. Sci. 

Reeve, Theresa Frances, A.B 

So. Cal., 1908 Latin 

Rehkop, Aaron John, A.B A.M. 

Central Wesleyan, 1913 Relig. Ed. 

Reinhard, Charles John, A.B H.S.* 

So. Cal., 1916 Education 

Richards, Ethel E., A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1915 History 

Richards, John A., B.S M.S., H.S.* 

Kas. St. Agr. Col., 1909 

Mech., Eng., Physics 

Riggins, Mrs. Mary Reeves, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1904 Latin, History 

Riley, Sally Clark, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1918 English 

Rinker, Turner Olive, A.B H.S. 

Univ. of Nebraska, 1901 English 

Ritter, Harvey Royer, A.B 

So. Cal., 1915 

Robb, Edrena George, A.B A.M. 

Geneva College, 1911 English 

Robinson, Mabel E., A.B A.M., H.S.* 

So. Cal., 1917 English 

Rodenberg, Wilhelmina M., A.B 

So. Cal., 1906 

Rowell, Virginia Fay, A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1916 __ English 

Rummel, Albert H., A.B H.S. 

National Normal, O History 

Russell, Mabel Edith, A.B H.S. 

Denver University, 1910..Mathematics 

Sakai, Sadakichi, A.B A.M. 

K«io Gijuka University Economics 



Sarnighausen, Olga A.M. 

So. Cal., 1916 History 

Savage, Henry I., B.S H.S. 

Ore. Agr. College, 1914 Agronomy 

Schnoor, Gladys Blanche, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1918 Mathematics 

Schoeffel, Raymond L., A.B 

Ore. Agr. College, 1917 

Seckler, Mrs. Elsie, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1915 German, Education 

Shaver, Chalmer B., A.B A.M., H.S. 

Pomona College, 1917 Mathematics 

Shearin, Nellie W., A.B 

So. Cal., 1917 Latin 

Shepardson, Anita Arline, A.B 

Stanford University, 1910 History 

Sherman, James Leonard, A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1917 Philosophy 

Shumway, Chas. W., A.B A.M. 

So. Cal., 1916 Philosophy 

Shields, Fred James, A.B A.M. 

Nazarene Univ., 1915 Philosophy 

Simpson, Myrtle, A.B H.S.* 

Univ. of Cal., 1916 

History, Political Science 

Sims, Julia Egge, A.B 

Whitworth Col., 1916..Hist., Soc. Sci. 

Smith, Grace Pepper, A.B 

Meridian Col., 1912..English, History 

Smith, William, A.M 

University of Chicago, 1912 

Snyder, Albert Byron, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917.... Economics 

Snyder, Elizabeth Louise, A.B H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 Mathematics 

Spofford, Erie Giltner, B.S H.S. 

Univ. of Nebraska, 1903..Mathematics 

Spooner, Mrs. Mabel Wright, A.B 

A.M., H.S.* 

Pomona, 1917 English 

Stephenson, Clara C, A.M 

So. Cal., 1915 English 

Stewart, Anna Abigail, A.B H.S. 

Pomona, 1917 Sociology 

Stuart, Irene, A.B 

Univ. of Cal., 1916*:. English 

Sutter, Nelle Josephine, A.B 

Cornell, 1916 

Svenson, Lillian Mathilda, A.B 

Pomona College, 1917 

Sykes, Ethel Pearl, A.B A.M. 

Univ. of Iowa, 1910 German 

Taake, Irene Blanche, A.B H.S.* 

Univ. of Iowa, 1910....Math., Biology 

Thoberg, Mabel, Ph. B 

Tenneson, Rosemary Eliza., A.B. ..A.M. 
So. Cal., 1917 Latin, English 



328 



University of Southern California 



Thornton, Eliz. Norburg, A.B .H.S. 

Lake Forest Col., 1911. -Math., Latin 

Tipton, Syril S., A.B., J.D H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917 Economics 

Tiss, A. L, A.B •--;--• 

Drake University, 1910 History 

Tritt, Jessie Amelia, A.M 

So. Cal., 1915 : ? lS }V 

Tullis, Olive Catherine, A.B..H.S., A.M. 

Occidental, 1917 English 

Uhl, Gretchen Elisabeth, A.B H.S. 

Stanford, 1917 History, German 

Van Deusen, Marjorie H., A.B A.M. 

Vassar, 1904 iV^Hf 

Van Wyck, William, A.B H.S., A.M. 

So. Cal., 1917 "---r^fl 1 ? 

Vivien, Robert Evans, A.B...A.M., H.b. 

So. Cal., 1917 Chemistry 

Wahl, Margaret Lydia, A.B A.M. 

Univ. of Wis., 1916....Romance Lang. 
Wahrenbrock, Ervin Earl, A.B..--A.M. 

So. Cal., 1916 r.? 10 ^? 

Walker, Sydnor H., A.B A.M., H.b. 

Vassar, 1913 Economics 

Walters, Jennie May, A.B -H.b. 

De Pauw, 1916 Latin 

Warner, Mrs. Emily Clark, A.M.— ...... 

Univ. of Cal., 1892 Eng., Lit. 

Watson, Homer K., A.B -H.b. 

So. Cal., 1917 S S C1 °i°ff r 

Watson, Walter T., A.B H.S., A.M. 

So. Cal., 1917 Mathematics 

Webber, Fern M., A.B — 

Knox College, 1909 



Welborn, Maida, A. B -A.M. 

So. Cal., 1915 Sociology 

Wellborn, Mildred, A.B -A.M. 

So. Cal., 1912 History 

Wendt, Harvey -■-- -■••; 

West, Edward Earle, B.S H.b. 

Mercer University £"c"« 

Wheeler, Mrs. Mabel R., A.B H.b. 

State Normal, Kans Soc, Educa. 

White, Mrs. Merta, A.B A.M., H.S. 

So. Cal., 1918 History 

Whitlock, Maud, B.S 

Columbia, 1903 Education, English 

Wilkes, Mary Bernice, A.B - 

So. Cal., 1916 -- -^oology 

Wilkinson, Hazel C, A.B AM., H.S. 

So. Cal., 1917—Economics, Sociology 

Williams, Elric, A.M — • 

Univ. of Illinois, 1903 Chemistry 

Williams, Reynold Scott, Ph.B A.M. 

Nazarene Univ., 1915 Philosophy 

.Wilson, Jean Hazel, A.B.— -A.M., H.S 

~ Occidental, 1916 Eng hsh 

Wilson, Norris Remington, A.B.—A.M. 

So. Cal., 1917 Education 

Witherell, Grace Mariana, A.B H.b. 

So. Cal., 1917 Zoology 

Woods, Walter A., B.S .......... ----- 

Penn. State Col., 1904—Mathematics 

Wright, Bertha C 

Zander, Lucille E., A.B ... 

So. Cal., 1911 German 

Zinn, Cleo Task, B.S ----•• 

Univ. of Cal., 1914 Soils 



Catalogue of Students 



329 



SUMMER SESSION, 1917 



Abbott, Mary Beth (A.B.) 
Adams, Adda S. 
Adler, Irene (Bach, of Mus.) 
Aid, Frank D. 
Aiken, Mildsed (A.B.) 
Albrecht, Charlotte 
Alfred, Helen Lillian 
Alexander, Evalyn V. 
Allen, Howard D. 
Althouse, Katherine Kent 
Alvord, Grace Lucile 
Ames, Walter Irving 
Anderson, Mrs. Alfa Wood 
Anderson, Cora Ingeborg 
Anderson, Rembert Cassels 
Andrews, Eliza 
Arata, Winfield Hector 
Arias, Maria 

Armando, Cloni Sanchez 
Armstrong, Beatrice 
Asher, Katherine Lucile 
Asnon, Edith E. 
Austin, Merritt Eugene 
Bachus, Grace Constance 
Badenoch, Arthur Hill 
Bailey, Margaret A. 
Baker, Ben Byrd 
Baker, Edna Berneice 
Baker, Maree 
Baker, Marietta 
Baker, Marion Terry 
Baldwin, Louis Judson 
Ball, Edward 
Ball, Louis 

Bancroft, Irving Reed 
Barcroft, Hattie Jane 
Barlow, Genevieve 
Barnes, H. E. 
Barnes, Jessie B. 
Bartlett, Emma May 
Bartram, Clara Serena (A.B.) 
Bartruff, Zoe Sara (A.M.) 
Bates, George Brigham 
Bass, Ethel Marie 
Bassett, Alberta 
Baughman, Julia S. 
Beecher, John 
Belieu, Leila Grace 
Bennett, Gladys A. 
Benson, Charles (A.B.) 
Berry, Abbie 
Berry, Bertha 
Berthot. Stephanie A. 
Bertram, Jessie Anna 



Bickenbach, Clara Sturgis 

Billingsley, Ethel Elizabeth 

Bissell, Mrs. Josephine Jayne 

Bissiri, Alfie 

Bissiri, Amelia 

Blake, Mabel Ann 

Bland, H. Maud 

Blasdel, Gilbert Cox 

Bloom, Augusta 

Bloom, Mercedes Elizabeth 

Bloom, Mrs. Selma T. 

Bollinger, Lela Gertrude 

Bonham, Ida Anita (B.L.) 

Boor, Edith 

Bostwick, Hattie 

Bouchard, Helen O'Dell 

Bouton, Edward 

Bovard, Warren Bradley 

Bowen, Louise 

Bowen, Mary S. 

Bower, Catherenebell Jeannette 

Bower, Cora R. 

Bower, Halcia Eulalia 

Bower, Victress 

Boyd, Lillian C. (A.B.) 

Bradley, Millie Parsons 

Brethauer, Gertrude Florence 

Breed, Lillian Vida 

Briois, Leonard F. D. 

Britton, Anna Ethel 

Brodersen, Carl C. E. 

Brown, Anita 

Brown, Arthur Meade 

Brown, Valeria B. (B.S.) 

Browning, Olive Rogers (Ph.B.) 

Brubaker, Harriet Mercer 

Brubaker, Martha M. 

Brubaker, Nicholas J. 

Bruce, Henry W. 

Brydolf, Nella J. 

Buck, Leah Pearl 

Buckley, Edmund Thomas (B.S.) 

Buehner, Valentine 

Buell, Raymond Leslie 

Bullock, A. Archibald (B.S., M.S.) 

Bullock, Frederick William 

Bullock, Raymond 

Bunker, Jean Paul 

Burgess, Myrtle Louise 

Burke, John C. 

Burnham, Alice Alden 

Buxton, Ruth Alta 

Byerts, Nettie 

Byrkit, Elizabeth 



330 



University) of Southern California 



Byrne, Loretta Pctronilla 

Callaway, Ezra Samuel 

Campbell, Fanchen Leota (A.B.) 

Campbell, Jessie Ruth (A.B.) 

Campbell, Margaret M. 

Campbell, Roy S. 

Cauthorn, Leah 

Cantor, Jacob Joseph 

Carey, Katherine Lee (A.B.) 

Carpenter, James R. 

Carr, Ira 

Carr, Charlotta 

Carrick, Ida Eleanor 

Carroll, Frederic Harrington 

Carter, Artie Mason 

Cartwright, Alice 

Cartwright, Nellie M. 

Carver, Doris Margaret 

Casey, Helen V. 

Cass, Bernice 

Cehrs, Carrie May (A.B.) 

Chaffee, Leila Beryl 

Chamberlain, L. Clark 

Champion, John H. W. 

Champion, Sadie A. 

Chandler, Moses W. 

Chapin, Anna Dewey 

Chase, Mrs. Florence Zoe 

Chilberg, Neva 

Choate, Dorothy 

Chrisman, Edna Gertrude 

Chung, Elbert Y. 

Clark, Jessie Lee 

Clark, Leo 

Clark, Lillian M. 

Clark, Lola Bliss 

Clark, Ray Henry 

Clark, Vivian 

Clarke, Grace D. (A.B.) 

Clayton, John Henry 

Cleghorn, W. T. 

Clency, Lois Mildred 

Clemmens, Margaret 

Clifford, George Edward 

Cochrane, Elvis Elroy 

Coddington, Carrie Lucia (A.B.) 

Cole, Perry O. 

Collins, A. Harvey (A.M.) 

Collison, John Clyde 

Colver, Mrs. Mary C. (A.B.) 

Compton, Henrietta 

Conly, Edwin Thomas 

Connor, Edith O. 

Cook, Harold William 

Cook, Zena Eulon 

Cooper, Belle 

Cooper, Lola Agella (A.B.) 



Cowsert, Vernon Read 

Cory, John (A.B.) 

Cory, Margaret Emma 

Cowan, Angus Barbara 

Cox, James Cecil 

Crabtree, E. Katherine 

Crandall, Ruth Jessie 

Cranon, Israel 

Crapser, Jessamine 

Creyts, Thelma Dorothy 

Croissant, Albert (A.B.) 

Crouch, Virginia Frances 

Cunningham, Mary Aiken 

Curl, Maud M. 

Curran, Mabel 

Curtis, Marie Elyce 

Czerniawski, Emil 

Dando, Susie May 

Danks, Vina F. 

Danielson, Arthur C. 

Daniels, Mrs. Anne B. (A.M.) 

Daniels, Edith 

Davenport, Lucile 

Davids, Elizabeth 

Davids, Ina Margaret 

Davids, Mark A. 

Davidson, Mildred Elizabeth 

Davies, Christine A. 

Davies, Henrietta A. • 

Davis, Earl D. 

Davis, Edward (A.B.) 

Davis, Eleanor Madeline 

Davis, Ida Elizabeth (A.M.) 

Davis, Thomas H. 

Davison, Ida Belle 

Denton, Van L. (B.S.) 

Derby, Jesse Raymond (A.M.) 

Dermont, Margarette Adah (A.B.) 

Desmond, Harold Francis (A.B.) 

De Vault, Nellie May 

Dick, Ona V. 

Dillenback, Ruth 

Dixon, Anne 

Dlouhy, Ruth Sweet 

Dodge, Charles Anderson 

Dodson, Ellen MacKenzie 

Dollay, Helen Edna 

Douglas, Maud E. 

Douglass, Robert Herschel 

Douthit, Frances Laura 

Drake, Grace Wallace 

Dubin, Jennie 

Duer, Iva Bee 

Duffy, Elsie E. 

Dukes, Harry Sloan (B.L.) 

Duncan, Carol Adelaide 

Dunham, Inez Dorothy 



Catalogue of Students 



331 



Dunster, Mary Elizabeth 

Dyer, Robert Edgar 
Eadie, Helen M. 

Eaton, Ruth Elizabeth 

Eddleman, Margaret O. 

Edgecomb, Flora Torrey 
Edwards, Edith Eunice 

Eisenbert, Kate 

Elivin, Gertrude 

Enenkel-Arteaga William Alexander 

Erickson, Maude Weaver 

Espy, M. Eana 

Espy, Frances Anna 

Evans, Marian 

Ewing, J. Andrew 

Ewing, Bessie Ionia 

Farmer, Edward McNeil 

Feeler, William Henry 

Fellows, Lloyd Walker 

Fergus, Mabel E. 

Files, Jessie Ema 

Findlay, Robert Bruce (A.B.) 

Fink, Georgia Stevens 

Fisher, Flora Marie 

Fisher, Lillian Estelle 

Fisher, Pearl B. (A.B.) 

Fitzpatrick, Harold Pierce 

Flagg, Etta Proctor 

Fleishman, Josephine Breedlore 

Fleming, Elizabeth Agnes 

Fletcher, Albie Naomi (Ph.B.) 

Fletcher, Helen Frances 

Foster, Frances (A.B.) 

Fouchaux, Madeleine Marie 

Fowler, Esther Elizabeth 

Fox, Alice Eleanor 

Frahm, Frederick W. (D.D.S.) 

Frankenfield, Lorraine 

Franks, Grace A. G. 

Freed, Morris 

Freeland, James K. 

French, Mary Louisa 

Freydberg, Esther 

Furber, Marion Ruth 

Gamble, Mrs. Leo May 

Gant, Minnie 

Gaines, Mrs. Lucy Matthews 

Gard, Clare De Wolfe 

Gardiner, Dorothy Margaret 

Gardner, Vivien (A.B.) 

Garvin, Lenell Ethlyn 

Gates, Mrs. E. C. 

Geiger, Essie 

Gentner, John 

George, Edna 

George, Ethel Mendenhall (B.L.) 

Gerber, Raymond Clyde 



Ghormley, Newton Baxter 

Gibbs, Nina Esther 

Gifford, Gertrude M. (A.M.) 

Gilbert, Hazel J. 

Gillies, Marjorie Jeanette 

Gilroy, Ella B. 

Gilson, Bessie Louise 

Gilson, Dorothy 

Girdlestone, May (A.B.) 

Gleiss, Gladys 

Glick, Annette 

Glidden, Lois Viola (B.L.) 

Glines, Dora Pankey 

Goodale, Helena May (A.B.) 

Goodrich, Mrs. Mildred M. 

Goodwin, Paul 

Goulah, Ida M. (Ph.B., A.M.) 

Gould, Roscoe 

Goulet, Frank X. 

Grace, Mary Ethelyn 

Graham, J. Estelle 

Grant, Gladys North 

Grant, Ivy Mary 

Grant, Ruth Gordon 

Gray, Alice C. 

Gray, Austin Vincent 

Gray, Helen S. 

Gray, M. Sidney 

Gray, Mabel Townsend 

Gray, Sarah Elizabeth 

Green, Faith Amy 

Greene, Gertrude E. 

Greenshaw, Ursula Adelaide 

Greenwood, Barbara 

Griggs, Elizabeth 

Grimes, Louise R. (B.S.) 

Grundy, Edith F. (A.M.) 

Gross, Harry Edward 

Groves, Mary Olive 

Grua, Esther Salma 

Gunning, Alma Elizabeth 

Haber, Phil 

Haight, R. L. 

Haisch, Jonn Howard 

Hall, Mrs. Florence Gordon 

Hall, Mabel Gilbert (A.B.) 

Hamer, Joseph W. (A.M.) 

Hammond, Maud W. 

Hampton, Frances Wilhoit 

Handy, Martha Pauline 

Handy, Truman Bishop 

Hanley, Katherine Gertrude (A.B.) 

Hanson, Edith J... 

Hardy, Marjorie 

Harkness, Elizabeth Jean 

Harris, Ella May 

Hart, Victor Key 



332 



University of Southern California 



Hart, Zella Pearl (A.B.) 

Harvey, Rowland Hill 

Harvey, Walter Newton 

Hatfield, Clara C. 

Haupt, Dorothea 

Hawkins, Anna 

Hawkins, Jessie Meredith 

Hawkins, John Roland 

Hawkins, Walter R. G. 

Hayden, Floyd Smith 

Hayes, Abigail 

Healey, Herbert Lester (A.B.) 

Hearst, Nora H. 

Heintz, Eva C. Russell 

Heckmann, Evelyn Bruce 

Helm, Mrs. Florence Gould 

Helm, Henrietta S. 

Helm, Marion 

Hempel, Catharine 

Henderson, Clifford William 

Henningsen, Bertha Clara (A.B.) 

Henley, Katherine B. (A.B.) 

Henry, Mabel Gertrude 

Hensel, Emma H. 

Herbert, Alvin Arthur 

Herrell, M. Alphade 

Hess, Rose Cranston (Ph.B.) 

Hewitt, George W. 

Heywood, Ralph Walter 

Hichborn, Elva 

Hidden, Elizabeth 

Higgins, Elmer 

Higgins, Lena 

Hill, Henrietta 

Hill, Jessie Louise 

tfiil, Marion 

Hillier, Irene Carr 

Hills, Henry Merritt 

Hinsdale, Willian 

Hirschfeld, Ellis 

Hiskey, Harold Vernon 

Hodge, Ruby M. 

Hodgin, George Arnold 

Hoenshell, Hattie (A.M.) 

Hofert, Esther Lida 

Hogin, Mabel 

Holcomb, Ruth 

Holden, Ernest Lee (A.B.) 

Holdzkom, Bess 

Hollabaugh, Julian Graeme 

Hollingsworth, Glenn Preston (A.B.) 

Holmes, Olive Mary 

Holzheid, Florence Bertha 

Homrighausen, George A. 

Honner, Robert A. 

Hood, Mary Katheryn 

Hopkins, Ernest Jerome 



Hoppe, A. Katherine 

Horsman, Laura Harriet 

Houk, George D. 

Houston, John 

Hovey, Margaret Thorne 

Hovey, Nellie M. 

Howard, Mrs. Ethel Knoles (A.B.) 

Howard, J. Arthur (A.B.) 

Howlett, Maud P. 

Hubbard, Edith May 

Huff, Wm. Frederick 

Hull, Clara Ruth 

Hunt, Ethelwyn Juliet 

Hunter, Mrs. Adda Wilson 

Hunter, Iva Fern 

Hunter, Rev. Wm. A. 

Hurlburt, Ethel 

Husar, Leonard Goodwin 

Husted, Myra Irene (B.M.) 

Hutchison, Emma Reynolds 

Huxtable, Richard Byron 

Hyatt, Mary E. 

Irving, Emily Pray 

Iske, Mrs. Ruth Martens 

Tversen, Ida Christine 

Jackson, Bertha Lee (B.S.) 

Jackson, Elizabeth Shumate 

Jackson, Frances Eugenia 

Janes, Errol Prosser 

Jantzen, Daniel F. 

Jeancon, Etta C. 

Jenkins, Mary Florence 

Jenness, Kathleen Jeanette 

Jewel, Arthur Rice 

Johnson, Amelia Caroline 

Johnson, Anna Bee 

Johnson, Golda Leona 

Johnson, Grace Gertrude 

Johnson, Marguerite Henrietta 

Johnson, Rosa 

Jones, Bertram Merrill 

Jones, Ida Isabella 

Jones, John Paul 

Jones, Mrs. Olga E. 

Jones, Mrs. S. T. 

Jordan, Wayne Early 

Judson, Mrs. Louise Foster 

Jund, Trinedad 

Kalliwoda, Gladys May (A.B.) 

Kalliwoda, Helen (A.B.) 

Kast, Emma Johanna 

Keese, Harriet Elma 

Keightley, Annie (B.S.) 

Keller, Mrs. Helen 

Kelleher, James V. (LL.B.) 

Kemp, Etheleen F. (A.M.) 

Kemp, John Franklin (A.B.) 



Catalogue of Students 



333 



Kendall, Joseph Spcnce 

Kendrick, Raymond Henderson (B.S.) 

Kennedy, Mrs. A. Theresa 

Kenny, Robert Walker 

Kent, Arthur Harold 

Kern, Helen 

Kersey, Cleon 

Kersey, Vierling 

Keyes, Phyllis Lucy 

Kinder, Evelyn C. 

King, Eva 

Kipp, Warren Augustus, Jr. 

Kirk, Esther Eluetta 

Kirkes, Andrea McClain 

Kirkman, Johanna Fedson 

Kling, Katherine 

Knopp, Gideon D. 

Krag, Alexander 

Kuhnle, Helen L. 

LaGrange, Helen Margaret 

LaGrange, Margaret C. 

LaGrange, Mary Barnes 

Landregan, Gladys Evelyn 

Lane, Edith Lucinda 

Lasswell, Ruth Gertrude 

LaTouche, Myrtle 
Leadingham, Grace Dorward 
Learned, Marjorie Comfort 

Lee, Ettie 
Lefevre, Ora Linn 
Legge, Laura J. 
Lehr, Mary H. 
Leick, Lucie M. 
Leonhardy, Alma 
Lewis, Winnie D. 
Liege, Lillian Marie 
Lickley, Ernest Jameson 
Life, Cora Mae 
Liggett, Hazel Mary 
Lindley, Francis Haynes 
Lindsley, Mary Elizabeth 
Linn, Mary Seaman 
Litzaw, Josephine 
Livingston, Mae 
Lochman, Bernice Waters 
Locke, Bessie E. (B.M.) 
Lodwick, Deca 
Lodwick, Elizabeth 
Logie, Helen Corita 
Loly, Kathleen Dorothy 
Longyear, Ruth Bailey 
Loomis, Mrs. Nina Lee 
Lossing, Laverna Lucy 
Lovejoy, Lena Goldsmith 
Lovejoy, Ora A. 
Lowell, Florence Robinson 
Lower, Louise Eleanor 



Lowery, John David 

Lucas, Harry G. 

Lutz, Elsie Henrietta 

Lux, Catherine Claire (A.B.) 

Lysle, Heloise 

McCarthy, Irene Mary 

McDaniel, Ida (Ph.B.) 

McDaniel, Jean 

McDonald, Annie Laurie 

McDonald, George James 

McDowell, Letonia 

McEuen, Fred L. 

McEuen, William Wilson 

McFadden, Isabel 

McGinness, Venesia Beall 

McGonigle, Rose Vibiana (A.M.) 

Mcllrath, Hazel Alice 

Macintosh, Eleanor Christina 

McKay, Isabella J. 

McKenna, Sara Beatrice 

McKinney, Elizabeth Perry 

McKinnon, Mrs. Ida B. K. 

McLean, Irene 

McLean, Mary Elizabeth (B.S.) 

McLean, Robert Day (B.S.) 

McLeod, James Dudley (A.B.) 

McMaster, Robert M. 

MacMillan, Jean 

McMore, Blanche Aileen 

McNeely, Mabel Ada 

McNeese, Nora Lee 

Macauley, Blanche Ethel 

MacDonald, Ruth A. (A.B.) 
MacDonald, Esther Mary 
Macfarland, Winifred (Ph.B.) 
Mach, Joseph J. 
MacKalip, H. Lois (A.B.) 
Mackenzie, Helen C. 
Madden, Ella R. 
Madden, Mary M. 
Magie, Gertrude Frances 
Magnuson, Mrs. Anna Mary 
Mahan, Henry Weston, Jr. 
Mahan, Jessie 
Malcom, John S. 
Maloney, Gertrude Clara 
Manley, Edna T. H. 
Markley, H. H. 
Marleau, Martha Pearl 
Marston, Bert 
Martin, Coe Marion 
Mason, Florence Gordon 
Mason, Grace Z. 
Masters, Leonard Cuthbert 
Mathews, L. Edith 
Mead, Amy Berlin (A.B.) 
Mead, Charles Lester 



334 



University) of Southern California 



Meinecke, Joseph Bertrum 

Merkel, Flora 

Meyer, Walter J. (B.S.) 

Meyerl, Elisabetha 

Mickey, Paul Elwood 

Millar, Vera A. A. 

Miller, Bernice Beth 

Miller, Glen Ira 

Miller, Edwin Woods 

Miller, Ross V. 

Milligan, Nancy Gertrude 

Mitton, Elizanne Belle (Ph.B.) 

Modesti, Phinoclade 

Moore, Celeste Nettleton 

Moore, Emma A. 

Moore, Harry James 

Moore, Rutherford Drummond 

Morley, Alice Louise 

Morrell, Amy 

Morse, Helen F. 

Mosseman, Adele M. 

Mount, Florence Duvall 

Mulder, Ernest 

Mullen, Anna Beulah 

Murphy, Lucille Alice 

Murray, Elva Elizabeth 

Nagel, Erma Johanna 

Nagle, Mary I. 

Nathan, Robert Florance, Jr. 

Nau, Converse 

Nave, Hermoine (B.S.) 

Neer, Francis Edwards 

Nesty, Darling Elody 

Newbold, Austin L. 

Nicoll, Mrs. Alice Heber 

Nichols, Alma Parker 

Nichols, Mrs. Mora Edella 

Nichols, Marjorie Parker 

Nicholson, Marian 

Nilsson, Pehr Teodor 

Nixon, Alta 

Nowrey, Joseph Edward, Jr. 

O'Connor, Zena Catherine 

O'Donoghue, Mary Lang 

Oestern, Rose M. 

Ogborn, Gladys Henrietta 

Ogden, Florence McNeal 

Olin, Anna Louise (A.B.) 

Olmsted, Mary Warner 

Olsen, Bess 

Oneal, Charles Herbert 

Orcutt, Eunice Marguerite 

Ormsby, Anna C. (B.O.) 

Osborne, Mrs. Alice Phillips 

Osthund, Emma Charlotte 

Oyler, Maude 

Painter, Ruby 



Palmer, Emma May 

Palmer, Percy E. 

Pape, Myrtle Harrison 

Parker, Laurel 

Partridge, Silas Merritt 

Patten, Frances Ada 

Patterson, Minnie W. 

Patton, Stanley F. 

Paulson, Freda Ruth (A.B.) 

Paxton, Jessie K. 

Payette, Clara M. 

Peek, Marian L. 

Pennock, Emily Cynthia (B.S., A.M.) 

Perkins, Voltaire Duback (A.B.) 

Persons, Grace Lucile 

Peterson, Etta 

Petro, Grace R. 

Phelps, Gladys 

Phillips, Amy Dupont 

Phillips, Edna Muriel (A.B.) 

Phillips, Jean 

Phillips, Leslie Arlington 

Pierce, Charles Edward 

Pinkham, Ruth Varney (A.B.) 

Plummer, Louis Ellsworth 

Pollard, Mrs. Genia M. 

Port, Edna Ruth 

Potter, Mrs. Nellie Isabelle 

Powell, Muriel Edwina (A.B.) 

Preisker, Nora (B.L.) 

Preston, Linda May E. 

Prevost, Edna Elizabeth (A.B.) 

Price, Edwin 

Pride, Katherine Virginia 

Pulham, May 

Purdum, Margaret (A.B.) 

Quayle, Mary E. 

Ramboz, Ina W. 

Rankin, Grace Louise 

Rankin, Ida M. 

Rathwell, Thomas Raymond 

Ray, Frances Elizabeth 

Rayner, Lillian R. 

Reams, Lorena 

Reavis, Lorna 

Redfern, Alfred S. (A.B., B.S., B.D.) 

Reed, Lawson 

Reed, Grace Ebey 

Reed, Margaret Imogene 

Reeve, Theresa Frances 

Reeves, Claude L. 

Reinhard, C. J. 

Reith, Hortense Charlotte 

Reynolds, Agnes Agatha (B.S.) 

Rhodes, Clara M. 

Richards, John A. 

Richardson, David Bonner 



Catalogue of Students 



335 



Richardson, Mrs. Florence 

Richardson, Mrs. Vivian Evyln 

Richerich, Anna 

Riddle, Mrs. Sara M. 

Riggins, Mrs. Mary Reeves 

Riley, Sallie Clark 

Rinker, Turner O. (A.B.) 

Ritchey, Martha 

Rittenour, Floj'd Isaac 

Roark, Onah Burdette 

Robb, Edrena George 

Roberts, Grace L. 

Roberts, Lucile Gertrude 

Robertson, Molly Devereaux 

Roberson, Ury Homer 

Roberts, Mrs. J. B. 

Rodenberg, Wilhimine Margareta 

Roe, Marinita B. 

Rogers, Berdella 

Rogers, Islay Caroline (A.B.) 

Roos, Anna 

Ross, Donald A. 

Rothwell, Y. P. (A.M.) 

Rowe, Cecil 

Rowell, Virginia Fay 

Rugg, Mabel Kelsey (A.B.) 

Rummel, Albert H. (A.B.) 

Russell, Ellen L. 

Russell, Eva Margaret 

Russell, Ruth Davis 

Ryan, Frank Joachim 

Ryckoff, Mollie 

Rykoff, Sarah 

Salmon, Mrs. Grace McCrary 

Samaniego, Arthur Valentine 

Satoh, S. (A.B.) 

Savage, Henry T. 

Sawyer, Elizabeth Barnes 

Scharf, Keil J. 

Schirm, Josephine 

Schlueter, Mrs. Kate A. 

Schneider, Elsa Laura 

Scholz, Pauline Marie 

Schopbach, Leonora (A.B.) 

Schout, Rubetta Elizabeth 

Schweitzer, Rose E. 

Schwindt, Wm. A. (A.B.) 

Scott, Edith Oriole 

Scott, Margaret M. 

Scroggs, Margaret McCandless 

Sibeliis, Carl Melville 

Seckler, Elsie 

Seiler, Albert 

Serviss, Minnie S. 

Seymour, G. Athol 

Seymour, Mrs. Sophie (B.M.) 

Shankland, Sarah E. 



Sharp, Bernice Muriel 

Sharp, Helen Augusta 

Sharpe, Gladys 

Shaver, Chalmer Brunsborough (A.B.) 

Shearin, Nellie W. 

Shepardson, Anita Arline, (A.B.) 

Shepherd, Emily 

Shriver, Mrs. Myra L. 

Silvermane, Florenze Katharine 

Simmons, Benjamin Coleman 

Simpson, Myrtle (A.B.) 

Skinner, Edna Eugenia 

Slater, Mabel Elizabeth 

Sloan, Iowa Myrtle 

Smith, Mrs. A. 

Smith, Cordelia Madison 

Smith, Ella Dixon 

Smith, Grace Pepper (A.B.) 

Smith, Margaret Davis 

Smith, William 

Snowden, Mildred Emma 

Snyder, Albert Byron 

Spafford, Erie Giltner (B.S.) 

Spaulding, D. M. 

Spayd, Mary Alice 

Spormann, Otto F. 

Spiinger, Florence Helen 

Sproul, Joseph Plummer 

Sprung, Edna W. 

Stafford, Helen Mary 

Staggers, Mrs. Nola Landrum 

Stanley, Jane 

Stapp, Melvina 

Stearns, Alice Day 

Stechert, Ottilie Marie 

Steen, Emerald Jasper 

Stephens, Nellie Eva (A.B.) 

Stephenson, Clara C. 

Stephenson, Mabel 

Sterry, Nora 

Stevens, Roxana 

Stewart, John Speaker 

Stillman, Louis R. 

Stillwell, Bettina 

Stock, Joseph Wendell 

Stone, Mrs. Mildred 

Strang, Grace Orpah 

Strange, Mrs. Louise Schuler 

Street, Bernard (B.S.) 

Struthers, Mrs. Alice 

Stuart, Irene (A.B.) 

Sullivan, Margaret H. 

Sykes, 'Ethel P. 

Taggart, Martha 

Taylor, Robert J. 

Taylor, Rose Edith 

Tenneson, Rosemary Elizabeth (A.B ) 



336 



University of Southern California 



Thayer, Violet M. 

Thias, Mrs. D. Dell (A.B.) 

Thoberg, Ina Mabel 

Thomas, Courtney Cooper 

Thomas, Grace Margaret (A.B.) 

Thomas, Margaret Holloway 

Thompson, E. G. 

Thompson, Jane Mary 

Thompson, Vaughn N. 

Thornton, Elizabeth Norbury 

Thornton, Florence H. 

Thurber, Floyd Frederick 

Tibbetts, Alice Baltzell 

Tiss, A. D. (Ph.B.) 

Tomlinson, Irene Florence 

Tower, Emily 

Trotter, John Crawford 

Tucker, Mary Ann (A.B.) 

Tullis, Olive Catherine (A.B.) 

Tweedy, Jennie Shaffer 

Twomey, Serena M. 

Tyler, Nellie Davidson 

Van Aken, Gertrude Elizabeth 

Van Deusen, Marjorie Helen (A.B.) 

Van Vleet, Ruth C. 

VanWyck, William (A.B.) 

Vaughan, Isabel L. 

Vawter, Nellie 

Visel, Ruth Angele 

Wadsworth, Gladys Fern 

Wadsworth, Madaline Ethel 

Wadsworth, Phebe Ray 

Wagner, Nell B. 

Wagner, Winona 

Wakeman, Ellen Augusta 

Walberg, Harold Emmanuel 

Walden, Anna W. 

Waldron, John H. 

Waldron, Rose Edith 

Wallace, F. Elinor 

Walters, Jennie May 

Walton, Elisabeth Neil 

Warner, Mrs. Emily Clark (A.M.) 

Warren, Eiffel 

Waite, Mrs. Rebekah 

Watson, Alice Erwin 

Weatherhead, Mrs. Mabel 

Webber, William T. 

Wellbron, Mildred >*■*,» 

Wentworth, Mary Malvina (A.M.) 

Wentzel, George William 



Wernlund, Alice 

Wetherby, Marguerite Edith 

West, Edward Emile (B. S.) 

Wheeler, Carleton Ames 

Wheeler, Mrs. Mabel Ranney (A.B.) 

White, George Cossitt 

White, Mrs. Merta 

White, Mildred Alma 

White. Rowena Hudlow 

Whiting, Lillian Viola 

Whitlock, Frances Jeannette 

Whitlock, Maud 

Whittell, Florence Emma 

Whittock, Lida T. 

Wichman, Pauline Martha 

Wichelmann, Mattie L. 

Wickersham, Jessie Baker 

Widman, Norman 

Wiebers, Hortense Evelyn 

Wild, Annah Anderson 

Wilke, Julian Otto 

Wilkes, Josephine E. 

Wilkes, Mary Bernice (A.B.) 

Will, Arthur Joseph 

Willett, Hugh Carey (A.M.) 

Williams, Elrick (A.M.) 

Williams, Louise A. 

Willits, Clara M. 

Wilmot, Julie Emma 

Wilson, Eric Randolph 

Wilson, Mrs. Mamie Ellis 

Wilson, Norris Rennington 

Winter, Charlotte Lucille 

Winterrowd, Ruby Mayme 

Wisler, Mrs. Emma C. 

Witherell, Edith Hope (A.B.) 

Witherell, Grace Miriam. (A.B.) 

Wonder, Irena Violet 

Wood, Pauline Vollmer 

Woods, Cecile 

Woods, Walter Allen 

Woodworths, Clyde Cyril 

Woolwine, Clare Wharton 

Wright, Corinne King 

Wyatt, Jane Dillon 

Yock, Florence 

Young, Mae S. 

Zinn, Cleo Jack (B.S.) 

Ziegler, Amy W. 

Zoffman, Christine 



Catalogue of Students 



337 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



FRESHMEN 



Ahlem, Miss Judith Amelia 
Babcock, Lewis George 
Clayton, John Henry 
Cunningham, William Clement 
*Dahlgren, Roland Walfred 
Dickey, Clarence Dudley, Jr. 
Fulmer, Charles Currier 
Goldberg, Albert Tobias 
Grant, Reginald Franklin 
*Pearson, Emmet Albert (A.B.) 
*Perry, Harold Stanley 
Scholl, Miss Marguerite Julia (A.B.) 



Gray, Vernon Lincoln 
Hannan, Martin Leo 
Harker, Philip Marion 
Huntsberger, Raymond Winfield 
Kersten, Hugo Marie 
Martin, Samuel Babbitt 
*Meade, Frank John 
Nider, Gerald Knowlton 
Otto, Frank Wesley, Jr. 
Thurber, Floyd Frederick 
Widman, Norman 
Witherbee, Harold Rhody 



SOPHOMORES 



Bertie, William James (B.S.) 
Browne, Francis E. (B.S.) 
Burson, William Worth 
Garrison, Olin Herndon 



Bailey, Charles Albert 
Beckett, Wilbur Archer 
Berman, Phoebus 
Bowers, William Sidney 
Chapman, James Lowell 
Coleman, Frank Daniel, (Ph.G.) 
Conaty, Joseph Aloysius, Jr. 
Craig, Stephen A. (A.B.) 
Damron, Milton Herbert 
Farrel, Joseph Webster 
Fossler, Miss Mabel (A.B.) 
Friend, Robert Sherman 
Godshall, Leon Deane 
He-zikopf, Sam Sidney 
Hohanshelt, Miss Anna S. (A.B.) 
Jenkins, Rayel B. (A.B.) 



Hammons, Miss Mabel (A.B.) 
Hanson, Samuel 
Kalfus, Joseph Leland 
Lopizich, Ivo John 



JUNIORS 



Johnson, Elmer H. (B.S.) 

Kaplan, Max 

Kintzi, Erwin Julius 

Leonard, A. T., Jr. (A.B., B.S.) 

Otto, Miss Lucie Ernestine 

Saunders, Cecil Allen 

Smith, Gerald Fredoline 

Spencer, Reuel Madison 

Stark, Leander William 

Steele, Mark Twain 

Sutton, Irwin Coleman 

Van Liere, Edward Jerald (A.B. M.S.) 

Viole, Pierre Paul 

Weltman, Carl George (A.B.) 

Wescott, Virgil 

Zeiler, Joe 



SENIORS 



Baron, Peter Paul 
Biorkman, Claes Gustav Anton 
Chapin, Charles Cox (B.L.) 
Cochran, Richard Cocks 
Dickson, George Gillespie 
Felsenthal, Louis (DD.S.) 
Gallant, Peter Adolph 
Germon, Pierre Joseph 
Grant, Garnet Berke (B.S.) 



Hill, Jack Charles 

Kessler, Ernest Edwin (A.B.) 

Larson, Edwin 

McCoy, Earl Tucker 

Murphy, William Roe (B.S.) 

McNealy, Mrs. Frances Evelyn McLean 

Renfrew, John Beatty 

Rinehart, Martha Evelyn Dott (A.B.) 

Ryan, Clark David 



* Entered upon medical course at the beginning of the Second- Semester. 



338 



University of Southern California 



Schwartz, Edward Isador 
Schlanker, John Edwin 
Swantek, Casemyra Constance 
Swartz, Rex Forest 
Takahashi, Teiji 



Talbott, William Thompson 
Thompson, Harry Douglas 
Tice, Eldon Webb (A.B.) 
Waters, Zura Orthello 
Whitlow, Leslie Willis 



Adams, Mrs. Etta Kegler 
Boardman, Miss Marguerite 
Campbell, Roy S. 
Coffin, Miss L. 
Colcord, Ralph Mudge 
Divall, Miss Leslie I. 
Fink, Miss Kathryn Ward 
Flanagan, Miss Neulah D. 
Kitchen, Miss Revel Kathleen 



SPECIAL 



Livermore, Edward Eugene 

Maughan, Miss Mildred Fames 

Medin, Miss Albertine 

Safford, Miss Madeline 

Scott, John George 

Simpson, Miss Erna R. 

Thorley, Robert Aldridge (DD.b.) 

Walters, Ella Maude 

Vaudoit, Paul Louis 



POST-GRAIUJATE 



Fiske, William Clarence (M.D.) 
Spring, William A. (M.D.) 



Williamson, Lydia Stewart (M.D.) 
Woods, Arthur Albert (M.D.) 



Catalogue of Students 



339 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

First Year 



Aberle, Frederick C. 
Adair, Joseph Albert 
Andrus, Edson Allan 
Arblaster, George Jeremiah 
Avery, Chester LeRoy 
Bacheller, Robert Dale 
Baltimore, George 
Barrett, Jessie 
Beale, John Paul 
Beard, Cyrus Sylvester 
Beatty, Stewart Burrows 
Biby, Harry Caswell 
Bowen, Frederick Wallace 
Bradt, Garrett 
Brisacher, Leo 
Burer, Rachel Elise 
Broker, Russell Marcus 
Bruce, George Orange 
Bruce, Henry Webster 
Bruce, Robert Wallace 
Cameron, Brewster, Jr. 
Campbell, Charles George 
Carnes, Grover Cloe 
Carvel, Mae 
Casler, Nathaniel Ben 
Chase, Harry William 
Church, Raymond Frank 
Cleary, William Francis 
Courtier, Janie Stubbs 
Crescy, Jane L. 
Curtin, Francis Thomas 
Dahn, Frank Robert 
Devin, Joseph McDonald 
Dobyns, Caroll Merwin 
Dougherty, Isabel Luizia 
Enter, Ray Henry 
Field, William Joseph 
Ford, Stanley Livingston 
Ford, William Howland 
Fulton, Estella 
Gahan, K. W. 
Gallagher, Joe James 
Garratt, Edward Douglas 
Goodman, Charles Leo 
Gould, Roscoe 
Guyot, Stanley Casper 
Haight, Raymond Leroy 
Hartman, Ernest Kurt 
Hoblitt, Dorothy Marian 
Horowitz, Harry 



Howeth, Irving Keller 
Hurlbut, Harry Stuart 

Huse, Edwin Ernest 

Ignatius, Hovsep Bohos 

Jannie, Dewey 

Johnson, Amelia Fiedler 

Johnson, Lillian 

Jones, Henry Otis 

Jones, Thomas Brodie 

Janrowsky, Frances E. 

Keeney, Ashby H. 

Keithly, Harry Albert 

Kerlin, James Ridelle 

Ketchum, Henry Barstow 

Kidd, Marguerite Wilcox 

King, James L. 

Kloess, Roland A. 

Koch, Henry George 

LeBlanc, Florence 

Lickel, Jessie Maud 

Lindeman, Harold Henry 

Long, Frank Raymond 

Macaraig, Serafin Egmidio 

Malloy, Alex 

Mann, Malvin Harold 

Mathews, Lee D. 

Martyn, Lewis Clyde 

May, Cecil Edgar 

McCabe, Barkman C. 

McGrory, James Gillies 

McGwire, Charles Howard 

McKenzie, Truman Georte Hart 

Mehard, Maud S. 

Menzies, Thomas Porteous, Jr. 

Mesny, Dorothea 

Mier, Millard Moreland 

Mills, John Gordon 

Mitchell, Walter Kelley 

Miller, Robert Stuart 

Moomjian, Harry Setrack 

Morgan, Elder Rand 

Morris, Arnold Joseph 

Morris, Frank Charles 

Musselman, John Edward 

Nathan, Robert Florance, Jr. 

Neill, Hazel Louise 

Neill, Annie Lo 

Nichols, Ruth Anne 

Norman, O. A. 

Olson, Robert Marcellus 

Osborne, John Rothery 



340 



University of Southern California 



Parker, George A. 
Paterson, Gwendoline M. 
Phillips, Alta Faye 
Pilibos, Alexander Stephen 
Potter, William Dayton 
Powers, Llewellyn Jacob 
Randall, Helen M. 
Reed, George William S. 
Richards, David Wayne 
Robbins, Henry Clay 
Roberts, Carroll C. 
Roberts, Daisy 
Robinson, Isaac Burton 
Rosenthal, Lillian 
Sarkisian, Edward Arshag 
Sayers, Alfred Henry Paul 
Scott, DeWitt Clinton 
Sebille, Harolde Lemuel 
Simonds, Earl Elwyn 
Smith, Samuel Barnes 
Smith, Herbert Lent 
Smith, Russell 
Sokolow, Joseph 
Sparks, Richard Stuart 



Allen, Kent 

Ankrum, Morris Winslow 
Arnold, James Clinton 
Bachtell, Sidney Norriss 
Bailey, Elmer Ellsworth 
Baker, William Dale 
Bank, Louis Frederick 
Bamicle, Peter Joseph 
Barrett, James Taylor 
Bedford, Stephen 
Benjamin, Pascal Paul 
Bisher, John Lowell 
Briedenbach, Homer Louis 
Brockow, Anna 
Brunton, Arthur William 
Briney, Perry Glenn 
Burke, Frazee Franklin 
Cheever, Sumner Charles 
Coffman, Loyd Hamilton 
Coleman, Leslie Alfonso 
Colgan, William Lincoln 
Colver, Seth Ingraham 
Carroll, Emmett Arthur 
Clark, John Gee 
Cornell, Ross Earl 
Costello, Ruth Claire 
Davis, Leland Stanford 
De Costa, Douglas Richard 
Dellamore, William 
Darby, Larry Lee 



Sprague, Elisabeth Emma 
Squires, George Forbes 
Stagg, John Angus 
Studer, Bernard Ernest 
Sweet, Douglas C. 
Takemura, Ishiro 
Terrazos, Adela 
Vanderburg, Dorothy Cecil 
Van Waters, Miriam 
Voss, Louis Alfred 
Wallace, John Abram 
Wapner, Max Sam 
Washburn, James Harding 
Weller, Katherine 
Welts, David 
Whaley, Guy Vernellen 
White, Helen Hardman 
Wickham, George Ramond 
Will, Arthur Joseph 
Wilkerson, Heiman Payne 
Wolf, Sam 
Woods, John 
Yost, Harold Edward 



Second Year 



DeVore, John Sweeny 
Durst, Walter Claude 
Ellis, Winifred 
Faust, Leo Jackson 
Felt, Harold Edward 
Ferry, Hubert C. 
Fisher, Eugene Irving 
Follen, Betty 
Frampton, Jesse Jones 
Friedman, Amos 
Fulton, John Minney 
Fursee, Jacob Morris . 
Givan, John Vernon 
Glover, George Andrew 
Gratz, James Max 
Grua, Clifford 

Henneberry, Edward Joseph 
Heron, Frank 
Hidey, Anna Maxwell 
Hodge, Raymond Washington 
Hoffman, Elmer Henry 
Holcomb, Samuel Frost 

Hollingswbrth, James Clay 

Homan, George W. 

Hookstratten, St. Cyr Eddie 

Horowitz, Samuel 

Hubbard, Alva Traver 

Hughes, Ray Albert 

Javier, Emilio Cruz 

Joffee, Isaac 



Catalogue of Students 



341 



Kaiser, Roy C. 
Ketcherside, Hugh V. 
Kidder, Ralph Greely 
Kincaid, Clarence Leslie 
Knight, Katherine Valentine 
Kuyumjian, Khoren 
Lacey, Gladys May 
Leonard, Allan 
Lloyd, Norman Angus 
Machin, Charles Spencer 
Mahan, Henry W., Jr. 
Manion, Francis Le Roy 
Marble, John McKinley 
Marcher, Ralph Hiram 
Martin, Carl Phillips 
McAleer, James Clarence 
McBride, James Ackley 
McCartney, Florence 

McCreery, Maurice Elliott 

McKinnon, Morton Howard 

Messinger, Lawrence Irving 

Miyisaki, Shoji 

Morton, Dorothy Smith 

Murray, Frank Forest 

Myers, Gerald Willis 

Nathanson, Abraham Benjamin 

Oakley, Clemmence Rebecca 

Paguio, Pedro 

Perkins, Voltaire 

Pfeiffer, William Townsend 

Phillips, Ralph Aubrey 

Pike, Bennett 

Porter, Jesse Bach 



Power, Clark Homer 
Prudhon, Harold Edward 
Redwine, Donald Macnale 
Remollo, Pacifico Rendon 
Rittenhouse, Charles Joseph 
Ronan, Hanorah Kathryn 
Saroyan, Aram Minas 
Smith, Clyde Watson 
Smith, Ridley Clark 
Smuckler, Elijah Mitchell 
Sparling, Maurice C. 
Spiess, Louis Charles 
Stack, Wickliffe 
Stannard, Leland Van * 
Stark, Eldon William 
Stevens, Leslie Arthur 
Stoddard, Frank Wilcox 
Struve, Heinrich Wilhelm 
Swanner, John Lynn 
'Thomas, William Perry 
Thompson, John Harry 
Truman, Ida Evelyn 
Trythall, Tom Cree 
Van Vranken, Alfred Dayton 
Vaughan, Dale German 
Vilas, Ralph A. 
Wallace, Charles Daniel 
Webb, Arthur C. 
Webber, Joseph Benjamin 
Woehr, Ida B. 
Younkin, Paul Elbert 
Zumbrunnen, Bartley 



Third Year 



Ahlborn, John Frederick 

Alber, Arthur 

Alexander, Maurice Alvin 

Alimisis, Liberius Eusthathius 

Alter, Richard 

Ambrose, Thomas Lyford 

Ames, Edwin Neal 

Baltimore, Irving 

Bank, Elliot Mantell 

Banta, Earl Lott 

Beach, Earl C. 

Becker, Ernest August 

Bayley, Edgar A. 

Beirne, William Byran 

Betz, Cecil Pearl 

Balkeslee, Ralph Kennedy 

Bock, Mae C. 

Boynton, Harold Law 

Brinck, Grace Bertha 

Bulfinch, Mildred Gray 

Burke, John Harley 



Burns, Phil 
Camp, Edwin Lee 
Campbell, James Watson 
Chelgrene, Marie 
Cla3'ton, Clarence Edgar 
Clock, John G. 
Cohen, Alex 
Copland, Mab 
Costello, James Patrick 
Crenshaw, Margaret McCargar 
Denney, Charles Elmer 
Doran, Mollie Louise 
Dorr, Donald G. 
Drain, Lulu M. 
Eaton, Allen March 
Eberhard, Claire Vivian 
Ellis, J. Pratt 
Ellison, Harry B. 
Fenimore, George W. 
Fitzpatrick, Richard 
Freund, Leo 



342 



University of Southern California 



Gibson, Huron Young 
Gilligan, John Andrew 
Glickman, David 
Glueck, Nathan H. 
Gore, lacob Charles 
Haun," Raymond Valentine 
Haun, Fred Adoff 
Herrick, George Ira 
Hertel, Elmer Joseph 
Higgins, Harvey Gawen 
Home, John Douglas 
Humphries, Louis Kyle 
Hunter, Keith Carlton 
lvins, Otto Hughes 
Jacobs, Otto Arthur 
Jones, Lloyd Francis 
Kaufman, Louis 
Kaufman, Sylvanus B. 
Keiser, Loyd E. 
Kendall, Newton Jerome 
Kendrick, Victor Hargrave 
Kennicott, Kenneth Boyden 
Kiggens, Harold Stanford 
Koenig, Victor Hubert 
Larson, Walter Alexander 
Leitch, Constance 
Lester, Will I. 
Lewis, Max 

Linneman, Hisko Meyer 
Lopez, Ross 
Love, Esther Irene 
Lukens, Charles Edward, J 
MacMillan, Clifford James 
Maguire, Patrick John 
Malette, Frank 
Marsh, Llewellyn Fay 
Modesti, Phinoclade 
Mcintosh, Frazier 
Meyer, Sylas Slocum 
Mitchell, Allen George 
Nelson, Flora Belle 
Nix, George William 
Nix, Lloyd Stephens 
Olson, Emil A. 
Orfila, Ernest Roland 



Owens, Timon Evans 
Peipers, Paul 
Pelzer, Isidor Archie 
Phister, Jay Montgomery 
Platz, Hugh 
Pope, James Harlan 
Rifkind, Joseph J. 
Robbins, Joe H. 
Rodden, Edward Jerome 
Ross, George Byron 
Ross, James Madison 
Sadicoff, Harry Gregory 
Salumbides, Vincente 
Schafer, Henry, Jr. 
Scharnikow, Charles Henry 
Schmitz, Earl Donald 
Schmidt, Justus John 
Semon, Louis 
Shaw, Henry W. 
Sheldon, Caryl Mason 
Sindorf, Ralph Theodore 
Smith, Fred 

Smith, Mary Stanwood 
Southwick, Harold Irving 
Stagg, Ira James 
Stevens, Fayette Carson 
Stevenson, F. Josephine 
Stroud, Roy Clarence 
Sturzenacker, Carl Burnley 
Subith, Fred E. 
Teel, Courtney Augustus 
Thiele, William Gustave 
Thompson, Renwick 
Thompson, Sewell William 
Thorne, Lester Cornelius 
Tupman, Will Homer 
Tyree, Darwin Garrett 
Veale, Anita Wilson 
Ward, Clarence Clifford 
Waters, Frank Joseph 
Wilson, Richard 
Williamson, William Roy 
Woodhead, Florence Miriam 
Zacher, Edwin Frederick 



SUMMER SCHOOL— 1917 



Ahlborn, John Frederick 
Alber, Arthur 
Allen, Kent 

Bachtell, Sidney Norriss 
Baker, William Dale v 
Barnicle, Peter Joseph 
Beach, Earl C. 
Bayley, Edgar A. 
Beirne, William Byran 



Bisher, John Lowell 
Bock, Mae C. 
Bravender, Eugene Allin 
Brunton, Arthur William 
Burer, Rachel Elise 
Camp, Edwin Lee 
Campbell, James Watson 
Carnes, Grover Cloe> 
Campbell, Charles George 



Catalogue of Students 



343 



Clark, John Gee 
Clayton, Clarence Edgar 
Cleary, William Francis 
Conway, Paul F. A. 
Copland, Mab 
Coleman, Leslie Alfonso 
Cornell, Ross Earl 
Crenshaw, Margaret 
Costello, James Patrick 
Dahn, Frank Robert 
Davenport, Allen George 
DeCosta, Douglas Richard 
Denney, Charles Elmer 
DeReyes, Alber 
Dibbern, Owen Stanley 
Doran, Mollie Louise 
Dorr, Donald G. 
Drajn, Lulu M. 
Ellison, Harry B. 
Felt, Harold Edward 
Fenimore, George W. 

Follen, Betty 

Forbes, William Boomer 

Fulton, Estella 

Gibson, Huron Young 

Gilligan, John Andrew 

Givan, John Vernon 

Glickman, David 

Glover, George Andrew 

Glueck, Nathan H. 

Gore, Jacob Charles 

Herrick, George Ira 

Hiemenz, Bernard 

Hidey, Anna Maxwell 

Hagerty, Robert Byron 

Homan, George W. 

Humphries, Louis Kyle 

Hurlburt, Harry Stuart 

Ivins, Otto Hughes 

Jenkins, L. 

Jones, llenry Otis 

Kahan, Harry 

Keaney, A. H. 

Kendall, Newton Jerome 

Ketcherside, Hugh V. 

Kiggens, Harold Stanford 

Knight, Katherine Valentine 

LaPrade, A. T. 

LeBlanc, Florence 



Leitch, Constance 

Lester, Will I. 

Lukens, Charles Edward, Jr. 

MacGinnis, F. G. 

Maguire, Patrick John 

Marcher, Ralph 

Manion, Francis LeRoy 

Modesti, Phinoclade 

Morton, Dorothy Smith 

McCartney, Florence 

Nathan, Robert Florance, Jr. 

Norman, O. A. 

Olson, Emil A. 

Peckham, Everett Robin 

Perkins, Voltaire 

Pike, Bennette 

Platz, Hugo 

Power, C. H. 

Remollo, Pacifico R. 

Rilliet, Charles Eugene 

Ring, William Charles, Jr. 

Rodden, Edward Jerome 

Ross, George Byron 

Ross, James Madison 

Schaefer, Henry 

Shaw, Henry W. 

Sheldon, Caryl Mason 

Smith, Clyde Watson 

Stack, Wickliffe 

Stevenson, Josephine 

Struve, Heinrich Wilhelm 

Stanton, Adrian C. 

Stevens, F. C. 

Subith, Fred E. 
Teel, Courtney Augustus 
Thompson, Renwick 
Thorne, Lester Cornelius 
Tomlinson, Herbert Morgan 
Tupman, Will Hamer 
Vaughan, Dale G. 
Vilas, Ralph A. 
Ware, William Erham 
Waters, Frank Joseph 
Werner, Edwin Peter 
Whaley, Guy Vernellen 
White, Helen Hardman 
Williamson, William Roy 
Wood, Harold Mitchell 
Zumbrunnen, Bartley 



344 



University of Southern California 



Adams, C. W. 
Alexander, A. M. 
Baker, H. P. 
Balyeat, F. S. 
Baumgardt, H. O. 
Brownell, H. W. 
Chin, Seoug. 
Chin, S. T. S. 
Edmunds, W. B. 
Ferrie, Jas. W. 
Gilliam, J. T. 
Gray, G. W. 
Green, K. A. 
Green, T. A. J. 
Hastings, E. R. 
Hill, R. L. 
Jennings, O. D. 



COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 
FRESHMAN CLASS 1918 

King, R. 
Knight, Jno. G. 
Lowentrout, B. W. 
McClain, Rob't. W. 
McCann, M. 
Neen, W. A. 
Okrand, C. S. 
Oldham, Floyd 
Ridgeway, V. W. 
Sakamoto, S. 
Schmitz, W. R. 

Sherred, R. W. 

Smith, F. G. 

Smith, J. G. 

Smith, J. W. 

Steenberg, J. C. 

Stone, R. W. 



JUNIOR CLASS 1918 



Allan, Frederick 
Barnewolt, H. F. 
Barr, M. F. 
Barton, R. E. 
Bartzen, E. V. (Miss) 
Berkowitz, E. J. 
Bobbin, C. M. 
Boehm, Adolph 
Brown, O. L. 
Brown, W. W. 
Burton, C. N. 
Capps, H. E. 
Craig, W. H. 
Carlisle, F. B. 
Chiles, Geo. H. 
Crandall, G. E. 
Colgan, F. W. 
Dixon, C. P. 
Dougherty, J. H. 
Dunn, R« G. 
Durand, J., Jr. 
Elliott, H. D. 
Ellsperman, H. C. 
Finley, Jas. B. 
Fleishman, G. W. 
Fletcher, J. W. 
Frasher, L. A. 
Freer, T. P. 
Fried, E. R. 
Gibson, J. F. 
Gilbert, E. A. 



Glick, H. S. 
Goodson, B. J. 
Graham, E. E. 
Gregory, R. G. 
Hansen, J. T. 
Harden, D. F. 
Hardy, Phillips 
Harrison, Wm. W. 
Hawks, C. B. 
Hedrick, W. K. 
Heidner, V. L. 
Heron, D. F. 
Hogeboom, F. E. 
Holland, F. M. 
Horn, D. L. 
Howard, R. L. 
Hyatt, G. D. 
Jacobs, D. E. 
Juenger, D. E. 
Kotera, K. 
Kroeck, F. L. 
Krikos, Alex. 
Le Sieur, H. A. 
Lipking, C. E. 
Lucy, E. J. 
Lorenz, M. F. 
Martin, A. R. 
Mayer, C. H.- 
Medlin, F. H. 
Meredith, J. T. 
Merrill, K. W. 



Catalogue of Students 



345 



Moody, J. C. 
Morgan, Leon 
McClara, F. A. 
McNaughton, D. A. 
Newcomer, J. R. 
Neves, R. deC. 
Nordeen, O. J. 
Olds, K. C. 
Olincy, Alex. 
Parker, W. G. 
Peety, E. A. 
Phelps, G. A. 
Philp, W. B. 
Poppas, A. T. 
Pung, P. K. 
Reynolds, F. T. 
Roden, O. A. 
Rogers, R. M. 
Sams, M. J. 



Adair, H. S. 

Alvarez, H. H. 

Arnot, Melville 

Ballinger, Sanford 

Barnett, K. G. 

Barnhart, H. M. 

Baughman, L. M. 

Beebe, C. M. 

Berryhill, G. D. 

Blake, T. D. 

Bleak, Samuel 

Blythe, V. M. 

Brandriff, G. K. 
Brocxvett, D. E. 
Brown, G. E. 
Brown, H. T. Q. 
Buehren, W. J. C. 
Carson, J. W. 
Cobb, A. A. 
Disraeli, Israel 
Dobson, O. C. 
Duey, H. P. 
Ehrenclou, E. R. 
Fallgren, P. A. 
Faulkner, H. R. 
Ford, H. A. 
Garcia, G. F. 
Garvin, B. A. 
Gea, Wm. J. 
Gibbs, H. E. 
Gonzalez, A. A. 
Haycraft, M. S. 
Haughawout, L. C. 
Hill, H. J. 
Holubek, P. E. 



Schildwachter, Elsie 
Sellwood, R. H. 
Smith, Maurice 
Smith, W. R. 
Stanley, Jas. W. 
Strong, R. B. 
Tanner, D. B. (Miss) 
Taylor, L. J. 
Tennis, P. C. 
Titensor, F. E. 
Thompson, E. C. 
Thompson, E. W. 
Tsukifugi, F. M. 
Van Buskirk, G. 
Vint, R. B. 
Walton, W. A. 
Werner, J. 
Wilkes, F. L. 
Wilkinson, F. R. 

SENIOR CLASS 1918 

Hook, A. J . 
Ironmonger, J. L. 
Jones, C. W. 
Kane, T. F. 
Krause, F. W. 
Levitin, A. W. 
Lichtenwalter, R. B. 
Liddle, F. W. 
Lorenz, W. H. 
Menges, J. B. 
Miller, K. J. 
Mitchell, H. L. 
Muidock, L.-H. 
McElvaine, H. H. 
McElwee, J. W. 
McMillan, R. D. 
Nicholson, N. N. 
Packard, E. S. 
Perner, L. H. 
Pierce, C. R. 
Planck, M. G. 
Ramage, G. R. 
Richardson, J. ]VI. 
Roberts, R. R. 
Saito, D. 
Sanders, A. E. 
Scholz, E. E. 
Shay, W. W. 
Smith, A. A. 
Smith, D. R. 
Smith, V. J. 
Somerville, V. J. 
Stevenson, R. B. 
Stibolt,J. P. 
Sweningsen, S. W. 



346 



University of Southern California 



Thee, E. J. 
Thompson, M. J. 
Tistaert, G. A. 
Trumpower, H. H. 
Vanasen, D. W. 
Vieille, A. C. 
Vogt, G. O. 
Volin, L. W. 



Warren, R. A. 
Waters, J. E. 
Wells, A. H. 
White, G. W. E. 
Whitesell, D. W. 
Woudries, H. W. 
Woodward, C. M. 



Catalogue of Students 



347 



COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY 



Alexander, G. W. 
Bolton, A. H. 
Butters, A. D. 
Chaffee, Ralph 
Clarey, H. D. 
Engle, John H., A.B. 
Haberman, Sam 
Hedley, Percy 
Himrod, Minnie 
Johnson, B. C, A.B. 
Kline, Leo C. 
Knight, C. L. 
Knott, J. P. 
Knickrehm, Fred 



Lamport, Warren D. 
Malan, W. E., A.B. 
Murakami, Peter T. 
Mclntire, W. C. 
Nelson, M. G. 
Newman, F. R. 
Nease, Floyd 
Oda, K. 
Robinson, E. J. 
Reynolds, L. G. 
Simmons, H. O. 
Traveller, Gilbert 
Wellman, C. R. 



348 



University) of Southern California 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 



Baltzer, Henry Raymond 
Barber, Kenneth Scott 
Barnes, Alfred Osgood 
Beal, Howard Francis 
Bernard, R. Warren 
Cerveny, Leone Lenore 
Clark, F. Ben 
Dittmer, Adolf L. 
Evans, Roy M. 
Hawley, Wilbur Phillips 
Jackson, Kenneth Dundas 
Kessler, Bella 
Montgomery, Brooks 
Moyer, Ernest Leroy 
Nobe, Shigeaki 
Ohtoma, Namio 



Awe, Emma Louise 
Bower, Carlyle 
Czerniawsky, E. 
Delany, Oliver W. 
Diebold, Clarence Andrew 
Doe, John 

Doyle, Francis Irving 
Ewins, Edith Mary 
Fairchild; Leslie C. 
Gunter, Raymond R. 
Hill, Stanley Reed 
Islieb, Raymond Morris 
Kine, Frank 

Lawrence, H. Grosvenor 
Lee, W. Ray 



Junior 



Olman, Alice 
Penard, Noel Lawrence 
Prince, Leslie Lawrence 
Reno, Charles E. 
Sacks, Aaron 
Sakae, Hideo 
Sedwick, Ruth Gertrude 
Smith, Mrs. Letha Crane 
Spear, Edgar Berthold 
Tilton, Arthur Lawrence 
Toshigi, Yoshino George 
Webster, Harold Franklin 
Wing, Lew S. 
Wiseman, Adolph 
Wolff, Waldo Arnold 



Senior 



Lippman, Nathan 
Maas, Harold Carl 
Marshall, Charles E. 
Matthews, Wickliffe, Jr. 
Mazy, Leon Louis 
Putnam, Silas Ross 

Quertermous, S. W. 
Raw, Harold M. 

Reade, Harold Leslie 

Robbins, Robert 

Sarrail, Albert J. 

Spear, Irwin Edward 

Stone, Harry Emil 

Veiner, Charles E. 



Catalogue of Students 



349 



COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

Students for Year 1917-18 



Adams, Blanche 

Adams, Ruth 

Adler, Irene 

Alderson, Harriett 

Anderson, Stanley 

Anderson, Travis 

Ardis, Haygood 

Arkley, Hilda 

Armbrust, Norma 

Arnold, Archie 

Atwater, Margaret 

Ayers, Mrs. Lilian 

Babcock, Mrs. H. E. 

Baker, Floyd 

Ball, Alice 

Ball, Louis 

Barlow, Genevieve 

Barnes, Lucile 

Barron, Mary 

Bennett, Mrs. Mary 

Benson, Gunhilde 

Betz, Mamie 

Bevillard, Lois 

Beyl, Vera 

Billingsley, Hester 

Black, Stephen 

Boettger, Alma 

Borgerding, Martha 

Bowen, Louise 

Boyd, Edna 
Brewer, Louise 

Briggs, Howard 
Brillhart, Grayce 
Brite, Ruby 
Broyles, Angie Lee 
Bruce, Grace 
Burstrom, Leda 
Butler, Mattie 
Calloway, Virginia 
Canet, Renie 
Campbell, Marion 
Carden, Marie 
Carey, P. D. 
Carner, Catherine 
Carner, Cuba 
Carson, Marie 
Cartwright, Catherine 
Caruthers, Ed. 
Caruthers, Emel 
Casler, Emmy Lou 
Champion, Lucile 



Champlain, Gertrude 

Cleveland, Hazel 

Cline, Gladys 

Cobb, Lois 

Combe, Irene 

Cook, Josephine 

Couch, Lina 

Coxon, Mrs. Margaret White 

Coykendall, Florence 

Craig, Lois 

Crain, Ernestine 

Crowther, Rhea 

Cruickshank, Barnella 

Daniels, Charlotte 

Davis, Charlotte 

Davis, Robert 

Deming, Virginia 

De Muth, Helen 
deRackin, Margaret 
Deuel, Starr 
Dick, Margaret 
Dolly, Marion 
Donnerstag, Mrs. 
Dow, E. G. 
Dresser, Catherine 
Dyer, Frances 
Dyer, Laura 
Dunham, Helen 
Edminston, Ruth 
Elliott, Mrs. Florence 
Emmett, Floyd 
Falkenstein, Stanley 
Fay, Pearle 
Feeler, Mrs. Mabel 
Ferguson, John 
Ferguson, Mrs. Eleanor 
Ferrahian, Mrs. Eunice 
Fitz, Hollis 
Fitz, John Allen 
Fitz, Ruth 
Fridlund, Ruth 
Friend, A. 
Friend, Estella 
Fritch, Helen 
Frueh, Felix 
Fullam, Frances 
Fullam, Helen 
Garrison, Dorothy 
Gates, Eugene 
Green, Cilbert 
Hager, Theodora 



350 



University of Southern California 



Halcomb, Ysobel 
Hammond, Ida Mat 
Harpster, Lyman 
Harris, Jessica 
Hartzell, Doris 
Hauber, Marguerite 
Hawkins, J. P. 
Hayes, Lila 
Henry, Geraldine 
Henry, Mildred 
Hicks, Eloise 
Higgins, Mrs. M. H. 
Hilend, Martha 
Hissong, Tillie 
Hoist, J. R. 
Hopkins, Annie 
Howell, Julia 
Howell, Mr. C. L. 
Howe??, Mrs. C. L. 
Huse, Lois 
Jackson, Sydney 
Jamgochian, Elisa 
Jensen, Edith 
Jessurum, Jeannette 
Jessurum, Johanna 
Jewell, Mrs. Olive 
Jewett, Howard 
Johnson, Miss 
Johnston, Agnes 
Johnston, Lillis 
Josten, Beatrice 
Kaiser, Bernice 
Kann, Beatrice 
Kenah, Mrs. O. A. 
Kennedy, Mrs. L. 
Kern, Faye 
Kern, Mrs. F. B. 
Kirker, Margaret 
Kiss, G. J. Jr. 
Kraatel, Otto 
Laning, Emma 
Larson, Ruth 
Lawrence, Alia Mae 
Lemke, Leonard 
Lennox, Catherine 
Leonhardt, Miss 
Leslie, Mildred 
Levings, Doris 
Lewis, Mabel 
Lietzau, Emily 
Listman, May^ 
Litterer, Bessie 
Livingston, Miss 
Llewellyn, Mrs. Gladys 
Longworth, Eleanor 
Longworth, Frederick 
Lovell, Alta 



Lyon, Gretchen 
Mang, Mrs. Fred 
Manley, Melba 
Manter, Ida 
Mattis, Sarah 
Meckes, Marcella 
Meier, Helen 
Meier, Mildred 
Miller, Mary Jane 
Mizener, Dacotah 
Monfort, Josephine 
Morres, N. K. 
McElheney, Alice 
McElheney, John 
McGee, Mrs. Alice 
McKee, Margaret 
McKinney, Iris 
Neil, Florence 
Nelson, Ruth 
Nickey, Jeanette 
Nordoff, Mary 
Ogilvie, Mrs. 
Osterhout, Josephine 
Pape, Daisy 
Pape, Myrtle 
Peck, Marjorie 
Pendleton,' Gladys 
Perry, Virginia 
Petermann, Vivian 
Phelps, Mrs. W. W. 
Phillippi, Loverne 
Phillips, Bruce 
Pickrell, Betty June 
Pierce, Laura 
Pomeroy, Leona 
Putman, C. H. 
Redinger, Ray 
Reeks, Gladys 
Rees, Lois 
Rimpaux, Sophia 
Ritchie, Mrs. J. H. 
Roberts, Theodore 
Roesch, Doris 
Ronkin-Rooser, Miriam 
Rosenkranz, M. Frances 
Ross, Mrs. Gertrude 
Rueh, Virgil 
Ruether, Mrs. J. 
Sackett, Frank 
Sackett, Sallie 
Sammons, Mrs. Georgia 
Sasina, E. 
Schoeller, Marjorie 
Schutz, Laura 
Schwab, Harold 
Scribner, Mrs. Luella 
Sesma, Frank 



Catalogue of Students 



351 



Shaw, Mrs. N. L. 
Shankland, Edith 
Shankland, John 
Shankland, Miss S. E. S. 
Shankland, Sidney 
Sheldon, Blanche 
Shelton, Belle 
Shiner, Gerald 
Simpson, Mrs. G. M. 
Slater, Collise 
Slaughter, Clarinda 
Smith, Edna 
Smith, Lucy 
Snidow, Florence 
Speicher, Elizabeth 
Spera, Mrs. E. D. 
Stanley, C. E. 
Steele, Mrs. E. W. 
Steward, Katherine 
Steward, Wendell 
Stewart, Mabel 
Stock, Oswald 
$tone, Marie 
Stone, Nina 
Storey, Mrs. Frank 
Stratton, Rosemary 
Streech, Mrs. E. 
Suess, Ruth 
Tanaka, Shio 
Taylor, G. H. 
Teeple, Mrs. Frank 
Thacher, Paul 
Timmons, Flora 
Toensing, Frances 



Thompson, Lida 
Thomas, Edith 
Travers, L. D. 
Utter, Billy 
Utter, Marion 
Vermilyea, Stanley 
Vores, Gladys 
Wagner, Lillian 
Wagner, Rose 
Waggoner, Mrs. E. L. 
Wahl, Elizabeth 
Waite, Mrs. R. 
Waldie, Mrs. Lillian 
Walker, Lila M. 
Walker, Mrs. N. B. 
Wallace, Alberta 
Wallace, Marion 
Walls, John 
Waltz, Mrs. L. 
Warren, E. 
Waterman, Beulah 
Wetter, Miss 
Weipert, Bessie 
Wellman, Luna 
Wells, Lola 
Wendt, Emma 
Whitacre, Lulu 
White, Dorothy 
Whitehead, Walburga 
Whiteman, Marion 
Willmart, Ellen 
Wirtz, Elizabeth 
Woodforde, Florence 
, Wyatt, Emma 



352 



University of Southern California 



COLLEGE OF ORATORY 



CLASS STUDENTS 



Anderson, Mrs. Margaret 
Albert, Roberta 
Amidon, Oak 
Alexander, Gross W. 
Agor, Bessie 
Armstrong, R. J. 
Brubaker, Harriet 
Barker, Harriet 
Bonebreak, Lucile 
Brite, Ruby 
Brady, Armond 
Beale, Paul J. 
Bainbridge, Helen 
Bose, Roy 

Bell, Mrs. Nellie K. 
Bainbridge, Carleton R. 
Bowen, F. W. 
Beebe, R. 
Brewster, Harold 
Button, Nettie 
Barre, Myrtle 
Bryant, Carolyn 
Converse, Nana 
Collins, Ernest 
Crandall, Marion 
Calkins, Lorna 
Cleaveland, Artie K. 
Clark, Lillian M. 
Croke, Annie 
Core, Helen 
Christiansen, Davida 
Cockrane, Elizabeth 
Collins, Gracebel 
Cooney, Marie 
Comstock, Marion 
Constant, Claribel 
Crowther, Rhea 
Cobb, Mrs. Mary 
Doyle, Annina 
Dwight, Reba 
Dennis, Marie 
Denton, Gladys 
Dole, Eva 
Davenport, Helen 
DeArmond, Z. A. 
Davis, Mildred 
Dougherty, Marjorie 
Dennis, Alice R. 
Ehrenclou, Sigrid 
Emery, Alton 
Eade, Lucile 



Estes, Helen 
Eisen, Eugene 
Funk, Velma 
Feltham, Dorothy 
. Fletcher, Helen 
Fuller, Ruth 
Fuller, Georgette 
Frazier, Alice 
Farlow, Gladys 
Goetz, Margaret 
Goodrich, Clarence 
Giffen, Marguerite 
Gould, Roscoe 
Gray, Peryle A. 
Gray, Mary A. 
Gillett, George F. 
Geary, Inez 
Guibersoh, Bernice 
Heath, Alpha 
Hargis, Helen 
Hinsdale, Ruth 
Henderson, Cliff 
Hirschfield, Ellis 
Hull, Ruth 
Hinsdale, Willian 
Hockenyos, Wilhelmina 
Hulette, Gertrude 
Hinsdale, Jennie Ruth 
Inman, Ruth 
Jordan, Ruby 
Jachson, Marie H. 
Joslin, Phoebe 
Kinder, Evelyn 
Kallawoda, Gladys 
Kauffmann, Mary Barbara 
Kalstead, Frances 
King, Oona 
Kern, Helen 
Lewis, Winnie 
Loomis, Mrs. Nina 
Lockhart, Hugh W. 
Lauderback, J. C. 
Leur, Al H. 
Lovejoy, Lena 
Lane, Edith 
Lewis, Edith N. 
Lampert, Gladys 
LeSage, Marguerite 
Luke, Marjorie 
Lustig, Deborah 
Mizener, Ruth 



Catalogue of Students 



353 



Mackie, Mildred 

Middaugh, Virginia 

Millar, Cheryl 

McKee, Margaret 

Meekins, Neola 

Marr, Esther 

Monfort, Jean 

Marriott, Gladys 

Miller, Eva 

Morton, Lydia 

Murray, Glenn 

Mayock, Aura 

Marshall, De Witt T. 

Matthews, Nettie 

McAlmon, R. M. 

Mail, Harriet 

McDonald, Anita 

Matlin, David 

McCrea ; Alta 

McQueen, Annie C. 

Xasatir, J. 

Xephine, Russel 

Nordahl, Henry A. 

Patten, Helen C. 

Petri, Mrs. Ethel 

Peirson, Olive 
Peterson, Mary Ellen 
Place, Helen 
Parrish, Ada 
Pope, Zemula 
Pinkham, Ruth V. 
Palmer, Greta A. 
Robinson, Mable 
Roberts, Loretta 
Raynor, Charlotte 
Rothe, Gertrude 
Rendler, John C. 
Roesch, Doris 
Rensberger, Ramona 
Strait, Lyla 



Sloan, Myrtle 

Schurr, Dorothy 

Smith, Emma 

Schelmick, Lydia 

Sharp, Edwin 

Spencer, Natalie 

Sentous, Zoe 

Shamel, Margaret 

Sprenger, Florence 

Stuart, Violet 

Scharf, K. J. 

Schull, Mrs. T. P. 

Spooner, Mrs. Mable W. 

Schleter, Katie A. 

Tenneson, Rosemary 

Thielcke, Rosalie 

Thompson, Edna 

Thompson, Allen 

Tannebaum, David 

Thomas, Abigail 

Towles, Lucile 

Vanderstempel, K. 
Van Duzen, Edith 

Van Grove, Terese 

Voorhees, Mildred 
Wood, Virginia 
Wallace, Tean 
Warner, Ellena 
Wilmert, Ellen 
Walker, Chas. Z. 
Watson, Minnie T. 
Wagner, Delia M. 
Wendling, Abbie R. 
Whitcomb, Elizabeth 
Willis, Nora 
Weiss, Myrtle B. 
Woodward, Leila 
Wiser, Edna 
Walfis, Francis J. 
Zisick, Celeste 



PRIVATE LESSON STUDENTS 



Armstrong, R. J. 
Alexander, G. W. 
Agor, Bessie 
Barre, Myrtle 
Brite, Ruby 
Crowther, Rhea 
Comstock, Marion 
Constant, Claribel 
Christiansen, Davida 
Cobb, Mrs. Mary 
Cobb, Lois 

Chapman, George Arthur 
Dwight, Reba 
Damrell. Mary 



Dennis, Marie 
Estes, Helen 
Eade, Lucile 
Edmunds, Douglas J. 
Frazier, Alice 
Funk, Velma 
Fuller, Georgette 
Giffen, Marguerite 
Guiberson, Bernice 
Geary, Inez 
Heath, Alpha 
Harvey, Bonita J. 
Hicks, Florence 
Inman, Ruth 



354 



University of Southern California 



Jackson, Marie H. 
Kallawoda, Gladys 
Kinder, Evelyn 
LeSage, Marguerite 
Luke, Marjorie 
Lustig, Deborah 
Mizener, Ruth 
Mackie, Mildred 
Middaugh, Virginia 
Murchey, Mrs. Hope 
Millar, Cheryl 
Marr, Esther B. 
Maguire, Lulu 
McKee, Margaret 
McKeever, Helen 
Patten, Helen C. 



Petri, Mrs. Ethel 
Roesch, Doris 
Roberts, Loretta 
Strait, Lyla 
Sloan, Myrtle 
Schurr, Dorothy 
Towles, Lucile 
Tenneson, Rosemary 
Teel, Gertrude 
Voorhees, Mildred 
Van Grove, Terese 
Woodhead, Charlene 
Wilson, Elizabeth 
Wiser, Edna A. 
Weatherhead, Arthur C. 



Catalogue of Students 



355 



COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 



Leaver, Marian 
Clark, Marie S. 
Hooker, Alta E. 
Tapia, Lastenia 
Adams, Ava A. 
Culter, Edith 
Carter, Frances 
McManus, Josephine 
Cavana, Mary 
Bandy, Mary 
Thurtell, Mary E. 
Graves, Marian 



Krick, Minnie 
Lambert, Stella 
Dooley, Leita H. 
Brayton, L. C. 
Gammon, Delia 
Chan, W. H. 
Ware, Henry A. 
Hardy, J. Richard 
Dando, Mrs. Susie M. 
Morgan, Gladys 
Gott, Mrs. Emma Bridges 



356 



University of Southern California 



UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 



Abajian, Samuel 
Adams, Lora A. 
Agee, Frederick J. 
Allen, Tru 

Andrews, Rushworth 
Andrus, Edson 
Armstrong, Pearl A. 
Ball, Frank D. 
Ball, Louis K. 
Benning, Margaret S. 
Berg, Helen L. 
Bird, Eunice • 

Bogan, Ralston 
Borden, Vivian 
Boyd, Hazel R. 
Brett, Eugene B. 
Bryant, Carolyn G. 
Bryant, Gardner W. 
Butterfield, Viola L. 
Cagle, Clarence M. 
Cagle, Wana Lee 
Carroll, Grace L. 
Carlson, Emily 
Carlstad, Helga M. 
Cloud, Marguerite 
Cooper, Ralph S. 
Cox, Robert L. 
Cooney, Elzetta Marie 
Cranon, I. 
Davis, Genevieve 
Davis, Julia 
Davis, Harold W. 
Davis, Ruth A. 
DeVilbiss, Cecil F. 
s Dickerson, Gertrude L. 
Dickerson, Loraine M. 
Dill, Hayward W. 
Doak, Helen P. 
Dodge, Charles A. 
Dougherty, Louis 
Douglas, Paul T. 
Dwight, Reba 
Dyer, Heyward Jesse 
Dyer, Muriel M. 
Ericson, Florence A. 
Flaxman, Joseph 
Friedman, Harry 
Gerry, Hazel E. 
Gaskins, Martha R. 
Godsmark, Ruth 
Graham, Edith M. 
Greeley, Charles 
Greeley, Paul 



Gillett, D. Craig 
Guiberson, Ellen B. 
Hammarlund, Elsie E. 
Hays, Leona H. 
Helm, Vida B. 
Helms, Jack 
Herington, Helen W. 
Hill, Florence 
Hiscock, Loydra 
Hunt, Clarence S. 
Hunt, Gale 
Inman, Ruth 
Jaquish, L. L. 
Jacoby, Mrs. Esther 
Jay, Helen M. 
Jenkins, Carl G. 
Kingston, Edith M. 
Kline, Gerald E. 
Klinge, Ray A. 
Knoles, Dorothy A. 
Knoles, Edith E. 
Knoles, Lorraine I. 
Knoles, P. Walline 
Krieglsteiner, Frieda 
Long, Marian 
Lopez, Abbie 
McDill, Mary E. 
McGee, John B. 
McNichols, M. Elizabeth 
Mendez, Leovejildo 
Menzies, Thomas Porteous 
Messer, Norris 
Millar, Stephen 
Miller, Daniel 
Mills, Marguerite 
Mixer, J. Eugene 
Mooney, Esther B. 
Moore, Richard 
Morley, Arthur E. 
Olson, Vivian F. 
Owen, Randall 
Peer, Laila M. 
Petitfils, Raymond 
Phillips, Milford C. 
Pride, Nettie J. 
Pyle, Thelmar 
Raphael, Robert 
Ravis, Harry A. 
Redinger, J. Frank 
Richards, Rose May 
Rios, Josephine 
Ristow, Antonette 
Ro, Chinkook 



Catalogue of Students 



357 



Roel, Raul 
Roger, Mrs. Adella 
Ross, Hazel D. 
Russell, Mary L. 
Rykoff, Isabelle 
Sawyer, Dorothy 
Schneidau, Ebba 
Schoetl, August 
Shade, Richard 
Slater, Collise 
Smith, Edgar L. 
Smith, Thelma I. 
Speicher, Elizabeth 
Sutch, Arlington 
Tanquary, Frances 
Thorne, Dorothy 
Tufts, John Q. 
Walls, Marjorie D. 



M. 



Ward, H. Kenneth 
Ware, Vivian A. 
Weathers, Clarence 
Webster, Bernice 
Weintz, Dorothy J. 
Weller, Katherine 
Wheeler, Stanley A. 
White, Mrs. Alma C. 
Whiteside, Norma F. 
Williams, Edward 
Wilson, Ernestine 
Wilson, Marjorie 
Winegart, John F. 
Woods, M. Frances 
Woodward, Lucile 
Yarnell, Bruce A. 
Young, Margaiet 



358 



University of Southern California 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 



College of Liberal Arts: 

170 

Seniors ■ 192 

J uniors " 274 

Sophomores • - 

Freshmen 

_ . , 287 

^ PCC ; al ! ••'" 308 

Graduates .™ 

890 
Summer 

College of Physicians and Surgeons: 

c . 28 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen - 

Specials 

Post-Graduates 

College of Law: 

70 
Third Year Class 

Second Year Class - ! 

First Year Class - 352 

118 
Summer - 

College of Dentistry: 

c . 85 

Semors 100 

Juniors ' 

Freshmen , 

College of Theology: 



2518 



114 



470 



219 
27 



Summary 359 

College of Pharmacy: 

Seniors 29 

Juniors 31 

60 



College of Music:.. 



Deduct for names counted twice.. 



284 



College of Oratory: 

Private Students 59 

Class Students igl 

240 

Fine Arts: 23 

High School: 141 

Grand Total 4Qg6 

659 



Net Total - 3437 

Summer Session Registration for 1917: 

Liberal Arts g™ 

Physicians and Surgeons 1 

Law Z 118 

Fine Arts iq 

Music ZZZ 150 

Oratory ^ 40 

1209 



INDEX 



Abdominal Surgery, 197, 198. 

Admission Requirements: 
Liberal Arts, 32 ; 
Graduate Dept., 46; 
Summer Session, 156; 
High School, 299; 
Medicine, 163 ; 
Law, 205; 
Dentistry, 231; 
Theology, 255 ; 
Pharmacy, 268; 
Oratory, 205 ; 
Music, 280; 
Fine Arts, 292. 

Advanced Standing : 
Liberal Arts, 34 ; 
Medicine, 167; 
Law, 206; 
Dentistry, 232; 
Pharmacy, 268; 
Fine Arts, 292. 

Agriculture : 52. 

Alumni Presidents : 14. 

Anatomy : 

Medicine, 175; 
Dentistry, 239, 241, 242; 
See also under Zoology. 

Architecture : 

Liberal Arts, 123 ; 
Fine Arts, 293. 

Art and Design : 54. 

Athletics: See "Physical Education. : 

Attendance, Regulations concerning: 
Liberal Arts, 43 ; 
Medicine, 168; 
Law, 209; 
Dentistry, 233 ; 
Pharmacy, 269 ; 
High School, 298. 



Bachelor, Degrees of: See under 
"Degrees." 

Bacteriology : 

Medicine, 184; 
Dentistry, 248; 
See also under Biology. 

Bible: See under Religious Edu- 
cation. 

Biology: Liberal Arts, 55, 57. 

Botany: Admission, 39; 
Liberal Arts, 59; 
Pharmacy, 270; 
High School, 307. 

Buildings and Equipment : 
Liberal Arts, 138-146; 
Medicine, 158-163; 
Law, 204; 
Dentistry, 223-228; 
Pharmacy, 267 ; 
Fine Arts, 291. 

Business Regulations : 

See under "Fees and Expenses." 

Calendar: 6. 

Catalogue of Students, 1917-18: 310. 

Ceramic Art : 238. 

Certificates : See under "Courses 
Leading to Degrees, Diplomas 
and Certificates," and "High 
School Teachers' Certificates." 

Chemical Engineering: 136. 

Chemistry: Admission, 38; 

Liberal Arts, 60 ; 

Medicine, 180; 

Dentistry, 244; 

Pharmacy, 271 ; 

High School, 308. 
Church History: 262. 
Civil Engineering: 129. 
Civil Government : Admission, 38. 



362 



University of Southern California 



Classification of Students: 42. 

Clinics: Medicine, 160. 
Dentistry, 246. 

Commercial Law: Admission, 36. 

Conference Board of Education: 14. 

Conditions: Liberal Arts, 43; 
Medicine, 168. 

Cost of Living: See under "Fees 
and Expenses." 

Course of Study in Medicine, Reg- 
ulations Governing: 168. 

Courses Leading to Degrees, Di- 
plomas, or Certificates: 
Liberal Arts, 40, 47, 49, 123, 
124, 133; 

Medicine, 170-171; 
Law, 207; 
Dentistry, 233 ; 
Theology, 255; 
Pharmacy, 269 ; 
Oratory, 289; 
Music, 281; 
Fine Arts, 293; 
High School, 300. 

Crown and Bridge Work: 237. 

Debating: 146, 217. 

Degrees : 

Bachelor of Arts, 40 ; 

Bachelor of Arts in connection 

with Doctor of Medicine, 41, 

170; 

Bachelor of Arts in connection 

with Juris Doctor, 41, 207; 

Bachelor of Divinity, 255 ; 

Bachelor of Fine Arts, 292; 

Bachelor of Laws, 207; 

Graduate in Pharmacy, 269 ; 

Bachelor of Science, 42 ; 

Doctor of Dental Surgery, 233 ; 

Doctor of Medicine, 170; 

Master of Arts, 47; 

Master of Arts in connection 

with Doctor of Medicine, 171; 

Master of Laws, 207 ; 

Juris Doctor, 207; 

Pharmaceutical Chemist, 269. 

Dentistry, College of: 221. 



Departments of Instruction : 
Liberal Arts, 52; 
Medicine, 175; 
Dentistry, 234; 
Theology, 257; 
Pharmacy, 269; 
Oratory, 286; 
Fine Arts, 292; 
High School, 299. 

Dermatology: 190. 

Dietetics: 181. 

Diplomas: See under "Courses lead- 
ing to Degrees, Diplomas and 
Certificates." 

Directory : 8. 

Discipline: Medicine, 168; 
Law, 209; 
Dentistry, 232; 
Pharmacy, 278. 

Doctor, Degrees of: See under 
"Degrees." 

Drawing: Admission, 39; 
Liberal Arts, 67; 
High School, 309; 
See also under "Art and De- 
sign," and "College of Fine 
Arts." 

Economics: 69; 
Admission, 39; 
High School, 309. 

Education: 71. 

Electrical Engineering: 132. 

Electro-Therapeutics: 190. 

Embryology: 179. 

El Rodeo: 149. 

Engineering, Courses in: 42, 123- 
136. 

Engineering Courses, Elective in 
Liberal Arts: 79. 

English Bible: See Religious Edu- 
cation. 

English Language and Literature: 
Admission, 35 ; 
Liberal Arts, 75; 
High School, 302. 



Index 



363 



English Final Examinations : 80. 

Equipment: See under "Buildings 
and Equipment." 

Evening Session, College of Law : 
212. 

Examinations : 

Admission, 34 ; 

Liberal Arts, 43 ; 

Medical Admission, 164; 

Medicine, 169; 

Law, 209; 

Dentistry, 234; 

Pharmacy, 268; 

See also under "Calendar" and 

"Special Examinations." 

Extraction and Anaesthetics : 250. 

Faculties, The: 16-30. 

Fees and Expenses : 
Liberal Arts, 149; 
Summer Session, 156; 
Medicine, 172; 
Law, 220; 

Dentistry, 250; • 

Theology, 266; 
Pharmacy, 277 ; 
Oratory, 290; 
Music, 284; 
Fine Arts, 295 ; 
High School, 301. 

Fine Arts, College of: 291. 

Fraternities: 149, 219 

French: 81; 

Admission, 37. 

General College, Requirements for 
A. B.: 40. 

Genito-Urinary Diseases: 195. 
Geography, Physical : Admission, 

39. 
Geology : 82. 
Geometry : 

Admission, 38; 

High School, 307. 
German : 83. 

Admisison, 37; 

High School, 304. 



Gifts to the University: 154. 

Graduate Council, The: 45, 46. 

Graduate Courses : 
Liberal Arts, 47 ; 
Law, 215; 
Pharmacy, 275. 

Graduate Department of Liberal 
Arts, The: 45. 

Graduation Requirements : See under 
"Degrees" and "Courses Leading 
to Degrees, D'plomas and Cer- 
tificates." 

Greek : 64 ; 

Admission, 37; 
Theology, 261; 
High School, 304. 

Gymnasium: 145. 

Gynecology: 199, 200. 

Hebrew Language and History: 261. 

High School: 297. 

High School Teacher's Certificates, 
The: 49. 

Histology: 175, 179. 

History : 85 ; 

Admission, 39 ; 
High School, 306. 

Homiletics: 262. 

Honors on Graduation : 45. 
See also under "Prizes." 

Hospital Facilities: Medicine, 160. 

Housing: 147. 

Hygiene: 185. 

Industrial History : Admission, 39. 

Intercollegiate Oratorical Contests 
and Debates: 146, 218. 

Italian: 89. 

Jewelry : 294. 

Journalism : 90. 

"Junior Standing" Defined: 41. 



364 



University of Southern California 



Laboratories : 

Physics and Electrical En- 
gineering, 139; 
Biology, 142 ; 
Marine Station, 143 ; 
Chemistry, 144; 
Geology, 144 ; 
Medicine, 159; 
Dentistry, 224. 

Latin : 66 ; 

Admission, 36 ; 
High School, 305. 

Laryngology, 196. 

Law, College of: 204. 

Liberal Arts, College of: 32. 



Library Facilities : 

Liberal Arts, 138; 
Medicine, 162 ; 
Law, 205. 

Life Insurance Examination: 192. 

Location, Environment, etc. : 
The University, 9; 
Medicine, 158; 
Law, 204? 
Dentistry, 223; 
Theology, 265; 
Music, 279; 
Fine Arts, 291. 

Marine Biological Station: 58, 143. 

Master of Arts, Degree of: 47. 
With M.D., 171. 

Materia Medica : 
Dentistry, 238; 
Pharmacy, 271. 

Mathematics : 93. 
Admission, 38 ; 
High School, 306. 

Matriculation: See "Admission." 

Medical Ethics and Economics: 192. 

Medical Jurisprudence: 191. 

Medical, College of: See under "Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, College of." 

Medicine: 186. 



Medicine, History of: 191. 

Medicine, Summary of Curriculum: 
176-177. 

Microscopy: 184, 185, 270. 

Mining Engineering: 136. 

Missions and Comparative Religion: 
See Religious Education. 

Missions, Foreign : 259. 

Mural Painting: 29S. 

Museum, The: 139. 

Music, College of: 279; 

Courses Accepted Toward De- 
grees of A.B., 95. 

Nervous and Mental Diseases: 189. 

Night School, College of Law: See 
under "Evening Session." 

Normal Classes:* See under "Teach- 
ers' Courses," also under "Edu- 
cation." 

Cbstetfics : 197. 

Officers of Administration of the 
University: 15. 

Operative Dentistry: 234. 

Operative Technique and Dental An- 
atomy: 235. 

Ophthalmology: 197. 

Options in Professional Schools: 41. 

Oral Surgery and Anaesthesia: 240. 

Oratory, College of: 286; 

Courses Accepted Toward the De- 
gree of A.B., 96; 
In College of Law, 217; 
In College of Theology, 264. 

Oriental Studies and General Litera- 
ture : 96 ; 
Theology, 260. 

Orthodontia: 240. 
Otology: 196. 
Pathology: Medicine, 184; 
Dentistry, 245. 



Ind 



ex 



365 



Pediatrics: 189. 

Pharmacology: 183. 

Pharmacy, College of: 267. 

Pharmacy : 269. 

Philosophy: 98. 

Physical Education: 100; 
High School, 309. 

Physicians and Surgeons, College of* 
158. 

Physics: 105; 

Admission, 38; 
High School, 308. 

Physiology: 55; 
Admission, 39 ; 
Medicine, 181 ; 
Dentistry, 243. 

Physiology, Hygiene and Sanitary Sci- 
ence : 273. 

Political Science: 107. 

Pottery : 295. 

Practice Court, The: 216. 

Pre-Legal Course: 208. 

Prizes: Liberal Arts, 153; 
Medical, 173; 
Law, 219; 
Dentistry, 234; 
Fine Arts, 295. 

Proctology: 194 . 

Professional Ethics : 250. 

Prosthetic Dentistry: 236. 

Psychology: 109. 

Public Speaking: Law, 217; 
Oratory, 287. 

Publications, Student: See under 
"Trojan" and under "El Rodeo." 

Pyorrhea Alveolaris : 239. 

Radiography: 241. 

Recitals: Oratory, 289; 
Music, 281. 



Recommendations for High School 
Teacher's Certificate, Departmental 
Requirements: See under Liberal 
Arts department in question. 

Registration: See under "Admission." 

Religious Education : 111, 257. 

Religious Privileges : 146. 

Required Subjects: Liberal Arts, 40. 
Civil Engineering, 126; 
Electrical Engineering, 132. 

Residence Requirements : 
Liberal Arts, 44; 

Graduate Department of Liberal 
Arts, 45. 

Rhinology: 196. 

Roentgenology: 190. 

Sacred Oratory: 264. 

Saturday Classes : 
Oratory, 289. 

Scholarships : 

Liberal Arts, 151 ; 
Fine Arts, 295. 

Science: Admission, 39. 

Sculpture : 294. 

Sociology: 116; 
Theology, 263. 

Sororities: Liberal Arts, 168; 
Law, 219. 

Spanish : 120 ; 

Admission, 37; 
High School, 305. 

Special Examinations: 
Liberal Arts, 44; 
Law, 209. 

Special Students: 

Liberal Arts, 34 ; 
Law, 206; 
Dentistry, 232; 
Pharmacy, 277 ; 
Fine Arts, 292 ; 
High School, 297. 



366 



University of Southern California 



Student Organizations and Publica- 
tions: Liberal Arts, 149; 

Law, 219; 

High School, 298. 

Summer Sessions: Calendar, 6; 
Liberal Arts, 155; 
Law, 216; 
Fine Arts, 295. 

Surgery: 194. 

Systematic Theology: 263. 

Teacher's Course: 
Music, 281; 
Fine Arts, 293. 

See also under "High School 
Teacher's Certificate." 

Teaching, Practice in: 73. 

Theology, College of: 254. 

Theology : Pastoral : 262. 

Therapeutics: 189. 

Theses : 

A.M., 47; 

B.S. in Civil Engineering, 131 ; 

B.S. in Electrical Engineering, 

136; 

Phar.B., 277. 

Toxicology: 180. 
Trigonometry : Admission, 38. 



Trojan: 149. 

Trustees, Board of: 
University, 12 ; 
Dentistry, 13. 

Tuition: See under "Fees." 

"Units" Defined: 
Admission, 33 ; 
Liberal Arts, 40; 
Medicine, 164. 

University, The : 

Board of Trustees, 12; 
Historical, 9 ; 

Advantages of Location, 10; 
Government and Organization, </, 

University High School: 297; 
Admission, 299 ; 
Courses, 302 ; 
Fees and Expenses, 301. 

Vocation Subjects: Admission, 39. 

Venice: 58. 

Women's Clubs: 148. 

Women's Halls: 147. 

Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. : 

Liberal Arts, 146; 
Medicine, 171 ; 
Dentistry, 222. 

Zoology: 55; 



N^ UNIVERSITY OF 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
BULLETIN 



Volume XIV 



MARCH 1919 



Number 1 




Year Book for 1918-1919 



University of Southern California 
Year Book for 1918-1919 



UNIVERSITY OF 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

BULLETIN 

Volume XIV MARCH 1919 Number 1 




Year Book for 1918-1919 

WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 
1919-1920 



Published Bi-monthly by the University 

Entered as Second Class Matter under Act of Congress, July 16, 1894 

Los Angeles, California 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

CALENDAR 

DIRECTORY 

THE UNIVERSITY: History and GovernmentZZZ 9 
Officers of Administration K 

The Faculty " jj? 

THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS: 

The Under Graduate Courses *i 

The School of Education ° dd 

The Graduate Department ;? 

Departments of Instruction..... £i 

Engineering rj 

General Information 1 r f 

The Summer. Session ZZZZZZZ 168 

THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS- 

General Statement ' 17n 

Departments of Instruction ZZZZZZZ 187 

THE COLLEGE OF LAW: 

General Statement 

The Curriculum ZZZZZ 220 

THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY: 

General Statement 9 ~. 

The Curriculum ?cj 

THE COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY: 

General Statement 272 

Departments of Instruction ZZZZZZZZZ 27S 

THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY: 

General Statement ?R r 

Departments of Instruction ZZZZZZZZ 287 

THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC " 299 

THE COLLEGE OF ORATORY Z.306 

THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 311 

THE UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL IZ 317 

CATALOGUE OF SUDENTS 330 

index :::i:z377 



CALENDAR 



Nov. 27 to 28 
December 20 . 



December 29 
February 5 . 
May 30 . . 
June 13 . . 
June 17 . . 



June 30 to Aug. 8 . 
September 24 to 27 
September 29 . 



February 2 to 7 
February 9 . . 
Mar. 27 to Apr. 3 
June 9 to 15 . 



Applying to all Colleges 
1919 

Thanksgiving Recess. 
Christmas Recess begins. 

1920 

Work resumed after Christmas Recess. 
Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
Memorial Day Recess. 
Baccalaureate Sunday. 
Commencement Day. 

College of Liberal Arts 
1919 

Summer Session. 

Registration for the First Semester. 

Instruction begins. 

1920 

Mid-year Examinations. 
" Second Semester begins. 
Spring Vacation. 
Final Examinations. 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 
1919 



June 16 to Sept. 6 
August 27 to 30 
September 2 



January 2 
March 2 . 



June 9 to Aug. 8 
September 8 to 19 
September 11 . 



January 20 

January 27 
May 11 • 



IrrTnce^fspecial Examinations and Registration. 

Instruction begins. 

1920 

Second Trimester begins. 
Third Trimester begins. 

College of Law 
1919 

Summer Session. ' 

Registration for the First Semester. 
Instruction begins, First Semester. 

1920 

Mid-year Examination and Registration for the 

Second Semester begins 
Instruction begins, Second Semester. 
' Final Examinations begin. 



The University 






September 16 
September 17 
September 26 



May 24 



October 8 . . 

January 26 . . 
February 9 . . 
Mar. 27 to Apr. 3 
June 2 . . . 



College of Dentistry 
1919 

Opening Assembly. 

Registration and Instruction begin. 

Registration closes for the year. 

1920 

Freshman and Junior Examinations begin. 

College of Theology 
1919 

Registration begins, First Semester. 

1920 

Mid-year Examinations begin. 
Second Semester begins. 
Spring Vacation. 
Final Examinations begin. 



October 6 
October 8 



February 2 to 7 
Mar. 27 to Apr. 3 
June 9 to IS . 



College of Pharmacy 
1919 

Registration begins, First Semeste 
Instruction begins. 

1920 

Mid-year Examinations. 

Spring Vacation. 

Final Examinations begin. 



College of Music 
1919 

September 15 . . . .Instruction begins, First Semester. 

1920 
January 29 . . . Second Semester begins. 



September 29 



February 2 . . 
February 9 
Mar. 27 to Apr. 3 
June 9 to 15 . 



College of Oratory 
1919 

Instruction begins. 

1920 

Mid-year Examinations begin. 
Second Semester begins. 
Spring Vacation. 
Final Examinations. 



September 29 



February 2 . 
February 9 . 
June 9 to 15 



College of Fine Arts 
1919 

Instruction begins, First Semester. 
1920 

Mid-year Examinations begin. 
Second Semester begins. 
Final Examinations. 



DIRECTORY 

THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Thirty-fifth Street and University Avenue. 

THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 
516 East Washington Street. 

THE COLLEGER LAW^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ 

THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 

Sixteenth and Los Angeles Streets. 

THE COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY 

Thirty-fifth Place and Hoover Street. 

THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

Thirty-fifth Street and University Avenue. 

THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

3201 S. Figueroa Street. 

THE COLLEGE OF ORATORY 

THE lA-i- Thirty . fifth Stree t and University Avenue. 

THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 

201 N. Avenue 66. 

THE UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL ^ 

THE UlM Thirty . fifth Stree t and University Avenue. 

THE MARINE BIOLOGICAL STATION 
Venice, California. 

„f thp colleges and yearbooks containing 
^rseofTurX^t^aiftpon app.Ltion to the Re g ,s- 
trar of the University. 



THE UNIVERSITY 

HISTORICAL 

In response to a general feeling that the interests of Chris- 
tian education demanded the establishment of an institution 
of higher learning in Southern California, plans were early 
matured which resulted in the founding, in the City of Los 
Angeles, of the University of Southern California. On July 
29, m the year 1879, the original deed of trust was executed 
by Ozro W. Childs, Isaias W. Hellman, and John G. Downey 
donors, to A. M. Hough, J. P. Widney, E. F. Spence, M. M. 
Bovard, G. D. Compton, and R. M. Widney, as Trustees. On 
August 8 of the following year, 1880; the incorporation of 
the University was effected under the title, "The University 
of Southern California." The name of the corporation has 
since been changed to "University of Southern California." 

The first Board of Directors consisted of eleven persons 
namely: A. M. Hough, Charles Shelling, E. F. Spence, P. Y 
Cool S. C. Hubbell, E. S. Chase, P. M. Green, J. G. Downey 
R. M. Widney, J. A. Van Anda, and F. S. Woodcock. These 
together with the trustees and the original donors of the 
trust, may be fairly held to represent the founders of the 
University. The corporation as at present constituted con- 
sists of thirty Trustees. 

1 T iH Ar * icIes of Incorporation provide that the Trustees 
shall be elected by the Southern California Annual Confer- 
ence of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

• Too e n firSt i buil ^ ing was erecte d on the present campus site 
in 1880 and on October 4 of the same year the institution was 
formally opened for the reception of students, and the work 
or instruction was begun. Men and women are admitted to 
a ; ' departments ^ of the University on the same conditions. 
Although requiring no particular religious faith of its instruc- 
tors and students, the institution, in accordance with the fun- 
damental aim pf its founders, stands for the effective promo- 
tion of Christian culture. 

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The government of the University is committed to a Board 

fL Y ^ rUSt u eeS ' I his Board has the P°wer to elect pro- 
fessors and other officers of instruction, to confer degrees 
to hS ? .1 : P ro Perty of the University Corporation, and 
to determine the general policy of the institution. 



10 University of Southern California 

Tlip p rP eident has charge of the educational administration 
of* Un&X "ndis chairman of the University jOgg. 
The orincipal administrative officers, other than the i resi 
dent, are the Deans, who have immediate charge of the work 
of the several faculties. 

The University Council is a representative body, consist- 
• f tu President and the Dean and the Secretary (or some 
oXr iemb of Se'acuUy) of each of the several colleges 
S is the duty of the Council to consider the courses offered 
by the several colleges with a view to increasing the effi- 
ciency and enlarging the range of University work, to en- 
courage original research, to adjust all questions involving 
moreAan one of the colleges and to advise the President 
upon such matters as he may bring before it. 

ADVANTAGES OF LOCATION 

Los Angeles is the metropolis of Southern California. Its 
nooulation of over 500,000 represents every State in the 
En aTd many foreign lands. ^>X£^^ 

don Song many lines, both cultural and professional. 
^The climate throughout the year is such rfc* .tourists from 
every quarter come to spend a part of the year, and many 
return to make this their permanent home. 
Vt £ the Greatest railroad center on the Pacific Coast. Four 

» kr?r£ssf »!-: 
g^pssngs* «■• Eg* .%*» 

Xf their discussion; and the resident population of the city 
°s sufficientfy Targe to afford important advantages for the 

S th y e1iv^ 10 vfeVplt k s m ortL S to e S of students in the 
niJe colllges make P their association an important cultural 

faC Tne Untel r sky e campus is in close proximity to Exposition 
the Grounds The State Building contains exhibits of he 
viable coluSons o! The Hi»»ri«l Soce.y of Southern 



The University ] | 

California, The Academy of Sciences, The Cooper Ornitho- 
logical Society, The Fine Arts League of Los Angeles, and 
numerous private collections. Because of their easy access 
these collections afford special advantages to the students and 
taculties of the University. 

The fifty-five acres of the park athletic grounds are avail- 
able and afford ample facilities for all outdoor sports, making 
a valuable auxiliary to Bovard Field with its new Stadium 
seating over 8000. 

THE FORWARD MOVEMENT 

The constantly growing needs of the University during the 
last decade have been the object of solicitous thought on the 
part of the administration, that adequate plans might be 
formulated to meet them. 

The Board of Education of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church included the campaign of the University of Southern 
California as part of the great Forward Movement The 
purpose was thus set to obtain an ample campus and to raise 
one million dollars for additional endowment. This campaign 
was carried to a successful issue during the spring- of 1918 
more than $1,227,000 being subscribed. At the present time 
there is being prosecuted a second campaign for an additional 
million dollar building fund. 

On March 30, 1917, the Board of Trustees announced that 
all the frontage on the west side of University avenue be- 
tween the present campus and Exposition Park had been 
secured. This fixes the status of the University as a city 
institution and assures an adequate campus in the present 
highly advantageous location. 



j2 University of Southern California 

OFFICIAL BOARDS 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Term Expires in 1919 
. ™ ™r T>rrwrT M r> Pacific Mutual Bldg. 

^X£^£*is^^ ^2— 

WILLIAM M BOWEN, LL.D. ™ „ Cs Bldg. 

HENRY W. BRODBECK, D.D.S £-*£ ^ 

5SS£S ^COOSW-ZZZZZ^ZZI^E.^ «. 

j^^^~ ^^^ 

ALFRED INWOODD.D Zu'n'ion Oil Bidg. 

ALBERT J. WALLACE, LL.D 

Term Expires in 1920 

„ _ ~ ..Pasadena, Cal. 

MERLE N. SMITH, D.D __- - d 

GEORGE I. COCHRAN, AM LL.D Pacific M 

WILLIAM F. CRONEMILLER ^^£t£S£r Bldg. 

JOHN B. GREEN, A.B., D.D »«» * 



JOHN B. GREEN, A «., u.u - 

EDWARD P. JOHNSON 

FRANCES M. LARKIN, PhD. 



EDWARD P. JOHNSON Francisco Cal. 

FRANCES M. LARKIN PhD ^Zld 728 B^enao St. 

CHARLES EDWARD LOCKE, D.D., LL.D Pasade „a, Cal. 

DON PORTER ; ~ Grant Bldg . 

A. E. POMEROY, A.M Pasadena Cal. 

FRANK G. H. STEVENS, A.B Pasadena, c 

Term Expires in 1921 

Santa Monica, Cal. 

JULIJUS A. BROWN .....-- Wh . nier; Cal . 

GEORGE L. HAZZARD, A.M. ^ w J6th gt 

EZRA A. HEALY. A.M., D.D —^ Mutual BWg 

william l ?:^tepS E nZZz:zz:izz s=r - 

FRANCIS Q. STORY — Beach> Cal> 

STEPHEN TOWNSEND Riverside, Cal. 

ERNEST P. CLARK 

Officers of the Board 

_ President 

BISHOP ADNA W. LEONARD IZ^Tvtoe-P"* 5 ^* 

J. E. CARR Second Vice-President 

S. P. MULFORD Secretary 

G^ORGErCOcriRANZZZZZZZ^asnZZd-Financia. Agent 

Note _Where no other city or town is mentioned, the address is nnder- 
stood to be Los Angeles. 



The University | 3 

Executive Committee 

BISHOP ADNA W. LEONARD 
GEORGE^ COCHRAN £*<$£?& 

^ M RC b E 0^ E B N° VARD ALB-ER H tTwALLACE 

TCI JUS A RROWM A - E - POMEROY 

S P MULFORD W - K CRONEMILLER 

' MUI -* UK1J CHARLES E. LOCKE 

BOARD OF CONTROL OF COLLEGE OF LAW 

GEORGE F. BOVARD, A.M., D.D LL D it ■ •. 

GEORGE I. COCHRAN, A.M., LL D Pacific " M utua 7^ 

GAVIN W. CRAIG, LL.M. J ae.fic Mutual Bldg. 

THOMAS W. ROBINSON, Xm. H^R „? R T 

FRANK M. PORTER A.B. LL.M T ^Z 

CLAIRE S. TAPPAAN 8 i7b! V 1 f 

JOHN B. GREEN, A.B., D.D Zfi" f*"* I 1* 

WM. M. BOWEN, LL.D... SpiExchange p ?' 

W. H DAVIS Washington Bldg. 

(-trADTc.c r. wt7V Pacific Mutual Bldg. 

CHARLES E. MILLIKAN, LL.M Ta0 B)d 

BOARD OF CONTROL OF COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 
AND SURGEONS 

GEORGE F. BOVARD, A.M., D.D LLD ru ■ 

CHARLES W. BRYSON, A.B., M D wZ'rt'T"™ 

F. M. POTTENGER, A.M., M.D., LL D c^T" 

W. W. BECKETT, M.D. GEORGE l'cOCHRAn' "a M IiTd 

°"vZ\\ B '' D °- FITCH C E ' MATTISON M.D D - 
J. H. SEYMOLR, M.D. GRANVILLE MACGOWAN, M.D. 

ADVISORY COUNCIL, MARINE STATION 

GEORGE FINLEY BOVARD, A.M., D D LL D tt • u 

GEORGE I. COCHRAN, AM LL D LLD - -•-••- Un.verstty 

EZRA A. HEALY. A.M., D D... . wTLTt 

ABBOTT KINNEY 36th St ' 

WALTER LINDLEy7'm.iT;''ll'.D 2 "o"o' 7 """«" Z^ C * 

GENERAL M. H. SHERMAN *°g± ^7" f'' 

ARTHUR B. BENTON ^f' ^'"T 

114 N. Spring St. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES, COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 

CHARLES D. LOCKWOOD, A.B., M D F A C S r, ■ , 

GARRETT NEWKIRK, M.D ' " ™ , Pres ' dent 

JAMES D. McCOY DDS Vice-1 resident 

J. WALTER GRAY DDS Secretary 

££« ^ BOVARD ' A.M.', D.D: LL.d'. D '"CAVE "dD 3 7"" 

CHAS. D. LOCKWOOD, D.D.S. CHARLES M. BENBROOK D.D.S. 



14 University of Southern California 

CONFERENCE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Term Expires in 1919 

T ^ T nrxrv r TT SCOTT H. E. MURKETT, C. P. MET- 
CHARLES E. LOCKE, C. H. s ^ Uii > *' Q p C LOCKE, 

CALF, EGERTON SHORE, A. M. DREW, U 
WILBUR G. FISKE. 

Term Expires in 1920 

~ tt tvt CTTTTTFRT AND W. E. TILROE, C. B. 

A. J. VISEL. 

Term Expires in 1921 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION PRESIDENTS 

LIBERAL ARTS'. 1241 w 47th St. 

Paul Arnold — : 

MEDICINE: 740 go. Bldg. 

Dr. Robert Dunsmoor 

DENTISTRY: Pa3 adena Chamber of Commerce 

H. F. Boeckman - 

FINE ARTS: 1133 w 36th pi ace 

Mrs. Bernadine Angus ■ 

LAW: . 605 California Bldg. 

A. L. Bartlett - 

MUSIC: 101 n. Fremont St. 
Dacotah Mistier 

ORATORY: 1046 w 35th Place 
Cheryl Millar : 

PHARMACY: 420 W . 46th St. 

Joseph H. Wright 

THEOLOGY: Victorville, Cal. 

M. K. Stone " 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
AND INSTRUCTION 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

GEORGE FINLEY BOVARD, A.M., DD LL D 

GEORGE ! re COCHRAN ) t A e M G r y LL d D HartUPee End ° wment 
TAUM TT treasurer and Financial Agent 
JOHN HAROLD MONTGOMERY, M.S., E.E. 

Registrar. 
THOMAS BLANCHARD STOWELL, Ph.D LL D 

Dean of the School of Education and Chairman of the Grad- 

uate Council 
CHARLES WILLIAM BRYSON A B M D 

FRANK MoTroVpORt'fT A^lTIT ^ Surge ° nS 

lewis eSgeVI r & u r.A L ™ 

„„., . • Dean °f the College of Dentistrv 
EZRA ANTHONY HEALY, A M S T D 

LAIRD JoWs^B^^I^S. D 

WALTER D F ?s n H ER th |K C E < E I £f ) °A f B PharmaCy 

WILLIAM ^^ juVsO^ ° f MUSiC 

ELI Z ABEra n Y0DER C0llege ° f Fine ArtS 

ALBERT BRi^^y^r^ 

HUGH CA^'eTwiIlETT Tm B * i0 '° giCaI S ' ati ° n 

MARYETTE n G: P MA CK h E e Y U TM rSity ^ Sch °°' 

STANLEY^VcCLUNG- ^"^ ° f Liberal ArtS 

™*t.^ Assistant Treasurer 

MABEL E. RUSSELLf 

t^axox,^ Assistant Registrar 

DAISYOLAH WILSON, A.B. 

™rAT,T,r^ T A ^ ting Assistant Registrar 

WARREN BRADLEY BOVARD * 

ROBERT l"HONN F F:R anCial ^ and Business Ma ™^ 

CHARLEs'rMILSK" and AsSt ' Business Mana gcr. 

CHARLoAltlAVS^RO^N' "^ ° f La " 

Librarian 
DEAN CROMWELL 

rwT7Q^T7o D u^°A' T ^ Competitive Athletics 
CHESTER HERBERT BOWERS, AM M D 

De^pm^r 111 " ° f W ° me « and> Lecture ^ - Health and 
CURTIS FERDINAND HUSE, 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

+r£ ] i! aVe °r a \ sencc whi] e in military service of the United State* 
tOn leave of absence while in war service of the United States 



16 University of Southern California 

THE FACULTY 

PROFESSORS 

t , ^ TTTXT 1227 S. Hoover 

CAROLINE A. ALCHIN 

Professor of Harmony. ^ ^ 

PAUL ARNOLD, PhM 

Professor of Mathematics. 

,, rrTlv . t, md * 502 Brockman Bldg. 

L GORTON AVERY, A.B., M.D 

Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

LILLIAN J. BACKSTRAND 320! S. Figueroa 

Professor of Voice Culture. 

GILBERT ELLIS BAILEY, A.M., Ph.D 972S Figueroa St. 

Professor of Geology. 

CATHRINE VIRGINIA BEERS, A.M 3517 S. Figueroa St. 

Assistant Professor of B.ology. ^^ ^ 

I EONE T. BERGE ■-.- 

Associate Professor of Interpretation. 

« » tvt 404 Stocker St., Glendale 

MYRTLE EMILY BILES A.M --404 Mocker 

Associate Professor of German. ...» 

KENNETH McLEOD BISSELL A.M , 7248 H.Hs.de Ave. 

Associate Professor of French. ^.^ 

^S^K^t^fc^nss-K - 

JOHN H. BLUMENBERG, Phar. B -_r Huntington Park 

^Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemtstry. 

EMORY STEPHENS BOGARDUS, A.M., Ph.D 1M3 W 41st St. 

Professor of »gy. ^ ^ 

PHIL BOLLER, A.B., M.D.* ----4 

^ Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 

MARGARET GRAHAM BORTHWICK, A.M. _ 343 W. 33rd St. 

MAR p < rofessor of the German Language and Literatur . 

ERNEST BRAUNTON ----- ; 

Professor of Landscape Gardening. 

EMMA FRANCIS BRIDGES 

Professor of Applied Arts. _ 

PTTTH WENTWORTH BROWN, A.M.. , 2659 Romeo St. 

RU ™S oV the Latin Language and Literature. 

^ nn ^«na Tv/r r> FAfS Brockman Bldg. 

' OH KffflSr B ^OT £&. FACS 

CHARLES C. BROWNING, M.D * "1 Memtt B!dg. 

■ Professor of Diseases of the Chest. 

CHARLES WILLIAM BRYSON, ^^■■^{faSSSTSir^Sr»8g. 
Dean of the College of Physician^ and Surgeons, and Professor 
of Gynecology, Abdominal and Clinical surgery. 

^TTeave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



The University \ 7 

KEMPER B. CAMPBELL, LL.M. Rln Pa1w . „. 

Professor of Torts, Real Property. 81 ° Cahfornia ™, 

HELEN HARRIS CHUTE , ?nn ~ „ 

Professor of Public School Music. Hoover St. 

LOREN T. CLARK, A.B R09 NT „ . f ni , 

Assistant Professor of Physics.' N " Hobart Blvd - 

EDNA AGNES COCKS, A.M n , y w „ . "^ 

Associate Professor of Physical Education. W * 31st St ' 

HORATIO COGSWELL, A.M. 1044 Va M 

Professor of Voice Culture. 1244 Van NeSS Ave ' 

&1 K^i^A* M - *** «« * Twenty-nrst St. 

GERTRUDE COMSTOCK, Ph. B. ton e w - f 

Associate Professor of Public Speaking^' 68 ° S ' Wltmer St 

CLARENCE WESTGATE COOK, A.M., B.S. (in C E ) 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 5932 "WoodTawn" Ave 

GAV Pr^or C ^ IG F,. LL3 /' QU T dge ° f ^ he SupeH ° r Court)....Court House 
LaJ, Secudties ^^ L " W ' Water Rights and ligation 

CLA A R s™Pafe SSSff of|™; *"- * D 515 *— — Bid, 

LILLIAN A. CUMMINS. ~ T ' . 

Professor of Public School Music '^d'Vo^CuTtu^ Wendale 

ANSTRUTHER DAVIDSON, CM., M.B., M.D.... 419 S Alvarado St 
Associate Professor of Dermatology. Alvarado St. 

JAMES MAIN DIXON, A.M., L.H.D FRSE 427 N A^™ a 

Director of Oriental Studies and Profesfor of TiteraSiVe ^ 

CLAUDE C. DOUGLAS, A.M 930 w „., „. 

Professor of Greek Language and Literature. W ' 35th St * 

E. LESLIE EAMES, D.D.S. Af ,,.«. ■ 

Associate Professor of Prosthesis" Auditorium Bid, 

DELLA TOTTON EARLY, M.A 3S7 w , 1ef Qt 

Assistant Professor of History. 57 W ' 51st St ' 

JULIO ENDELMAN, D.D.S. cu^ t r> .• 

EDGAR MAXMILIAN von FINGERLIN Ph D Q f M . 

Professor of the Italian and ^ I ^S^^l^ 0,,,pl 
RALPH TYLER FLEWELLING, A.M., S.T.B. Ph D t 

Professor of Philosophy. ' A ¥d m « ™v; A 

LEWIS E. FORD, D.D.S. f T^'™"' 

B2S4. the Co,Iege ^^^r^TF^^T^^ 

KATHERINE TORRANCE FORRESTER mi w 32d St 

Professor of the Spanish Language and Literature!" S 

F. W. FRAHM, D.D.S r „ , n ■ 

^Professor of 'Pro«I^i^^^cS^^S^ri^ol^ , ^ BW * 

tDeeia a sed.° f abSe " Ce wMe in mUitary service of the U " ; ted States. 
tOn leave, second semester 1918-'19. 



, 8 University of Southern California 

, T „ T . ....1259 W. 35th St. 

ALl Sso? A o%^ g Hsh ^ua^-and-Uterature. 

ARTHUR STANLEY GRANGER, A.B., M.D 705-710 Brochman B ldg . 

Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

LEWIS A, GROFF.. 

Professor of Mining Law. _ 

fnf Curator of ***** Museum. ^^ ^ 

PE ^esV^S al ^•-Cri.rnZProeeaure 

tl . T : TA T T -o 1101 Merchants' Nat. .bank uiag. 

BYR p° r ^or S of ^Ic^oSsTCaHfornia Code, 

ROSS ALLEN HARRIS, M.D . Broadway Central Bldg. 

R0S issitant Professor of Ophthalology. ^ % _ ^ ^ 

EZR ^ea A n ^ AeVaday S ^S" rf^^^TSr^^ ° f 

Systematic Theology ^^ ^^ 

»-E,£S£fe^ 8H jsth 

English Bible. . 

rrotesso. oi Auditorium Bldg 

HENRY W. HOWARD, M.D 

Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
WALTER LESLIE HUGGINS Ph. B.. *gj^£i££& : Re^Bldg. 
Associate Professor of Surgery 

ROCKWELL DENNIS HUNT, A.M., Ph. D 

Professor of Economics investment Bldg. 

JOHN CURTIS IRWIN A B. M.D 

J ° Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. ^^ 

BURT W. JOHNSON 

Professor of Sculpture Insurance Bldg. 

D. ARTHUR.JOHNSTON DDS .^^ is ^ 

Assistant m Pyorrhea Alveolans and udated Realty Bldg. 

-SS^^ffi^ 

* ^fo^^^^ 201 s Avenue66 

Wtt ^0£ L ^(^ S-^^">^"^«=S? of Art and 

Design. 1016 Gramercy Place 

GEORGE F. KENNGOTT B.D Ph. D I" 

Associate Professor of Sociology. Norwalk 

WI ^t^e^^ 

and Psychiatry. 
-^OnTeave of absence while in military service of the United States, 



The University ]9 

Wl ^^^ 1 S^^c^o gy G ° nSOlid - d **>» ™« 

BE \ T s?o A ci/ t ? S p E ^^ A ^ * «* W. 31st St. 

TULLY CLEON KNOLES, A.M., D.D 1024 W 31st St 

Professor of History. V " dlst bL 

LEWIS M. KOEHLER, Colonel U. S A 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics and'Comianding Officer 

JOHN JOHNSON KYLE, B.S., M D * 70? Ti*i. t tju 

Professor of Otology, Laryngology and" RhinoTo^ 02 TltIe IllS ' BId ^ 

EDWARD G. KUSTER , 9f)1 ~ F - c . 

Professor of Violincello. ' ^ 01 S ' Fl S ueroa St. 

WILLIAM RALPH LAPORTE, AM 

Professor of Physical Education. 

and Superintendent of the College xi^ioiogy 

^SSLWSSf L A J„S E ' B - S " CE 659 ^ A,6Xa " dr!a A -- 

F ^L^ t M ^e L s E o^ T S^ D e: 159 S - W — *~ 

ETHEL LEONARD, B.S., MD Mo u c + 

Professor of Bacteriology Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

ANDREW CREAMOR LIFE, A.M. . 1 370 w <*«, pi 

Professor of Botany. 37 ° W " 36th Place 

CHARLES D. LOCKWOOD, A.B., M.D., F.A.C.S. * Pasadena 

Professor of Oral Surgery. Pasadena 

LAWRENCE TYNDALE LOWREY, M.A., Ph.D 1083 W 35th St 

Associate Professor of History. bt 

GEORGE JESSE LUND, M.D. 41417 Al1r ,. fn . WA 

w ^™ te Professor « f otoi °^ ; ' '^ng^gy i2£L>^£r lds ' 

HOWARD LESLIE LUNT, A.M c™ n p a 

Associate Professor of Education 53 °° Pasadena Ave 

ARTHUR R. MAAS, Ph. C ; , 08 F ft .. Qf 

Professor of Pharmacy and Materia Medical Tharm" M 

GRANVILLE MacGOWAN, M.D c 27 w 7f , - t 

Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

MARYETTE G. MACKEY, A.M e77 Va] ^- Qf 

fc nf ^°T n 'r C , 0l J egC ° f Liberaj " Arts;"""and"" Assfs an^Pro" ^ 
fessor of the English Language and Literature 

ART A^ ^ p^ A / SCH ' *£~~ Merchants National Bank Bldg 

Assistant Professor of Medicine. ■ 8 

ROY MALCOM, A.M., Ph. D. *io q r- 1 1 

Professor of Political Science.' 619 S ' CarondeIet 

OLIVER JONES MARSTON, A.M. n «* w ,1 * c . 

Professor of Economics. H86 W ' 31st St 

FITCH C. E. MATTISON, M.D. * 

Professor of Clinical Surgery' ^"^ 5W( ^^" B^T.P«iiena 
HARRY J. McCLEAN, A.B 

Assista nt Professor of Sociology and Elementary "Law" 

$On leave. 

*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



20 University of Southern California 

Professor of Crimmal L.aw, v. Security Bldg. 

PFORGE WASHINGTON McCOY A.M., M.u 

GE °Sa« Professor of Ophthalmology. ^^ ^ 

JA^Sl^rf^A^^lSrBSE^^r^ Secretary of the 

Dental Faculty. Brockman Bldg. 

TOHN R McCOY. D.D.S ■•- 

JOH A N sso R oiate Professor of Orth°do»m. Security BMg 

THOMAS JEFFERSON McCOY, M.O 

Professor of Ophthalmology. ^ ...Brockman Bldg. 

JOHN McKENSIE BROWN. MB F.A.C.S 

Acting Professor of Oral Surgery. ^ ^ Washington Blvd. 

A. R. MCLAUGHLIN ^-^^y ^5" Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Assistant Professor of Physiology an ^ Security Bldg. 

^oLst Common ^aw L £SSZT™£1^ ^^ 
Conflicts of Law. 

FDWIN R. McMATH, A.M. .- : 

ED Associate Professor of Education. Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

LYLE GILLETT McNEILE 

Professor of Obstetrics. Ta - Bldg< 

w - W2^^2rfs^ra555>r security Bldg . 

CHAS. C. MONTGOMERY A j£j£*H^?™*ftH* ?*%£ 
Professor of ^qurty Jtmsp and Judgmen ts, Re- 

Stfof Trade, P puSfc Ur ComUssion Practice. 
^^eglt^o^roSr^d lessor Vph^cs and Elec 

trical Engineering. 502 Exc hange Bldg, 

VIN SIsor M ?f R ctd N e' KngrLaw''of-persons; Real Property,. 

Damages. ....Pasadena 

G % R ^Tch NE c r&^ 

tracts. Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

F AVERY NEWTON, M.D.....- : : 

*" Assistant Professor of Medicine Ave< 

ARTHUR WICKES NYE B lS.^M.E , t -- j^j^, 

Professor of Physics, and Director 01 . pJace 

FESTUS EDWARD OWEN, A.M 

Professor of Psychology. 

r RROMLEY OXNAM, A.M.* ---- ----- 

°- Sf Professor of Religious Eductton.^^ ^ ^^ ^ 
P. tH,PAE%» T5 — r- S -^„ r « s and Dis- 

fiSSST ST» of University Hospital aaj^ ^ ^ 

EDG E A m R eri^ L D M eL R ' tSEfcoXSZ. " pasadena 



The University 21 

CHARLES E. PEMBERTON fi78 c P r 

Professor of Violin, and Theoreticai" SubJe'cTs" B ^nigton Ave. 

ARTHUR M. FERRY 

Professor of Violin, and" BusTnes7M a ^e7"-orthe 10 Sl^ e 4 ^ St 

CHARLES EATON PHILLIPS, A B M D w w n , o 

Assistant Professor of Surgery 527 W ' 7th St - 

JAY PLOWE... 

Professor of Fiute. 14 P 7 Poinsetta PI. 

FRANK M PORTER, A.B., LL.M. T . m . 

FRANCIS M. POTTENGER, A.M., M D., LL.D .. 

Professor of Diseases of the Chest 110 °" 1 ™ C Insurai ^e"""Bldg. 

ANTONIO RAIMONDI * _ n c . 

Professor of Clarinet. 1660 Sh atto St. 

J. WALTER REEVES, A.B., M D m u c 

^Professor of Physiology and "g^oS" WiT^r^^ 8 *™ 08 Bldg ' 
WILLIAM W. RICHARDSON, M.D * « M P , 

Professor of Clinical Surgery UJ Brockman Bldg. 

LAWRENCE MELVILLE RIDDLE, AM 

..^ ° f the French Language and UteraTure ™ S ' HarVard 

SAMLEL RITTENHOUSE, Ph, D S7 „ r , , A 

Professor of Zoology. b/bZ Chesley Ave. 

JOSEF ROSENFOLD 

Professor of Violin.' 3102 Van Buren St. 

JAMES G. SCARBOROUGH, AB 1W w .. 

Professor of Code Pleading 5 Washington Bldg. 

ROY EDWIN SCHULZ, AB ' 

Professor of the Spanish Language : Alhambra 

ALFRED J. SCOTT, JR., M .D... nm q w - 

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Figueroa St. 

M. PAULINE SCOTT, A M 

A LL i s rr s Sw^ w - 36th st 

Associate Professor of Geology" 13 ° N " Ma nposa St. 

JAM a? S ? ARV£ Y SEYMOUR, M.D c n9 v , 

oS r ^y. JudidaI <&** =Tp5^^ 

G. S. SPEERS, D.DS 

Instructor in Oral Surgery' and 'Anesthesia': St ° ry BMg ' 

HAR A L s^iat S e^S E o?'Su A r g B er y M - D ^ -«-**«, B ldg 

LEON SHULMAN, M D * 

Assistant Professor of ' Diseases" "of "the ' Chest 845 S * Hi " St 

AXEL SIMONSON 

Professor of Violinceilo 3201 S ' Fl S uer °a St. 

WALTER FISHER SKEELE, A.B. n6 F . 

geanrf the College of Music und^^T^T*^ an/Spf " 
EVA MAE SMITH. A B 

Associate Professor of interpretation "" 1313 W " 8th St « 

RUTH MARIE SMITH ' „ m c £ 

Professor of Piano. U1 b * Figueroa St. 

*On leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



22 University of Southern California 

527 W. 7th St. 
ALBERT SOILAND, M.D 

Associate Professor of Gynecology. . ^ ^ 

L T«S E rP^a«i« of Applleo 

EDWARD L. SYMONDS, Lieutenant- U S. A 

Assistant to Commanding Officer R. O. T. L. ^ ^ ^ ^ 

w - IS^S&ps-^^ w 34th s , 

WELCOME A. TILROE A.B 

Assistant Professor of Latin. Brockman Bldg. 

F F THOLEN, M.D., D.p.S -- 

* Acting Professor of Oral Surgery. Wrig ht-Callender Bldg. 

DAVID D THORNTON, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Oral burgeiy. Washington St. 

C. ADELAIDE TROWBRIDGE 

Professor of Piano. 624 g_ spring St. 

E W. TUTTLE, LL.B 

Professor of Admiralty. 1435 w 2 3rd St. 

Mg&SFSWS™' Dfector---or-tne--Marine Bioiogica 

Station. ....948 Georgia St. 

S R. V ALENZ A - 

Professor of Harp. « 3040 S. Hoover St. 

ARTHUR S. VANDERS^^^ 

Assistant Professor of Materia i ^ Savings Bldg. 

CLAIRE T. VAN ETTEN LLR .^.. ^ BiUs and N t s . 

Substitute Professor of Torts, Keai r v i nve stment Bldg. 

M - %!^^Srxi^^rcs^rD^.^ rf Records 

A - F p^? E 5- fes M -?neSstrrand' MeSurgy (College of 
LER D OYlAM UEL WEATHEUBY, A.M., « D ™ W. 37* Drive 

Professor of Chemistry. M ± 1329 W. 59th St. 

ARTHUR CLASON WEATHERHEAD, A.M 

Professor of Drawing. 516 E. Washington Blvd. 

ttrANK R WEBB, M.D.- 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy. Insurance Bldg. 

WALTER F. WESSELS, M.D.-. 

Associate Professor of Medicine. ^ £ Washington S t. 

HARRY OSC^WH^D S -. E ^ logy _ 

Professor of Anatomy, myology £ Washington St. 

HORACE L. WHITE, Ph. D 

Professor of Biochemistry. Cleveland, Ohio 

^°&J^Tc£££^^- 2096 W . 3 0t„ St. 

J - ^esIo^^Eleftial^d'-Mcchanicar Engineering. 

1g"££ of. absence while in miiitarv service of the United States. 



The University 23 

HUGH CAREY WILLETT AM* 

Principal of the University Hi<rfT"^C7i a""? 21 ^' 37th Place 

fessor of Mathematics. 7 g Ch ° 01 a ° d Ass °ciate Pro- 

ORVILLE O. WITHERBEE, M.D S27 w 7fT -. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery 527 W - 7th St 

PAUL SPENCER WOOD, A.B... 10 , 9 r . lf A 

TVnnlTrZ ° f thC EngHsh L -^^e""and" Literature ° 52 Leight ° n AVC ' 
THOMPSON B. WRIGHT A M M r» tt- -^ , , 

Professor of Medicine. " Kinney-Kendall Bldg., Pasadena 

ELIZABETH YODER 

VISITING PROFESSORS 
SUMMER SESSION, 1918 
G. VERNON BENNETT A B 

anT&p^ E^n" 3 ™« School* Vocational Guidance 
LOUIS F. D. BRIOIS, A.B 

^T^L n !^ UCt ° r ^ FrCnCh ' ° rt0n SchoGl for Gi ^. French 
RICHARD BURTON, A.M PhD 

E[ttatur r e.° f EngHsh Li ** a ^ University of Minnesota. American 

C. WARD CRAMPTON, MD ' 

JULIA E. CRANE. 

££s oi aar M SM srae-sisa? Potsdam - N - y - 

HAROLD WELLMAN FAIRBANKS Ph D 
GEORGE ELLIOTT HOWARD, Ph D 

and trU p C ub.i c in SpI ea ? n n g g ' L ° S AngdeS *** N °™ aI S <^°> • Heading 
T0 ^ N S^ GN ?^^ B - J — «■ His t0ry , San Eernando 
ERNEST CARROLL MOORE, A.M., PhD LL D 

o^td's'choof A 8 dti„i?t ta atio? 0rmal Sch0i '- E ' d —^ ^thodol- 

S'p^.Jl n LLARD ' L - A - City B ° y Sc ° ut E-cutive. Scouting 
HERBERT INGRAM PRIESTLEY Ph D 

aSSSS £" r ° £ HiSt ° ry; U " iveVsity ° f California. Latin- 
DON FELIPE M. DE SETIEN 

Spanish?' ° f R ° manCe Lan «« a 8-, Leland Stanford University. 
LOUISE STANLEY, B.S., A.M., PhD 

Hou S .e"oW P S™& ° f H ° me Ec0n ° micS > U « ; -rsity of Missouri. 



24 



University of Southern California 



WI ^lUo H g°t M of°the C*n,ia State Fish and Gaate Co^ission. 

Commercial Fisheries. 

LECTURERS 

...Brockman Bldg. 
CHARLES L. ALLEN M- D -j"p^ 

Special Lecturer, College ot rny ^ ^^ Insurance Bldg. 

W. S r ALLEN, ^•'p^^nr(Cw^i5Sg), 

Lecturer in Real Propeity x±± v i6Q4 w 39th St> 

CTTO BAMES, M.D - 

Lecturer in Therapeutics. n56 ^ 55th St _ 

HARRY H. BASKERVILLE 

Lecturer in Economics. Forty-eighth St. 

-WALTER A. BAYLEY, M.D 1216 W ' 

Lecturer on Surgery. 1015 Hollingsworth Bldg. 

™<2^VSSS^cSfe=s^ 732CeresAve . 

■p, o BTNZ 

J^^SS^^* A.B. 0--...1. - d eY, 5 B, d , 

District Court) .....-- ----- : 

CHE^TeThERbIkT BOWERS, A.M., M.D 3X22/, Vermont Ave. 

Lecturer in Pediatrics. Story g|^g. 

BER L T ect B u?e^A S£tS=SHS^ra=^I parade St. 
GEORGE WILEY BROOME, A.B., M.D A 

Lecturer in Surgery. Brunswig Drug Co. 

L N. BRUNSWIG ---"""---."■""""^"■"•""" (CoTlege'of Pharmacy.) 

Lecturer in Selected Business Topics. ^ ^g ^^ ^^ ^ 

E. A. BRYANT, fJX ^--—~—r^- "and Surgeons. 

Special Lecturer, College 01 rujj g5i g> Hope St> 

SARAH E. BUNDY. - 

Lecturer in Sociology. California Bldg. 

INGLE CARPENTER, Ph. B., LL.B '"" 

Lecturer in Dental Jurisprudence. ^ Reid ^ 

MURIEL CASS, M fe"VwSrS5 Examiner. 

Special Lecturer m H y« ie "* * nd /L M D * ..Brockman Bldg. 

ALBERT TUTTON CHARLTON, A.B., M.D - 

Lecturer in Surgery. 1810 Avalon St. 

ALMA MAY COOK 

Lecturer in Art. 1Q19 Hollingsworth Bldg. 

A. B, COOKE, A ' M > ^;"^'phy S rcians''and Surgeons. 

Special Lecturer, College of Ptiysicia ^ Higgins Bldg. 

W. T. CRAIG, Ph.D. :- - 

LeCtUre ;^,MmCS M D 1240 Merchants National Bank Bldg. 

BM ffiS2^^^"S^^ «* SUrge ° nS - Ex position Park 

FRA |p!ci!i ES^E ^J^™^ L ,. Inve stment Bid, 

WIRT BRADLEY DAKIN, M^>— ;» 4 ° 3 ^ 

Lecturer in Genito-Unnary Diseases. B aker-Detwiler Bldg. 

ROBFRT VERNE DAY, M.D....-- 

Lecturer on Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

. . ... • unitary service of the United States. 

*On leave of absence while in military serv 



The University 25 

*CHARLES W. DECKER, M.D... TT Q A A 

Lecturer on Surgery. U - S - A - A* E. F. 

W. R. DICKINSON 

Lecturer in Economics in Fhirmary Dickinson Drug Co. 

REX DUNCAN, M.D. 

Lectures on First Aid to" the" Injured Investment Bldg. 

HENRY WIRT EDWARDS, B.S., M D M u c 

Lecturer on Surgery. Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

J. EUGENE FAHY, A.B M D * 

Lecturer in Diseases of the Chest 206 W * 10th St 

JAM Ju^).. GIBSON ^x.Sup r e m e Court Commissioner and Superior 

Lecturer in Appeals." '. Merchants Nat'l Bank Bldg. 

ARTHUR F. GODIN, M.D - snn A A . . 

Assistant Professor of Medicine Auditorium Bldg 

P. L A. GRAHAM, LL.B ' .„ __. . 

Lecturer in Patents. 933 Higgms Bldg 

GEORGE L. GREER, AB LL B 

Lecturer in Medical Jurisprudence " 1012-14 Hibernian Bldg 

WILLIAM HAZLETT, LL.B. " *m t - , a . 

Lecturer in International Law USt & Savm S* Bldg. 

JOHN HEDLEY 

Lecturer in Missions Redondo Beach 

CHARLES W. HILL..' 

Lecturer on Industrial Chemicals 623 San Pedro St. 

K S. INUI, A.B... 

Lecturer in Japanese "Sociology 2308 W ' Pico St. 

JOHN L. KIRKPATRICK, M.D ,, , 

Lecturer on Surgical Applied 'Anatomv Brockman Bldg. 

LAWRENCE L. LARRABEE, Ph B LL B ™ t 

Lecturer in Insurance and Taxation e Insuran ce Bldg. 

E. E. LEIGHTON 9 

Lecturer in Pharmacal Jurisprudence California Bldg. 

ERNEST J. LICKLEY, J.D. 

Lecturer in Education 850 N - Mariposa Ave. 

FORBES LINDSAY 

Special Lecturer in Economics 6767 Yucca St 

EDMUND WILLIAM LITTLEFIELD M D 

Lecturer on Gynecology. ' D Haas Bldg. 

EDWARD DALAND LOVETOY at^ Mn 

Lecturer on Dermatology ' ' M ' B 1202 B ^ckman Bldg. 

A. W. LUFKIN, D D S 

Chief Demonstrator MTAssis^T^Hiito^ C ° 1Iege ° f Dentistr y 

OLGA McNEILE, MD 

Lecturer in Obstetrics. 626 Mars h-Strong Bldg. 

ROBERT P. McREYNOLDS B S M n 

Ksir's "Lsir^ "'-= ,M1 w - M " st 

Lecturer in Accounting. 3474 University Ave. 

N. H. MORRISON, M D 

^ ial Lecturer ' College" orPhy7ic"ians""and"Surgeon s : KerCkh0ff BId * 

*In Military Service. 



26 University of Southern California 

Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

L D f eS E 1n "fe^^^" 5 ^*^" CUrat ° r 

oi the Dental College Museum. - Brockman B ldg. 

C. W. PIERCE, ^ D - T — 35= ^e" ExSnina'rion: 

Lecturer on Life Insurance w gan Francisco 

"^W il^'^^^T^SSS Sts, San Diego 
PETER C. ^N DI ™ k Se-S«i««. 

L. iSS^ST^ M D. • « N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena 

Lecturer in Surgery. 27 g Gran( j Ave. 

T W ROBINSON, A.M -------- 

Lcturer in Statutory Interpretation. ^ & BHghton 

CARL ROS™^ ---;--,-." (ColTege""of"" Pharmacy.) 

HER^R^AUG^S^SENKRlNZ, A.B., M.D !0 2 4 Stor y Bid, 

HER L B efturer in Genito-Urinary Diseases. ^^ ^^ ^ ^ 

L - SJrer Tn' Commercial"pharmacy. ^ Dorchester St. 

* C L e S c^e L r°^o& Bank Bld , 

RO I^S^^- =-^ Consolidated Realty Bldg. 

c ^^^eorPhy^ teS= - Bank Bld , 

NORMAN STERRY, LL.B 

Lecturer in Advocacy. Consolidated Realty Bldg, 

L. B. STOOKEY, A.M., L^V^JiS^'and Surgeons. 

Special Lecturer, College of Pnysicia ^^ Crockett Blvd. 

T ATTRA C SWARTZ - ; 

Instructor in Physical Education. 3 ^ Grfffin Me 

EMORY W. THURSTON .. 

Lecturer in Prescriptions. ^ Kerckhoff Bldg. 

A. TYROLLER, U '^":r~-"''"i Physicians "and" Surgeons. 

Special Lecturer, College of 1 nysic ^.^ Mutua l Bldg. 

C A WAYNE : 

Lecturer in Economics. 3927 wiscons i n g*. 

Lecturer in Surgery. 

,NSTRUCTORS, ASSISTANTS, AND DEMONSTRATORS 

FRANK D. AID. A.B. - 

Field Instructor in Surveying. 610 StQry Bldg# 

- IS ^^^^ofcanaFTe^^ 

^TTeave of ahsence while in military service of th. United States. 



The University 27 

C. PALMER BALLARD D D S r 11 r t^ . 

Demonstrator. ColIege of dentistry Bldg. 

H. M. BARNHART, D D S r n £ ^ . 

Demonstrator.. Colle ^ e of dentistry Bldg. 

L. M. BAUGHMAN, Ph G D D S r^n t ^ • 

Demonstrator. ' College of Dentistry Bldg. 

WALTER A. BAYLEY, M.D 121 . w AM c 

Instructor in Surgery. 1216 W ' 48th St - 

BERTHA BEAUDRY 

Assistant in French. 

A. A, BLATHERWICK, M.D fi1nn M , A 

Instructor in Obstetrics. 00 Moneta Ave. 

E. R, BRONSON, D.D.S. rr,n t ^ ■ 

Demonstrator. College of Dentistry Bldg. 

RAY BROWNSON, D.D.S. 91Q -p Ju 

Demonstrator (College o7' Dentistry) : Bradbury Bldg. 

D. H. CALDER, M.D. 7 z 9 at m - u - 

Instructor in Neurology.' N " Mlchl S an Ave., Pasadena 

RAY A. CARTER, M.A., M.D. * ~ 711 r , . . 

Instructor in Therapeutics Central Ave. 

JOSEPHINE CHAMBERS, C.F.A , Q o n -. A 

Instructor in Metal Work and Jewelry ° Dalt ° n Ave " 

MARIE S. CLARKE 

Instructor in Advanced Art "History 

•MONTAGUE CLEEVES, B. A., M.D* 1S01 s v 

Instructor in Pediatrics. 01 S ' Fl & ue roa St. 

WILLIAM R. CLEVELAND, B.S., MS <n* r w u- 

Instructor in Chemistry. ' 516 E< Washington St. 

F. HARRY CRAM, D.D.S. AT , c 

Demonstrator. Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

MAXWELL M. DIXON, D.D.S. 

AT^n° nStrat0r ^ ° ral Fr °^y la ^''^'Pyorri^''Xl^^i ry dg ' 

ALFRED J. DOWNS, M.D 7n n ^ t T 

Instructor in Gynecology l ' J° hns on Bldg. 

ROBERT M. DUNSMOORE, M.D 1104 , r , 

Instructor in Electrotherapy HU4-6 Garland Bldg. 

AMEEN U. FAREED, M.D....! i« xr p ^ c 

Instructor in Medicine. J5 N * Bere ndo St. 

LOUIS FELSENTHAL, D.D.S., M.D.. Van N P1 , 

Instructor in Medicine. Van Nuys Bld &- 

H. GALLAGHER, M.D, * no , , T . e 

Instructor in Medicine. 6 Marsh -Strong Bldg. 

ALMA GILCHRIST 

Instructor in French. (College'of'Fine Arts") 

LEWIS D. REMINGTON, M.D, * M . „ , 

Operatory Manager. Monrovia, Cal. 

GARNET BERKE GRANT, B.S., MD «< r w u- 

h Smin/* 10 "' ta ^^'^" ssssr st - 

M 4 J" StrUCt0r in EacTerioiogy "and 'Assistant- 'in C cte e Sst°, f y ^""^ Bld * 

MARGUERITE HAUBER " „ n ' w . 

Assistant in Piano. 800 b ' Fl Sueroa St. 

L. C. HOUGHWONT, D D S r 11 r ™ ■ 

demonstrator in RWfeSMtaST Or^lTjy ^^ ^ 

*In Military Service. 



Z8 



University of Southern California 



HENRY JAMES - 

Instructor in Journalism. ^ Investment B ldg. 

SIMON H. JESBERG M.D _ -£--5-7 7nd"Throat. 

Instructor in Diseases of Lye, i.ai, 1 u B1(]g 

CLARENCE A. JOHNSON, A.B., M.D 

Instructor in Medicine. Brockman Bldg. 

MAURICE KAHN, M.D , 

Instructor in Surgery. Consolidated Realty Bldg. 

H C KING, D.D.S ------ 

Demonstrator in Porcelain Work. Azusa 

WM. KREBS : 

Instructor in Drawing. SfQry Bldg< 

RICHMOND C. LANE, D.D.S. * ; 

Assistant in Oral burgery. 5Q1 ^ SotQ g t< 

MARIAN LEAVER, B.F.A.... 

Instructor in Art and Design Investment Bidg. 

RICHARD C. MacCLOSKEY B,S M.D 

Instructor in Diseases of the unesi. ^ y ^ h gt 

CLOYD HECK MARVIN, A.M - 

Instructor in Economics. ^ N Fremont St. 

DACOTAH MIZENER - 

Assistant in Piano. Marsh-Strong Bldg. 

DWIGHT S. MOORE, M.D 

Instructor in Medicine. Kerckhoff Bldg. 

WAYLAND A. MORRISON, A.B., M.D 

Instructor in Surgery. 1Q45 w 35th p lace 

EMERY E. OLSON, A.M 

Instructor in Economics. Baker-Detwiler Bldg. 

GLADYS E. PATRIC, M.D ■---■-;.- 

Instructor in Diseases of the Unest. Brockman Bldg, 

ADRIAN B. PERKEY, M.D - 

Instructor in Medicine. College of Dentistry Bldg. 

H. P. PETERSON, D.D.S 

Demonstrator. 52 7 W. Seventh St 

GEORGE PINESS M.D 

Instructor in Medicine. College of Dentistry Bldg, 

A. C. PRATHER, D.D.S 

Demonstrator. College of Dentistry Bldg. 

B. L. REESE, D.D.S - 

Demonstrator. gl0 Brockman Bldg. 

HENRY MICHAEL ROONEY, M.D 

Instructor in Obstetrics. u51 w 2Qth § t 

JOSEPH H. SAINT-JEAN 

Instructor in French. g40 w 36th St 

S ' S ^tmctor"'in'the Japanese Language. 



ELSA SCHROEDER, A.B. 

Assistant in French. 29Q9 Kenwood Ave. 
S. VIRGINIA SMITH A.B 

Instructor in English. 239 -^ c ot o St. 

MARIAN L. SPRUNK : 

Instructor in Art and Desigm ^ ^ Investment Bldg. 

WILLIAM FRED STAHL M.D £ — - s - ^^ 

Instructor in Diseases of Lye, n.ar, m 
—Ton leave of absence while in military service of the United States. 



The University 29 

J. A. STOCKER, D.D.S. r„n * r^ ■ 

Lecturer on Dental Anatomy Hege ° f Den tistry Bldg. 

J. W. STONE, M.D m ^ . 

Instructor in Diseases of the" Chest Merntt Bldg. 

BYRON POLK STOOKEY, A.B., M.D * . 9 c o f ni . 

Instructor in Surgery. 625 Stor y Bld &- 

P. O. SUNDIN, M.D „ w XT „ 

Instructor in Obstetrics. • HeIIman p >ldg. 

LYMAN ELANSON THAYER M D snn t a t 

Instructor in Obstetrics L ' - A - Investment Bldg. 

E. J. THEE, D.D.S... r „ „ e ^ . 

Demonstrator College of Dentistry Bldg. 

m t£^£W'8£ i JS£ ™ w - *-*** s t . 

^aSSKP&ftfeJ^- M - D - * ™ M-h.St.on, BU, 

A. C. VIEILLE, D.D.S. r 11 r r. . 

Demonstrator. College of Dentistry Bldg. 

EDITH L. VIRDEN 

Instructor in Art. 1674 W - 12th St. 

MRS H. C WADDELL ? , m ^ 

Assistant in Piano. 24tM Hope St. 

JAMES G. WARE, A.B., B.S., M.D w w Q 

Instructor in Roentgenology and' Electrotherapy "" W " Seventh St 

AVA CLARISSA WELLS 

Instructor in Art and Design anta Ana 

CAROLINE M. WOOD " S47t/ Q _ J e 

Instructor in Art and Design /2 b ' Leren do St. 

BEATRICE WOODDELL *m * • 

Instructor in Chemistry. 319 Anzona A ™., Santa Monica 

CLARENCE E. WORTH D D S n ,-j * « 

Demonstrator of Porcelain Work." Consolidated Realty Bldg. 



Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 

Department 



PRACTICE COURT DEPARTMENT 

Charles E. Millikan, L.L.M., Instructor. 

JUDGES 

1— -Kemper B. Campbell, LL.M. 
2— W. S. Allen, A.B. 

f~"i?r e ? artn lf nt 3 ~ Waltpr Bowers, LL.M 
3— Walter Bowers, LL.M 
4— A. A. Kidder, Tr., LL.B. 
5— Ewald Selph, LL.B 
6— O. R. W. Robinson, LL.B. 
7— C. L. Bagelv. LL B. 
8— Hugh N. Wells, LL.M 
9— Ralph A. Ch^se. LT B 
10— Thomas P. White, LL.B. 

12— J. M. Wright, LL B 
1a~~El *V Back "s, LL.B. 
14— Charles E. Millikan, LL M 



Appeals 



Gavin W. Craig (Judg, 



Bxa«nt^otfAi&arb!a'&- a c 



ounty). 
geles County). 



30 University of Southern California 

OFFICE ASSISTANTS AND OTHERS 

MRS W L. ANTHONY, 

Clerk, College of Dentistry. 

HE St F22V- of ft. Treasurer. 

ALI ^no B gYaphe S r: College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

MRS H. B- DOWNES, _ 

Clerk, College of Dentistry. 

NELLE E. EDGINTON 

Secretary to the President. 

WILLIAM T. GILLILAND, A.B., 1 Secretari es, Y. M. C. A. 
DALE H. REED, J 

ROB S E ec R rIta?y^o E .Se H of N pSns and Surgeons. 

L °^tLTC O*- of the Registrar. 

\NNETTE F. HUNLEY, 
Clerk, College of Law. 

CE S,C Physicians and Surges. 

MRS C,e ELL of Clfn^Collcge of Physicians and Surgeons. 

WFSTON E. LEARNED, 
WE Assistant Librarian, College of Law. 
EDITH BERNICE LOVELAND, 
Library Assistant. 

AMY Sec I fei R ry H to the Dean, College cf Physicians and Su.gcons. 
^-S^a^ t^ D^Sge of Music. 
-^^"er^D^tSS^f' Chenristry. 

VIR S^fSI'o f Pine Arts. 

CLAY ROBBINS, 

Librarian, College of Law. 
RUTH LUCIA WATSON, A.B., 

Library Assistant. 

MRS Ac EL n L t A nf; cXFof Dentistry. 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

ORGANIZATION 

The College of Liberal Arts is organized into Undergrad- 
uate Departments and a Graduate Department 
of AT/f r m £J OI \ cours t es > Jeading to the degree of Bachelor 
meif* ' R 1 ere A m hC fo " owi "g Undergraduate Depart- 
K biology, Chemistry Economics, Education, English, 
French, Geology, German, Greek, History, Journalism Latin 
Mathematics Oriental Studies, Philosophy, Physks Physical 
Education Political Science, Psychology^' Religious Educa- 
tion, Sociology and Spanish. S 

Four year courses, leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Engineering, are offered in Architecture, Civil, 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. ' ' 

The Departments of Agriculture and Mining Engineering 
at present offer only the first two years of a four yea^r course 

Ari^ V n C0UrSe n are - alS0 T°, ffered in the Departments of 
Art and Design, Drawing, Italian, Music and Oratory. 

The Graduate Department .offers courses leading to the 
degree of Master of Arts in Biology, Chemistry, Economics 
Education, English, French, German, Greek, History LaHn' 
Mathematics Oriental Subjects, Philosophy PhJS Pol S 
cal Science, Psychology, Religious Education and Sociology 
It also offers courses leading to the University Recommenda- 
tion for the High School Teacher's Certificate in bToIo^ 
Chemistry Economics, Education, English, French German 
Greek, History Latin, Mathematics? Physical EducS' 
Physics, Spanish and Sociology. ' 

THE UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION 

There are three classes of admissions to the undergraduate 
courses: (a) admission to Freshman standing; (b) admission 
to advanced standing; and (c) admission as a special sTudent 

STANDTNr IDA T E K S F °, R AD .MISSION TO FRESHMAN 
bTANDING must be at least sixteen years of age and must 
present evidence of good moral character. They must Tso 
deac'ribi?" - b 7 cert ' ficate or b ^ examination L hereaf er 
tnrv «X ■' 7 lde " ce °^ P/eparation in fifteen units of prepara- 

scribed ntfn Cted fr ° m the # eneral list of subjects 5 de- 
scribed on the following pages. For admission to the course 



32 University) of Southern California 

leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts these fifteen units 
must be made up as follows: 2 ^.^ 

English 2 

A Foreign Language j 

Laboratory Science ... 2 

Algebra and Plane Geometry.. x 

United States History and Civic- - ? 

The^aiory science may be 1^7 Zoology, Physiol- 
^aSsion SThe Curses in Engineering the fifteen 
units must include the following: ^^ 

English ... 2 

A Modern Language — " x 

Chemistry /"_........"*. 1 

Physics -- 1 

Elementary Algebra ! 

Advanced Algebra x 

Plane Geometry --- - 1 

Trigonometry and Solid Geometry -,- * 

United States History and Civics --- 4 

Electives 

Complete List of Admission Subjects 

Eng. Grammar and Comp 1, lg 1^^^^^^-^^ { 

English Literature 1, Zy4 A geo Advanced 

Latin, Elementary - - S^ Geometry 1 

Latm, Advanced Trigonometry g 

Greek, Elementary ^ £ ^ tf 

Greek, Advanced "Rotanv J 

German, Elementary - \ ^any j 

German, Advanced 1, - %l°^ try J 

French, Elementary - 2 ^emi s tiy 

French, Advanced *. 2 ^ys ^s 

Spanish, Elementary -- j ^S Geography 

Spanish, Advanced 1 j giy g 

History, English ........... Freehand Drawing ft* J 

. Mission by te^^^^^l^Zt 

a regular course m the Umve s£y High -£100^0 ^ the 

versity or in an accredited high school, « . certifi . 

Freshman class with gat examination, on present^ . g 

only ^^trYnce^su^trin which the candidate ,s specifi- 

callv recommended. . 

C The Faculty reserve, the rijh. however •» -J-',," », 

Sr, S^.«^«gjo, A«- -T 

be obtained by applying to the Registrar. 

week. 



The College of Liberal Arts 33 

Admission by Examination. Entrance examinations in all 
the required admission subjects not covered by certificate 
from an accredited school are held in September CemnCate 

V^C^ N S D T I ^Sl E N S G?° R o ( t D oTpfJ° N WI ™ AD " 

and a letter W^iT 1 .,?' *« subject's there presented for entrance 
and a letter of honorable dismissal. The Faculty reserves the riJh? tn 

£™,*',.',"s,; ;s,.i " "••• -» »"<•'»■ «■' ssAXS 

take up special work in one department, or in one subject 

c V andidates re for e a d H branChe K S - l"^ Spedal indents are no 
satisfvfnt thl , greeJ bUt - hey may become candidates by 
satisfying the entrance requirements for a regular course 
Such students come under the same regulations as regular 
undergraduates and forfeit their privileges by failure to 
maintain a good standing. y lduure to 

DESCRIPTION OF ADMISSION SUBJECTS 

J.J' i Eng ' isl ? Grammar and Composition. It is expected that the canH; 

mmmsm 

fre made *£ 8hman Enghsh under ^ circumstances until all deficiencies 
devofedlo the worlcl UnitS ' aCCOrdin * t0 *• ™™^ of high school years 

mmmmm 



34 University of Southern California 

study, within the classroom, of ; ..number -of book. . «rang« £ in a^pro- 
gressive course; by the pupil's "^ '^"X ^ stage of mental devel- 
not less than ten books a year of ^P^totraction i* the use of library 
opment in which he then 1S ;, f ^ ^y some mstrucuon ^ d 

machinery and practice m thp -use of r «Yoh sh ould not be so fixed upon 
be taught to read carefully, b . u tJ"? ^"^'^"se and charm of what he 
details that he fads to "PP'^.^L™^ to" ew a literary work of 
reads. In other words, T he -^.f d betaitgf i :v ° { f the book g 

art as a unified whole. In the latter part oj the jours and 

should be read with special care, greater stress b a e ^ g th al< und P erst a„ding of 
style, the exact meanings o* words *"d pl£ sses^and tn should 

allusions. The student should ^ trained in reaomg , and fa 

encouraged to commit to memory «o table P assag es £ ^ ^ ^ wfaat 
£rhksi\rnrd S tontrXI°X e ^erpretation of literature to passages 
which he has not read before. 

A brief outline of the history of English l^^ft™* $ 
salient characteristics of the »«c^»ve hterary fts most prominent authors 
LMSEfc.'"^ SS«f ^M** some time in the last two 
years of the course. 

(Credit- 1 to 2/ 2 units, according to the number of h.gh school year, 
devoted to the candidate's English courses.) 

types should unquestionably be included. 

i '^if^r^^^^o^^rJ; of' Books XI, 
XIII XIV, XV, XVII, and XXI).-The "^neid." 

Group 2. Drama, ^^^^^^^^^^^ 
"The Merchant of Venice. — As Y ™ L ' te T V n >._«R ic hard lV--"Rich- 
^ni-'-^ry ^"colidUnu&'-inlts Caesa,"-"Macbeth."- 
^aml I e I t."-lhe nr s y toops to Con q ue,"-"The Rivals." 

Group 3. ^pf^fp^stUK^utffi Travis" (th 
SSS^MS&t "amiT B^f gnag^-Defc^ ^s^na!" 
P.S ^.-Goldsmith's "Vicar °f Wakefield • -*'££ »J|«JS Edgeworth's 
-Any of Scott's novels -Any of Jane^stensnove noyels _ A of 

"Castle Rackrent • or The Absentee Any ^ o Gaskell's "Cran- 

Thackeray's novels.— Any of George kliot^ovei. the W ake."-Reade's 
ford."-Kingsley's "Westward Ho 1 or II erewa ™>J „ Las( . D 

"The Cloister and the Hearth or Griffith Oaun^y „ Tom BrQwn , s 
of Pompeii."-Blackmore s ■ Lorna 'D°°ne "Kidnapped," "The Master 
Schooldays."— Stevenson s treasure Islanai,^ "Captains Cour- 
of Ballantrae," or "Dr. Jekyll "jdMr^de- £S novels.-Selected 
ageous," "Kim," "The Jung e Books Any m y. V Gables " or "Twice 
tiles from Poe.-Hawthorne's The Ho u se^ the j>eve ^^ R;se 

Told Tales" or "Mosses fr° ma "?iVi st er's "The Virginian."-Cable's 

^^S^^^F^ standard authors * such as 

B?i d Harte'Aldrich, Page, Hale, and Barr.e. 

Gr onp 4. Essays, Biography etc Addisor [J^^J^^ilfi 
Coverly Papers" or se ec ion » *™ ^..dpSiklin's "Autobiography."- 
tions from Boswell's „ L,fe .,;° f H J° n " S uS America."— Washington's "Fare- 
Burke's ''Speech on. Co»c.hat,on wrth^merc^ s ^ of 

well Address."-Irying s ^ ,f " ^Lockhart's "Life of Scott" (selec 
Nelson."— Lamb's "Essays of Elia. LocKnan 



The College of Liberal Arts 35 

coin (including at least the "Soeerh S r n ° ratl T ° r n - ""Selections from Lin- 

Sls^o^^^ 

Lowell (about 150 pages) -Holmes' 'S^i ^ Sd ^ cte ?, essa y s fl ™ 
Bu rroughs . essays, sefected).- Warners °T„ * th, 'w-?/"" 88 ?, Tab ! e '"- 
"Prue and I."— Curtis' "Publir K nf pj * Wilderness. "_ Curtis' 
"An Inland Voyage" and "Travels^!, f, dU ^ te t Men."-Stevenson's 
ography" and selections from "rt Q Donkey."— Huxley's "Autobi- 

Improving Natural Knowledge A & F i ,nd f u . din K the addresses on 
Chalk—Hudson's "Idle Days fi PataeonS" Elation and. A Piece of 
sissippi."— Riis's "The Making „. f 1 —Clemens' "Life on the Mis- 
drances to Good Citilensfdn "Li 'li <" eTlc , aa - -Bice's "The Hin- 

DeQuincey, Hazlitt,' Emer P „, and la to write r^Trm? ? aCOn i ^ amb ' 
by various standard writers. writers.— A collection of letters 

Burns-PalVrave's^Gofden'Tr asury P^st Series)""' SoTtS "^ a " d 

"«sro>°s u T^ K ^ 

and "The Deserted Vffla^»!^ p^^^ I ^»" h, « T "The Traveller" 

Byron's "Childe Harold" canto TTT ^ TV i\.^ and T , • Kubla Kahn."— 
-Scott's "The Lady of the Lake" or -^M™* Fhe £**»«■ of Chillon." 
Ancient Rome," "The Battle of Nasebv ^^^a M / Ca . nUjr ' s "Lays of 
Tennyson's "The Princess "or "ThfrwA- t \ Armada," and "Ivry."— 

"Gareth and Lynette " "Lancelot »n£ p. " g °» Arthu V' "The Holy Grail," 
thur."-Browni4's"Cavalfer Tunes" "tTS a ? d T The Passin S of Ar- 
Brought the Good News from Ghent t^ V L ° St «£ eader ' How They 
Abroad," "Home Thoughts Trom the Sea -'"^ T H ? me Thou « h ^ '™m 
Camp," "Herve Riel " "PlJf,?;™ -a >. a U An In "dent of the French 
Villa-Down ^n the c'itv •» «TT?i P ?; d , e - s ' • M J Las ' Duchess," "Up a" a 
Pied Piper," S De Gustibus » »nH «t" i" E "8,land," "The Patriot," "The 
rab and P Rustum ' "The Forsaken Merma'n" P^^'---*?"* 1 '* "»<* 
tions from American Poetrv wtth » Me r™ an > and "Balder Dead."— Selec- 
Longfellow, WMttfer, and Holmes? PeC ' a ' a " entI ° n l ° Bryant ' Poe - ^ 

are 3 an E icTurare ry pronunciatTo h n Ttho^"^" 1 ?^ fa Elementary Latin 
simpler principles of syn ax the anllirvS t n °V edge ° f forms and the 
and the ability to write^fmple sentences hS'lhf' P1 "° Se at si « ht ' 
be secured by the thorough ™ a! t«, T Latin. Ihese attainments may 
ing of four books of Caesar™ Gallic War" ^"T' 3 ^. text-book, the read- 
selected authors including Caesar and hi-' • eq . ulvale . nt amount from 

P h°e Si s 0n - /£' - a f-aHo g n i aeS c ar m P o n s d tio^ STlS&.UZO^gV T^ 
the second book of Caesar's Gallic War. (2 units ) S °" 

studVitlnuTb^bfe'To tr?„slTt e e et port e ion e s qU rr mentS . ta Adva " Ced La «» a 
^neid, to show a fam°liari?v witl? th^ • of . C , 1Cer °> ?™ tio ™ and Virgil's 
and to translate a paVsage of connert^ F°' P rl ° f the Latin hexameter, 
These attainments may bf secured hv til g l^ Pr °f e based on Cicer ° 
orations and six books' oftheXm^ther^h T&££&ffi& 



36 University of Southern California 

.it;™ The examination in composition in 1919-1920 
£ rredrr'ration^or Arehias. (2 units.) 

.JVn S aZunt ye p;ose WO c; k mpo A sittn S tas^ o k n the Anabasis, one exere.se 
per week for a year. (1 unit.) 

(c) Third year's work. Komer's Iliad, Books I-VI. (unit.) 
7 . German. A knowledge of the inflections particles Star fy 
jectives, pronouns weak ve^s. and the usu ^1 strong ions> }th 

with the use of the modal auxiliaries and tne rincip les governing 

the simpler uses of the subjunct , and w such stories and plays 

order of words; and the ability to read _ a™ Prozess ," to translate easy 
| S „ghl\o lermaTto ^nsfatel^earPng, and to pronounce correctly. 



{2 8 Advanced German <^^^^^£^™£ 
man; the ability to re-tell an eP sode or sh art S y subjunctive m ode. 

and phrases in German ; familiarity »'» ^ forma tions of the passive 
especially in indirect discourse, and with we to mmatica l forms, 

voice, and a general strengthening of *^» w ^™idating from 500 to 
This knowledge may be attained *? fading ^ fa the form of q«»- 

600 pages of German, with much viva voc _ p lessons a week should 

rii'fto^^^ in — r and vocab ' 

Ul 7' fLTa knowledge of the essentials «£^'*££l£ 
inflections of nouns atfeW pronouns a»d -gul^and^ ^ 
ular verbs ; familiarity with the use ot tne p prono unce accurately, to 

elementary rules of syntax; and the »«'»L, such as About's "Le 
read smoothly, to translate .modem stores jmd .play.. de M p 

^\»teStt^td!,s*; and to translate easy English 



CHOI! , <-«-> taoaao*— -- 

into French. (2 units.) 



"^O^^dvancedTrench. A thoro h , , d of S^r^he ^ 
ing from nineteenth century authors of 500 to /«« P * rf „,„ re ference to 
i^%Tt^%oiS^r^r^^ one's self in ordmary 



S'ne/" SSSSfe. g-mSrand conversation. (2 un.ts^) 

J Grecian and Roman .H^HfiJ^^JSg i*- 

£# r^u^ir tla?s rrdU H c^oW note book work, and 

reports. (1 unit.) History Myer's "Medieval and modern 

14. Medieval and Modern Hfory My „. or an eaulva l e „t. 

gSilsLrXe^ce^ook --J^Cheyney, history of 
^Lo^^^S^-c-^^U U and report, (, 



The College of Liberal Arts 37 

17. Civil Government. Ashley's "American Government," or an equiv- 
alent. Reference work and class room discussion. The keeping of note- 
books is desirable. ( l / 2 unit.) 

18. Elementary Algebra. This should include the following subjects: 
The four fundamental operations with emphasis placed on the type-forms 
in multiplication and division; factoring; highest common factor, and low- 
est common multiple; fractions and fractional equations; simultaneous 
equations of the first degree ; the binomial theorem for a positive integral 
exponent; evolution; the theory of exponents; radicals; quadratic equa- 
tions; and the solution of problems involving the various classes of equa- 
tions. Emphasis should be placed on factoring and on the solution of 
equations. (1 unit.) 

19. Advanced Algebra. This should include the following subjects : 
Mathematical induction; the proof and the use of the remainder , and the 
factor theorems ; volution, including the extraction of any root of algebraic 
polynomials, and also of arithmetic numbers; the theory of exponents; 
complex numbers ; radicals and irrational equations ; the theory of quad- 
ratic equations; simultaneous quadratics; inequalities; ratio, proportion 
and variation ; arithmetic, geometric, and harmonic series ; logarithms ; per- 
mutations and combinations; limits and infinite series; the binomial 
theorem for any exponent; functionality and graphic representation; the 
theory of equations. Emphasis should be placed on the solution of equa- 
tions by factoring, and on the demonstration of laws and principles. (1 
unit.) 

20. Plane Geometry. This includes the usual theorems and problems 
of elementary plane geometry. An important part of the work should be 
the solution of original exercises, including problems in mensuration. (1 
unit.) 

21. Trigonometry and Solid Geometry. The development of the gen- * 
eral formulas of elementary plane trigonometry; the theory of logarithms 
and the use of logarithmic tables; and the numerical solution of plane tri- 
angles, and of simple problems in heights and distance. The fundamental 
propositions of solid geometry and especially those of spherical geometry. 
(1 unit.) 

22. Chemistry. Laboratory and text-book work for one school year. 
At least four hours per week throughout the year of actual laboratory 
practice is required to complete the amount of laboratory work desired 
(1 unit.) 

23. Physics. The equivalent of one year's work, including both lab- 
oratory and text-book work. Accurate notes of the laboratory work should 
be ?**«< ^? llllkan and Gale > "First Course in Physics," or Carhart's and 
Chute's "High School Physics" will serve to indicate the amount of text- 
book study required. (1 unit.) 

24. Botany. A study of types of plant groups, both in the laboratory 
And in the field. Drawings and notes made directly from the specimens 
must be submitted as evidence of the character of the work done. A full 
/ear's work. (1 unit.) 

25. Zoology. One year's work on the structure, relationship, and 
habits of animals. Laboratory notebooks with drawings will be required 
(1 unit.) 

26. Physiology. An equivalent of Hough and Sedgwick's "Human 
Mechanism." (1 unit.) 

27. Physical Geography. The study of one of the leading text-books, 
supplemented by at least forty exercises in individual laboratory work 
(1 unit.) 

28. Freehand Drawing. The study of light and shade and perspective, 
by drawing and shading with the pencil from geometric and simple life 
objects. (/ 2 to 1 unit.) 



38 University of Southern California 

ings. W to 1 unit.) 

,.. General Science The subject should be^re't ed f rom ^neral 
scientific standpoint rather *^" j r ° w V t L elenTnTary principles involved 

fntlXun^t^ - d V - i0US ^ 

ural phenomena. (1 unit.) . 

31. Social Science (1 unit), which may be made up from the fob 

"T?'„ • i ,„^ Tnifavtrtal History. This subject should include 

(a) Commercial and Industrial nunnj. act ivities of the western 

the development of the commercial ^ d~ta*«*nt « ffle The cQUr 
^^res^Xa fllWB E urope P from the economic stand- 
point. (^ to 1 unit.) > 

of man. (#s unit.) 

, . „ • 4 Vnnwledre of the fundamental principles of eco- 

(c) Economics. A J^l e *& ™ s \ s the divisio „ of labor, the factors 
nomic science, including such subjects as v international 

t 1ad P e r0d r g °o n od tTsh d ould d fo S rm PP th y ; ba^ of the P course. (tf unit.) 

(d) Sociology. A systematic study of the o «-^|f s ^ ^^Sj,^ 

a; 65 ' rw^xrw rS«f^ - iected readings 

assigned, and student exercises required. <J« unit.) _ 

• (e) Commercial Law. This : course should ^^fotmln^^. 

^^t^T??^^^ SS-* 5w in ordinary business 
transactions should be studied. 

, « ^- * r»„* +wn nr three units of well established 
"es IT^S^^ i„°L e credi°ed 0r hi*h e schools may be presented 



courses ~ 

among the electives. 



imong tne cictuvw. 



their note-books. 



THE UNDERGRADUATE ARTS COURSES 

The College offers regular undergrade courses With ma- 
Tears Sd lead! to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 



The College of Liberal Arts 39 

two hours of preparation or of subsequent reading per week 
or an equivalent amount of work in laboratory courses 

Lower Division courses are usually to be taken in the 
Freshman and Sophomore years and Upper Division courses 
f«r ?if t n '° r ^ ?- m ° r y , ears - Sixte en units per semester 

Sr2«V \™?t D / V1S T and fourteen f °r the Upper Division 
is considered full work. 

C l,?i? f0re i the u be - ginni r n§ i ° f , the S °P h omore year every student 
shall make choice of the department in which he desires to 
pursue his major course. His work will thereafter be under 
the direction of the professor who is at the head of that 
department. It is advisable that this choice be made as soon 
after matriculation as possible, so that the entire work of the 
student may be properly planned. 

Requirements for Degree of Bachelor of Arts 

th J^l f ° llow ; n # work must be completed in candidacy for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts: 

bv\e T ^ Q ^^°u eee Re( l uiremen ts. -To be completed 
by the end of the Sophomore year. 

English 1. One year; six units. 

Science. One year; eight or ten units. The science may be 
Chemistry, Physics, Botany, or Zoology. Y 

m F^ ig T ^. an ^ a ^ e 1 s - Two years; sixteen units. The language 
may be Latin Greek German, French, Spanish, or Italian If 

& t »i for entrance is continued > the «**~ L f 

Psychology. One year; six units. 

History, Economics, or English Bible. Eight units to be 
taken m any two of these subjects. 

Physical Education. Two years; two hours per week 

Military Drill Two years; four units. Required for all lower 
division men unless excused on account of physical disability. 

Red Cross Lectures. Two years; four units. Required for 
all lower division women. 4 r 

B. The requirements of the major department. 

C. A minor subject, approved by the major department. 
th?' Elective courses, to be selected by the student with 
2j^2?X^" Pr ° feSSOr ' SUffident t0 COmpkte the 

E. It is also required that thirty-six of the units comnleted 

coursfs JUm ° r "^ Seni ° r yearS Sha11 be in Upper Division 

Options, in the Professional Schools 

Law.— When 94 units, including all the general college re- 
crements and a minimum of 24 units in^the major depart- 
ment, have been completed in the College of Liberal Arts 
and of these not less than 32 have been tfken in the College 



40 University) of Southern California 

of Libera! Arts of this Unive &$&£%*& £?£ 

studies of the first : year of the Col lege ot £ satisfactory 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts upon consideration 
completion of two years in that coUeg !. r»p (indu ding 

should be given to the fo "°XIe oreferably Latin (at least 
Expression); a foreign language preteraoy ng _ 

two years if not covered by entrance crea; In stitutional 
lish and American), y^.*?"^?"^ Economics and 
and Constitutional; L°g'c, Phnosop ny^ should 

Sociology; and Pohucal f" e « ce - 1 g?^ # For a descrip- 
S?S?rS^^>SS^ clrse^ee under College 
of Law. 

Medicine.-When 94 units, i^f^^^SS *^ 
requirements and a minimum of -24 un s m the j ^ & 
ment, have been completed in the CoUee ^ p ician 

student may take the first year mm e ■> * f Badle lor of 
and Surgeons, and may receive the degr^ ee ^^ 

Arts upon the satisfactory ^ complex ion of t ^y^ ^ 
in that college. To thi i end tw q the , 

College of Liberal Arts are the s ame as ghould 

candidate for the degree of A.B except t ^ ^^ 

t^tf^^S'- a requirement of one 

year each of Physics and Chemistry. 

Pre-medical Course 

Two years of work in .he ^^J^^Xf,^ 
approved institution »" "|" "*" S '™K „,u.t be preceded 

fe&JFSE: S'det'ni^'tdSirfption see Coile.e o, 

Physicians and Surgeons. 

The Courses of Engineering 

The courses in the Department * *£^g*2££ 
neering, Electrical Engineering x ch ist are more ex- 
Mining Engineering and Industrial cne / described . T he 
tensively technical than the Arts co J. • their re gard 

courses therefore differ from »Je °« B ° ? H idity 

to the general I college ^^/.j hours assigned to 
of outline, and in the increaseu * . techn ; ca l courses lead 

the work of the various years These tec descri ti c f 

to the degree °f Bachelor of Science the d 

c h ourrer k see t0 a g r e t!cles X&^U^*** » ****** " 



the index. 



The College of Liberal Arts 41 

LIBRARY SCHOOL 

The Library School of the Los Angeles Public Library con- 
ducts a nine months' course of instruction in Library Science, 
for which fifteen units of upper or lower division credit may 
be secured toward the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Uni- 
versity of Southern California. 

The object of the school is to give well-rounded prepara- 
tion for library work. The curriculum includes lectures, class 
discussions and practice problems in the fundamentals of 
library technique, library administration, and bibliography. 
The Los Angeles Public Library system with its large collec- 
tion and well organized branches offers exceptional oppor- 
tunities for the supervised practical work which is a feature 
of the course. Regular students who wish to become school 
librarians or children's librarians are given the opportunity 
to specialize in these branches. A certificate is given those 
who complete the course with satisfactory standing. 

Classes commence in October. It is not possible to enter 
at any other time. 

Students are advised to take as much academic work as 
possible before entering the library school. Subjects which 
make the best foundation for library work are English, His- 
tory, Economics, Sociology and modern languages. 

A circular giving full information about the Library School 
may be obtained by addressing: Principal, Library School, 
Los Angeles Public Library. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students will be classed as Sophomores who have no en- 
trance conditions, and who have completed the first year 
work in Physical Education and thirty-two semester units of 
work, including the first year of the General College Require- 
ments, as stated above. 

Students will be admitted to the Upper Division and classed 
as Juniors who have completed sixty-four semester units of 
work in addition to the full requirements in Physical Educa- 
tion, and including all of the General College Requirements. 

Upper Division students will be classed as Seniors who 
have completed ninety-two semester units of work. 

Students in the Engineering Courses will be classified as 
Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors upon the basis of the com- 
pletion of at least nine-tenths of the work outlined for the 
various years. 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

On or before the appointed registration days in September 
and February, each student must register at" the Registrar's 
office, and must have entered upon a study card the subjects 
desired for the semester. 



42 University) of Southern California 

Lower Division students may register for as many as 
eighteen units and upper division students for as many as 
s Seen units. Upon petition to the Credentials Committee 
special permission may in certain cases be granted to carry 

e *No SS smdent may change his registration without presenting 
his reason on official blanks to the Registrar and securing 

hi Stad P en°ts a will not be given credit for work that is not re- 
corded in the Registrar's office. 

In the choice of subjects, all work necessary to remove 
conditions must be provided for first; and required subjects 
miiQt fake orecedence of elective subjects, 
"in order P that students may have careful consideration m 
selecting the subjects to be taken, the Registrar s office is 
kept "Sen throughout the year. Students are urged therefore 
£ present their credentials and complete their registration 
prior to the appointed registration days. 

ATTENDANCE, EXAMINATION AND GRADES 
Attendance upon all class and laboratory exercises indicated 
upon the enrollment card is required. Absences are counted 
from the day on which instruction begins All absences are 
reported to the office. If the number of absences exceed one 
in a one-unit course, three in a two-unit course, five in a 
Sree-untt course, seven in a four-unit course, or nine in a 
five-unit course, a condition will be recorded 

ReJuiar examinations are held at the close of each semester 
in AfttudiesThathave been pursued in the different classes 
At the end of the semester a report is issued by the office 
^ving the student's standing in each subject for the semester. 

Scholarship Grades are indicated by letters, as follows: 

A, B, C, D, passing grades. 

Con. Conditional, work not up to passing grade. 

Inc Incomplete, indicating that while the work done is of 

passing grade, certain portions remain uncompleted 
F. Failure. Credit can be given only upon repetition of the 

course. 

Grade points will be given as follows: A-4 points, B-3 

P 1r1he^ude P n^ 

such delinquency must be made up in such manner _ as the 
instructor may determine, within one year f rom the date 
thereof If the delinquency be not thus made up, the student 
may be required to take the subject again with a class, be- 
fore credit in said subject may be obtained. 

It is the effort of the faculty t 0>> so distribute grades "to 
approximate the "Biological law;" thus . , : is expected that 
average achievement will be represented by a C grade. 



The College of Liberal Arts 43 

Probation. A student receiving F or Con.; in one third 
or more of the work carried in any semester will be placed 
on probation upon registration. A second such failure, while 
on probation will result in dismissal. While on probation 
the student may not take part in any intercollegiate contest 
nor represent the University in any public manner, either 
as an individual or as a member of any organization. 

For special examinations a fee of two dollars is charged * 
Such are: 6 

1. Examinations for college entrance not taken at the 
regular times. 

2. Examinations for college credit on work for which 
special credentials can not be supplied. 

3. Examinations to make up mid-semester or final exami- 
nations whether the delinquency is caused by failure to pass 
or by absence. 

GRADUATION 

Requirements. Upon the completion of one hundred and 
twenty units including all the general college requirements 
and the satisfaction of the requirements in Physical Educa- 
tion and Military Drill, the student may be granted the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts, provided, that at least one academic 
year shall have been spent in residence in this college and 
that at least 240 grade points have been received. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering will be 
given upon the completion of the required courses in Engi- 
neering, provided that at least one academic year shall have 

,r; e n n H, S rH nt f m r Vi es 1 ldei ? c ; e in this college and that a satisfactory 
standard of scholarship shall have been maintained. 

Graduation with Honors.— Students may be graduated 
cum laude or magna cum laude under rules established by the 
Scholarship Committee. 

Engineering students may be graduated "with distinction" 
under rules established by the Committee on Engineering. 

Under no circumstances will either of these honors be con- 
ferred upon a student who has spent less than two full years 
in this University. 



tion* nTt^T 1 " 3 arC authori . zed to g^e such examinations only on presenta- 
tion of the Treasurers receipt for the fee in question. 



44 University of Southern California 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

In order to provide enlarged oPP-^^thSr mS 
° f T teaCh 1?18 A au£™Ued 9 th £ e JaSS a'school of Edu- 
'" J" ' Arte same time Dr Thomas B. Stowell was ap- 
pSnted &?UtoS3 to proceed with the orgamzat.on 

cSS.'WM SL* £n to issue *-— 

the Miscellaneous Typ ^t offe» SaSe. leading to the 
Ba^Lfo" S s e andthe U M n a V sreS y degrees ) with a major in educa- 
tion. PURPOSE 

The professional courses and the practice-teaching are 

quireme/ts for teachers' recommendatmnp^ 47) 

4 . Teachers who are preparing to engage 
"fTanamates who are preparing to teach in the upper 
grades and in intermediate schools. 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

GEORGE FINLEY BOVARD, A.M., D.D.. LL.D. 

UB President of the University . _ 

THOMAS BLANCHARD STOWELL, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D. 

1HU Dean of the School of Education 

JOHN HAROLD MONTGOMERY, M.S., E.E. 



Registrar 



Kegistrar 

HUGH CAR^JJLLET^ AM. uy ^ ^^^ 
HOWARD S IE p LUNT, AM., wi9) 

r <. f;i Fphniarv 1 1919, while in the military serv- 

*On leave of absence until February i, i?a?, 
ice of the United States. 



The College of Liberal Arts 45 

FACULTY 

The faculty is composed of the faculty of the Department 
of Education (College of Liberal Arts) together with heads 
of other departments concerned with the preparation of 
teachers for intermediate schools, secondary schools, and 
junior colleges. 

Professors in, the Department of Education 

THOMAS BLANCHARD STOWELL, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D. 

Dean, Professor of Education 
EDGAR HAROLD McMATH, A.M. 

Professor of Education 
FESTUS EDWARD OWEN, A.M. 

Professor of Psychology 
*HUGH CAREY WILLETT, A.M., 

Principal of High School and Supervisor of teaching Mathe- 
matics 
HOWARD LESLIE LUNT, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Education and Supervisor of teaching 

English and History 
CAROLYN ALCHIN 

Professor of Harmony and Ear-Training 
G. VERNON BENNETT, A.M., J.D. 

Lecturer 
ERNEST JAMESON LICKLEY, A.M., LL.M., J.D. 

Lecturer 

Professors in the College of Liberal Arts who give 
Courses in the School of Education 

PAUL ARNOLD, Ph.M. 

Professor of Mathematics 
CHESTER H. BOWERS, A.M., M.D. 

Lecturer, Medical Examiner of Men 
RUTH WENTWORTH BROWN, A.M. 

Professor of Latin 
EDNA AGNES COCKS, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education. Supervisor of 

Women's Gymnasium 
EDGAR MAXIMILLIAN von FINGERLIN, Ph.D. 
* T T T o~. T Professor of French and Italian Languages and Literatures 
ALLISON GAW, A.M., Ph. D. 

Professor of English 
JOHN GODFREY HILL, A.M., S.T.B., Ph.D. 

Professor of Religious Education 
TULLY CLEON KNOLES, A.M. 

Professor of History 
WILLIAM RALPH LA PORTE, A.M. 

ANDREW C P RfrMORV?Ft C l.M UCati0n ^ "^ ° f *' Gymnasi ™ 

Professor of Botany 
tARTHUR WICKES NYE, B.S., M.E. 

Professor of Physics 
LAWRENCE EDWIN RIDDLE, A.M. 

Professor of French 
ROY EDWIN SCHULTZ, A.B. 

Professor of Spanish 



tOn leave of absence, in special service of the United States. 



46 University of Southern California 

ALBERT BRENNUS ULREY, A.M. 

Professor of Zoology 
LEROY SAMUEL WEATHERBY, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 
ARTHUR CLASON WEATHERHEAD, A.M. 

Professor of Drawing 

Visiting Professors— Summer Session, 1918 
C. WARD CRAMPTON, M a D. Train . ng> ^ ^ ^ Schoo]s 

JULIA ETTIE CttANE ^ ^ Normal ^^ of Music , Pots . 

dam, N. Y. 
HAROLD WELLMAN FAIRBANKS, Ph.D. 
HAKU Supervisor of Geography, Berkeley City Schools 

ERNEST CARROLL MOORE, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D. 
^ President, Los Angeles State Normal School 

LOUISE STANLEY, A-M.^.D.^^ ^.^ q£ ^^ 

ADMISSION 
Group 1. Graduate Students 

^In'owe candidates seek exemption under *e State Board 
Regulations, they should present evidence of successful ex 
penence as teachers in accredited schools, (bee Hign scnooi 
Teachers' Recommendation.) 

Group 2. Undergraduate Students 

Hygiene, Sanitation, Logic, General Psychology, etc. 



The College of Liberal Arts 47 

THE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS' CERTIFICATE 

issu^ F- authoHzed to 

The law provides that the State Board of Education shall 
prescribe general rules under which county boards and city 
and county boards of education may grant regular certifi- 
cates of high school grade. These rules, together with the 
requirements of the University of Southern California, under 
which recommendations for such certificates are made, are 
summarized below. 

Group 1— Standard Group 

. 1. The bachelor's degree from a standard college requir- 

trfinhi * 61ght yeai " S ° f high Sch ° o1 and colle S e 

2 pne year (twenty-six units) of graduate work which 

?™!Ll n l- e ??* ful L - y f ar ' S COUrse in at least one subject 
( ma J°r subject) in which recommendation is sought. 
A Ihe satisfaction of the departmental requirements 
4 fifteen units in Education, which may be completed in 
either undergraduate or graduate standing, or the two com- 
bined. These courses must include: 

(a) School Management, 2 units. 

(b) Secondary Education, 2 units. 

(c) Practice Teaching, 4 units. 

(d) Teacher's Course in the major subject, 2 or 3 units. 

(e) Electives, 5 or 4 units. 

Group 2— Normal Graduate Group 

nth?r T J V ad , Ua i e XT ° f ^ Calif( ? rnia State N ° rmal School or 

other accepted Normal school. 

1. The bachelor's degree as in Group 1. 

2. One-half year (fourteen units) of graduate work. 

in Grou j 8 * 118 ^ 1011 of the departmental requirements, as 

4. Fiye units in Education, which must include 

(a) Secondary Education, 2 units. 

(b) Teachers' Course in major subjects, 3 units. 
Group 3— Experienced Teachers Group 

rei^ht m°nn C t^f da ^ S Wh ° ^ tEUght n0t leSS than ° ne y^ 
school 8) Wlth succes s m any elementary or secondary 

1. The bachelor's degree as in Group 1. 
i' Vu e year , of graduate work, as in Group 1. 
in Grmip 6 1 Satlsfactlon of the departmental requirements, as 

4. Eleven units in Education, which must include 
W Secondary Education, 2 units. 

(b) Teacher's Course in the major subject, 2 or 3 units. 
Electives, 7 or 6 units. 



48 University of Southern California 

B For candidates who have taught or been engaged in 
school supervision for not less than seventeen month 3 

1 The bachelor's degree as in Group 1. _ 

2 One-half year of graduate work, as in Group I. 

3. The satisfaction of the departmental requirements, as 
in group 1. 
Group 4— Special Normal Course Group 

that offers a special course for college graduates. 

1 The bachelor's degree as in Group 1. 

2 One-half year of graduate work, as in Group L 

3. The satisfaction of the departmental requirements, as 
in Group 1. . 9 

4 Five units in Education, as in Group t. 

5* One-half year (following or preceding the graduate 
study) in an approved Normal school. 
Group 5— Library School Group 

cially arranged for college graduates. 

1 The bachelor's degree as in Group 1. ._ 

2 One year of graduate study at the California State 

Li 5 rar Thf h satLfaction of the departmental . requirements 

cieutly high grade) ■»•«>'»« "Jl" c ^°,f d , te is fitted to 

™,tS d »?1hi^rofaS|3^p.-.-« sP eci- 

ned above. See Departmental Requirements. 

Exemptions from Requirements for the High School 
F Teachers' Recommendation 

1. Saccea.fal teaching expmea tee for «ol de» th» «« 
r„1^S hS) SreUVIX l ofeh«^ l eCetfihea.e, Group 



3-A. 



College of Liberal Arts 49 

2. Successful experience as teacher or school supervisor 
o°f r the fi ? P ^ tHan , Seve . nte , en » lont hs may be accepted' eu 
Certificat f e een G?oup g 3T aI ^^ Sm H * h Sch ° o1 Teache "' 

J cSSS? Gro^pT 1 Sch °° IS ' ^ High Sch ° o1 Teach " 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CERTIFICATE 

The regulations of the State Board of Education governing 
^^T^^T™ ° f COlkge ^duates^ay bf 
Group 1— For Inexperienced Teachers 

the" State' BSd""'" ^^ fr ° m * UniTenft * aCCredited by 
fol 2 lowIr dVe U " itS '" Peda ^°^ Prescribed by the Board, as 

a. Four units of practice teaching. 

b. Three units of principles of teaching. 

c. Five units of education, elective. 
Group 2— For Experienced Teachers 

1. The bachelor's degree as in 1. 

2. Ten months' successful experience in teaching. 
PERMITS TO TEACH IN INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS 

The regulations of the State Board of Education govern- 
ing permits to teach, in intermediate schools may be sum- 
marized as follows: y 

Group 1.— For candidates who are not graduates of Normal 
Schools, but who hold an Elementary Certificate 

A ,1; ^ t , le , a - St s ! xty se . m ester units in the College of Liberal 
Arts, including ten units of Pedagogy. 

Jtu* J el V Un r\ ea £ h ' in , any three ° f the following depart- 
mff p? nghS ^'c F - rench ' Spanish, Latin, History, Mathe- 
matics, Physical Science, Biological Science. 

(Candidates having twenty months of teaching experience 
are required to take only five units of Pedagogy.) pe " enCe 

Gr0 N P or 2 n7af °s r cho^s didateS ^ ^ gfaduateS ° f ™ r ™« 

1. At least thirty semester units in College of Liberal Arts 

™l* ng T7 te V mtS T- each , in any two of the following depart- 
2 p E"gl»h French Spanish, Latin, History g Mathe- 
matics, Physical Science, Biological Science. 



50 University of Southern California 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

THOMAS B. STOWELL and EDGAR H. McMATH, Professor, 

HOWARD L. LUNT, Associate Professor 

ELIZABETH YODER, Assistant Professor 

CAROLYN ALCHIN, Assistant Professor 

101 and 102. Fundamental Psychology. See Psychology 1 
and 104. Six hours; two semesters. 

mi Princinles of Education (including General Method). 

(Stowell.) 

units! first semester. (McMath.) 

ence. Two units; second semester. Saturdays. 

11? Tnteroretation and Expression. Methods in the inter- 
piStt^ the pVbo^ of tre P-s S oral 

vo^t^^^ 

Irs' certificate. Two umts; first semester. ( Yod ^O 

114 Principles of Sociology. See Sociology 100. Three 
units; first semester. (Bogardus.) 

120 Americanization and Immigration See Sociology 
03 Two units; second semester. (Bogardus.) 

191 Religious Education. See Religious Education 12U, 
i2 l Two u g r s ; Throughout the year. (Montgomery. 

123. High School ^.JjS^rS 
high school; the arrangement of the curriculum, 
units; first semester. (McMath.) 



103. 

12 

121. 



The College of Liberal Arts 51 

ySSr Scs firsts 

tendents. Two units; second semester. (McMath ) 

134. Recent movements in Education A cfuriv ~t 
out the ye„. 8 4 „„", (Sky ) "° n C °°' se ""»"»*- 



5 2 University of Southern California 

138 . juvenile Delinquency The causes , of J&Sggi 
the juvenile courts; probation, .etc. An 

not offered 1918-19. 2 umfs. (Lickley.) 

139 . Educational P^ogv (S ee Psych o togyj l£ The 

s^flS«i^5SriV ,d! moral educat,on - 

Three hours; first semester. (Owen.) 

140 Harmony. Summer Session. 2 units (Alchm.) 

141. Advanced Harmony. Summer Session. 2 units. 

(Alchin.) . 

,«. Tom ftinttag and •" "JS m ^f Sf'bXSfloiic 

S'KSfS-' VSS&IS-Tton*. 4,5. 2 

units (Alchin.) 

,„. Public ^tltcaSTS-aPpi?^ ScS 

mer Session. 2 units. (Crane.j 

Graduate Courses 

200. Philosophy ^'^^'feinfi 

educational, theory t A «f/^ffi °n possible and desirable. 
psychicactmt.es that make e^ucafaoP un . t first semester . 

Prerequisites— Courses ivi iw, 

tion; its assumptions; its place in n character- 

s^^^^^ Three umts; 

second semester. (Stowell.) H - h School , 

202. Practice in Teaching The • Umve«it rig g 

located on the Un^ers.ty Oampus urmshes '^ d 

for observation and *¥££?£ Secondary Education. F.ve 

giving instruction to classes in 

hours; one semester. . 

203 Secondary Education, ^-.e — tje 
origin, growth or^n^o^admm»^t»n, «op t fa 

jSurtomleftne^dTof candidates for the high school 
certificate. Two units; Saturday. 

istration, orgaf^S schools, including elementary, 

s»4 I S»»»' te st * Two 

units; second semester. (McMatn.; 



The College of Liberal Arts 53 

tin 2 ,? 5 * T^ h ° 01 S " rv 7 s - A cour se in city school administra- 

sa ? T v eVr^Ll; a tr s r e^°l„r t L y „ s s w o^ h b e e sg£ 
a a cSssss? administrati °«- t - -itsj = 

206. Statistical Methods. The functions of averages 
laws of dispersion, coefficients, graphs, etc. A text-book 
course with problems. Two units; first semester. (McMath) 

207. Seminar. Topics changed from year to year Ad- 
mission only on consultation with the department. ' Two 

f.iV" d - ergradUate Maj ° r Work - Thirt y semester units The 
08 Z m ^ COm T 3re re <3" ired: 102, 103, 104 or 123, 105, 106, 
108 or 108a, and one teachers' course; others elective. 

Requirements for the degree of Master of Arts, Major in 

ca^n nd unit^^ 10 " 'V^ ""graduate ma/or in ed " 

loTor 2 ( 3 1° SX&fc E^tf&'T&S?* ^ 

TEACHERS' COURSES IN THE VARIOUS 
DEPARTMENTS 

Special Teachers' Courses in Methods are offered by the 
professors in the several departments. These courses are 
TheTa/e <"?*«*«« Jor the <^™' recommendation 
I hey are purely professional courses and may be credited 
for three semester units toward the required Vteen un ts 
Far y thJ 9 e T T^? tOWard the de S ree of Ma «ter of Arts! 

Dartmeni^ ea f h n rS C ° UrSeS in Education s « the several de* 
partments as follows: 

1. Teachers' Course in Botany— Botany 106. The place of 
mme n t y he ,n J eC ,° nda t r f: Educatio "; the principles that deter- 
ma^rLl f e /, ectl ° n ' the organization and the use of botanical 
material; laboratory experiments. Two units; first semester! 

2 Teachers' Course in Chemistry— Chemistry 217 A 
S&l? C^unr 1 ° f ***** ***** '-Se^ndart 

oA«5tc^ 

draw.ng m Secondary Schools. One unit; first semester g 

th? - „ Te K aCherS ' C °u rS , e in En g»sh-English 295. A study of 
,nL P - % bl ? mS ' methods ' materials, and bibliography. Three 
units; first semester. H J cc 

5. Teachers' Course in French— French 111. The methods 
SniKcSS! SmesLr 86 » ^^^ classed 



54 UmersitS of Southern California 

in Secondary Schools. Two units. 



S^clTs^s^Two units; both semesters. 

9 . Teachers' Course ***£t£^I*. ^boHf 

ts^^^^^^J^- to w Sch0Gl 

classes Two units; second semester. 

10 . Teachers' Course .in *£^r§l& ol ^ r .?ta 
methods of presenting the four-yea ttig 
Spanish. Three units; second semester. 

schools. Two units; first semester. 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 
To meet the demands of those seeking the qualifications of 

HKSSfSSSfc 



offered 



orrereu. * 

1 The Pentateuch (Religious Education 1)J units . 
Prophetic and Chronicle Books of the 01dT|Stamen^ ^ 

r> 2 units 3. The Bible as Literature, (.K. u- o;> . 

T^ Aptotic Age of the New Testamem RE CO, 2.un 
5. The Gospel History of the IN ew BibUcal Prin ciples 

?R Un r-5) 6 2 un^'rTh^gtiX Bible in Practical Use 
R. I 13), 2 U unit S s. 8. The Teach ngs of {««»<**; "{J. 
2 units. 9. Religious P eda S^J R ch * rc r R E. 121), 2 
The Modern Organiser i of the C ™; c £ \ hroughout the 
units. U. Social Ethics (R. E. 141), ,<t \vn , 3 ^^ 

year. 12. The Psychology of K" 1 ^ " £;Sr E . 200). 14. 
\t Seminar, 1 unit, throughout the year^ (K ^ ^^ 
Seminar, 2 units throughout the year (*• *<• 



courses elective. 



courses cio-nw. 

A full description of these courses will be found under the 
Department of P Religious Education. 



The College of Liberal Arts 55 

DE f££S? ENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGH 
SCHOOL TEACHERS' RECOMMENDATION 

strfen)" deSCri P tio " of courses see "Departments of In- 

the^r^ ?"^ Bota^T and^" 7 ' 4 ^ ^^nt 
Plant Physiology 3 J„Sh™ J a f °T my ' 3 units > W4. 
nomic Botany, l^units or 105 a pftp ^ ^ 10S - Eco " 
ics, 2 units; 106 Teachers'' r- Pr oP a gation and Genet- 
Anatomy and Histolotv I Lif SC W 2 - Units; 107 - Pla "t 

lz£i te" 001 4"-' 21"' £™rs ss 

course, 1 unit; one advanced analytical course leacners 

pSles: n 2 D u r nT; ng brawini n r UmentaI ¥™ in S> 2 **.; 
Drawing, 2 un1"s TechnTc nf n° m ^'o 2 Units '- Machi "e 
4 units; Architecture 2 nnitf ^ ra . wln ^ 2 units; Geometry, 

thenar;? MoTylnd Bankm™^ 168 ' V"* 8 ' th -^hout 
3 units; ioi. Mun^S^bSSS 3Z & V**" i Fi " ance > 
lems, 3 units- 104 fn™!..' ' o ts; 102 - Labor p rob- 
tion, 2 units or 106 Com™ '°? S , £ Unit ? ; 105 - Transporta- 
Business AdriJS&tS?"?^ ST"*"*? 11 ' 2 T tS; 107 - 
t'ory of Economic Thought 2 nW ,u Senlmar; 20L His " 
102. Recent Economic Then™ ? throughout the year, or 
and 6 units to be ^^&??£™£r *« ^ 

Major in Education. Thirty unit* in tt a 
courses including 103 104 or 121 in^ 10^ ^ Undergraduate 

ranged. e ° f the tea chers' courses to be ar- 

cou!t r (30\n?") g toLwe1i n b; n a der ^ aduate f En ^ lish ™Jor 
units in the Engli h department *" T 1 "" ° f dght graduate 
courses 20, 110 112 a nS , C ° Urse must inc,u de 

149), 197, and 295 and the "Fn^T 6 / 8 , 66 COUrses 121 to 
graduates." e En S lls h final examinations for 



56 University of Southern California 

Major in French. The required I undj Jgraduate^ajor (30 

gJLPSZJttt'lZSL wrS examination in French 

ly'ntax and French pronunciation. 

Major in History. Six units each c* ^^^^ 

Major in Latin. V&^^jg.^ZSf* 
ing Latin 3, Cicero and Livy, 3 units * prQSe C ornposi- 

units; 5. Latin Syntax 2 umts,b. Composite, 1 

tion, 2 units; 115. Advanced £ Latin Literature> 2 

unit, two semesters 120 J«t° y ^ the depart . 

S& , " g T r eSrsOs?2 b units, first semester. 

Major in Mathetnatic, Courses 1-7, 108, 112, 209 210 

^ on 21 105 114, 116, 206 

Major in Physics. ^^VMathematics including the 
^Teachers' Course): Courses >£» f which co nsult the 
calculus; certain courses in Chemistry, 
department. . ,_„._, 

Major in Sociology. The -^^ 
(30 units); seven ^^ l ^&^li£ 103, 104 or 112, 
include Economics 1, Sociology i, 

200 or 201, 205 or 206. 

. n . u Tiiirtv semester units, including courses 

.Or^US^nf^TT^erTcourse). 

Major in Zoology. 1: General [Zoology, ^gSagSfe 
out the year; 2. Physiology, 3 u "ts, iw. 7 Vertebrates, 3 

h s 2 ^^^PKSS^y.- 21 °- Special 

"Zoology^ unit°s; 211. Teachers' Course. 

SPECIAL SECONDARY SCHOOL CERTIFICATES 
The retirements ^^^bSSIG 10 orlne 

S rTwo C yir;60rtsVrc^mic wor k in the College 
of Liberal Arts. forty-eight (48) 

j„ sssres. ssrs&. -ttu - — - 

Special Certificate is sought. 

3 Six units (6) in General Pedagogy. 

4 Four units (4) in Practice Te r aching \ Methods) 

5 Two units (2) in Teachers' Course (Methods). 



The College of Liberal Arts 57 

Substitutes or Equivalents- 

sfi?med y for' S h a S l7nf S t\ fUl ex P^ rie " ce j» teaching may be sub- 
vears' l.rr.clf . C - re 1 uired Pedagogical work; and two 

HrfnJo • ^ ex P« nence m ay be substituted for the en- 
tire pedagogical requirement. 

•l he University of Southern California is authorized to 
issue special certificates in the following subjects 

1. Manual and Fine Arts Type-Mechanical Drawing 

2. Miscellaneous Type-Oral and Dramatic Expression 

3. Physical Culture Type-Physical Education and Train- 
n n a g sdcf! a 6ad a e n t d Drui ygr ° Und M ^^^ Athletics; gm- 
En g inIer C in n g iCal **" ^H*- Meetriod Engineering; Civil 

5. Music Type— Public School Music. 
I. DIVISION OF MANUAL AND FINE ARTS TYPE 

The work aims primarily to prepare teachers and suoer- 
irn S da°r f ySo a .s. ,Cal ***"*** * the intermediate 'and '"he 

in J h mr, qUired ^ Ur o eS in - Drawi "g are: Instrumental Draw- 
ing (Drawing 1), 2 units; the Mechanical Principles of 
fl" h ? a " d ? Dr awing (Art 1), 2 units; Drawing from the Cas 
(Art 2), 2 units; Machine Drawing (Drawing 4) 2 units the 
£v mr° a f ? raw ' n & ( Dr awing S), 2 units; Descriptive Geom! 
etry (Drawing 6), 4 units; Architectural Drawing ( Draw 
ing 3), 4 units; Elements of Architecture (Architfcture T 
2 units; Shades and Shadows (Drawing 8) 2 uni ts Annli.H 
Perspective (Drawing 9), 2 units; Machine Design (S w 
T? a ,P' ? r UmtS; C^ Statics (Drawing 1W) 1 unk- 

II. DIVISION OF MISCELLANEOUS TYPE 

ORAL AND DRAMATIC EXPRESSION 

nrlS e ;„ W ° rk a ^ S pril ? aH !y to prepare teachers of Oral En- 
non nrnf •° nd f ry Sch °° Is and J unior colleges. All of the 
non-professional courses are cultural and give efficiency in 

are o^T^ °a- lkerature - The professional courses 
ntL? P u t0 , u PPer division and graduate students and to 
rege e woTk ^^ P3SSed the ^-valent of two years of col- 

Courses in Oral Expression and Dramatics ffor full in 
formation see Bulletin, College of Oratory) ( Ul ' '"" 

Fundamental Technique of Reading (Oratory la) 6 nnit.- 
nWand D.ction (Oratory 2), 4 Inits; Speech and A^ 

cha;je h d eSe sr r ^,e r n q „ U, ; f e Cot1 d e U o1 £££" * ^'^ ""* ^™ » 



58 University of Southern California 

tion (Oratory 3), 4 units; *Story Telling (Oratory 4) 4 
units; Public Speaking P^y^J^B^ 
Dramatics (Oratory 6) 2 units ^ av * nce 101), 8 units; 

100), 4 units; Art of Interpret /^ridgment (Oratory 

units 

III DIVISION OF PHYSICAL CULTURE TYPE 

Those desiring certification ^ ^g 1 ,, »fgS^S 
complete the state retirements , ag te *£ Mg*^ and 
of academic study (forty-five rPn uirements in Education, in- 

Sid 15, consists of the following courses. 

General Gymnastics, 4 units; Advan^ gm^cs, J 
units; Outdoor Sports ,2 un ^ s0 P ^f c ^ e ne, 2 units; San- 
Physical .Education 2 .^;J r ^'unta; First Aid to the 
itary Science, 2 units • ™y"oio& ^ . 2 units; Anatomy, 
Injured, 2 units; Elementary t oik ^ts- Secondary Methods, 
3 units; Elementary Methods ,2 ^g; | e ^ d d Adnlinist ra- 
2 units; Theory of Play, 2 units, r >8 . Kinesiology, 
funits •tnthr^melTand IhyS' Examination, 2 units; 
Massage and Orthopedic Gymnastics, 2 units; 

Majors should also -take » ^^.fr^t^fpgJ 

K& s? b jer^ed f ^rVertfficite may be selected 

from the following: 

Physical Education Playground and Gymnastk Games 

(P. E. 20), 2 units; Advanced Folk Uancin ir. 

units; Recreation and Religion (P. E. 102), 2 units. 
Military Science. Military Science and Tactics, 4 units 
Education. Principles of E^carion (Education 103)^3 

units; Principles of Secondary Education ^d.^u; 

History of Education-Anoent (Ed. 105 2 u ^ a _ 

? f E ft^^°St n 8- ( lSe^ten?nd Expression (Ed. 
12) funisfHigh School Problems (Ed. 123), 5 units. 



rhe College of Liberal Arts 59 

units } ' tS; Blon °mics (Biol. 104), 4 

,,n£ heI ^ i f t^y • Gen eral Inorganic Chemistry (Chem 1) 5 
units; Elementary Organic, Food and Textiles' 5 units 

Physics. General Elementary Physics, 10 units 

i^s^sa a*s&s .Li 20 '- 2 

IV. DIVISION OF TECHNICAL ARTS TYPE 

The departmental requirements for the certification of 
a e s a fo h llo S ws°: f ^^ SUbJCCtS ° f the Teehnical Trlf T^ are 

I. Major in Civil Engineering. 

Prerequisites: 

Mathematics 4 5, 6, 7, 108-15 units; Physics $, 4, 
Civh 7 Fn 8 guTeering D . raWmg "' "' ^ ™^ 

fnrfc"! ( fo4 E -in'^* 3 > i2 - nnii l> RaiIroad Su -ey- 
(C E l67 \ \ 4 u " lts ; Analytic Mechanics 
Stresses ??' F m?% Gra P hic Statics, 1 unit; 
fCF lih -! 16 V 3 I 1 " 115 '' Structural Design 
(U E. 118), 4 units; Teachers' Course, 2 units. 

II. Major in Electrical Engineering. 

Prerequisites: 

General Physics— not less than 10 units- Mathe- 
matics, including Integral Calculus; Mechanical 
Drawing, 1 U n,t; General Chemistry-at leas 1 
elementary course; Courses in Electrical Engineer- 
ing, Dynamo Electric Machinery (E E 101a? S 
units; Dynamo Electric Machinery (E E 101b ci 
5 units; Dynamo Laboratory (E. E 102) 2 unit,- 

^aX^Sre^TE 8 f ^^ & 

(E E 109) 2 ,Sc ^ nitS; . E1 . ectric Railroads 
Equipment e"" ubj^STMlF Stad ° n 
mg (107-8)/ 10 units%Vs? S '(105 V ' lyrical 
Measurements, 2 units; Physics 112. Pho ometrv 
try \ n Zr U ° n ' 3 UnitS; PhysicS "* PhoTotl 



60 VfbmHs of Southern California 

V DIVISION OF MUSIC TYPE 
The trance retirement, .« W ^^f* *&£ 

ci e„, in P^Pl^Xg? Deldency incite rudiment, of 
S'tVbetacSTdurin? th. «... term. 



%"": ,' 8 nni, Method, .an. ^ffcl"^^ 
"C,' C sit. y T„ 2 ni| "4 ce Teaenin, . uni«i g-J 

tive, 2 units. 

THE UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 

with the School of Education. its 

The immediate aim of the High School is t p v ^ 
students for entrance to {^g a liberal high 
V Tool-edStio C n r ?o C r 1 roW h0 srud V e e nts P who may not be able 
S h ld d SS? institutions of learning 
ta *S£eSff S^ - - d H^ School Teacher, 
recommendation. c-^ool see the announce- 

For a full description of the High School see 
me F n°t o'n last pages of this Year Book. 

TEACHERS' APPOINTMENT REGISTRY 

• i TWhers' Appointment Registry was 
In 1917, a special. Teachers APP fg m r . 

opened in the Administration Og^° Q ^ rs in co mmunica- 

ing employment, and to P ut J^noo teachers. The purpose 

tion with trained and ^P" 16 ""^^ information as will 

is to secure and to keep .on Me such i rson for 

enable, the Umvers.^ to name Ae best ^ should be e x- 

i& in SffS-w*Ss5*ffi ££ 3SU to & 

^^?-t^ ? ^ sll ^ ,ti,,le when the engage " 

merit begins. 



The College of Liberal Arts 61 

Prompt attention will be given to such inquiries. No corn- 
er the n schooI *" thlS Servke fr ° m dther ^ candidal 

Address: Appointment Secretary, College of Liberal Arts 
University of Southern California, Los Angeles Cal 

THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

ORGANIZATION 

ni T <lt £ r adua ^ Department of the College of Liberal Arts 
of the University of Southern California was formally organ- 
ized during the year 1910-11. General oversight of the De- 
partment is intrusted to the Graduate Counfil, which is a 
dlnf n f ff ^° m T I V ,t - tee a PP° inted fr °m the faculty by the Presi- 
dent of the University. The administrative officers of the 

we" D hS?"^ "f Thomas T B - Stowell, Chairman; Root 
well D. Hunt, Secretary, and J. H. Montgomery Registrar 
who may be called upon for information !nd advice ' 

PURPOSE 

.It is the purpose of the Graduate Department- (1) To 
Sla h U ^ Pr ^'- nenCe t0 graduate curses of in struct on of- 
Z^^f-^Y^'^ to insure systematic and efficient 
administration of this advanced work; (3) to provide seoarate 
instruction for graduate and upper division students * 

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 

of T th C e faculty* C ° UnCil C ° nSiStS ° f the followin S members 

GEORGE FINLEY BOVARD, D.D., LL D 
President of the University 
THOMAS B. STOWELL, Ph.D., LL.D., Chairman 
ROCKWELL D. HUNT, Ph.D., Secretary 
J. H. MONTGOMERY, M.S., E.E Registrar 
PAUL ARNOLD, Ph M 4-jTr r v r ™T ZJ 

EMORY S. BOGARDUS Ph n Z¥.r a I £ ^?, LES - AM - 

JAMES M. DIXON LH'D foHN r M Hnf A i\ A ' M - 

RAI^H r£^ilif£ Ph - D - ROY N MA-L?0 L M L ' 8j? 

AM STB ^n ING ' FESTUS E. OWEN, AM. 

ALLtSON^AW^D. g^. St^R?^ "&£ 

It is the function of the Graduate Council- m t„ 'a r ' ' 
cond,,, ons o( adn ,i ssion lo the G ™^°*nrt. O) To Jn„« 

to establish and to maintain the requirements for all d-i-Th,,*?; 
degrees; (5) to formulate regulations fo? the etectiv!or S Tnt 
zation and administration of the Graduate Department 



62 University of Southern California 

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 
Admission to the Graduate Department of the College of 
Liberal Arts is granted to Spates o ^.s CoHe 
graduates of other ^»/ e ff/ s ^ fa Xy evidence of character 
n zed standing who present satis ^ cl "/^ 1litable age and satis- 
and qualifications Other persons of stable age ^ ^ 

factory attainment may be admitted jotne Adrn i ss ion 

graduate courses upon approval by the ^ ^ neces . 
to the courses of the graduate U *V* o-raduate degree, 

sarily ^'g"-^ ^i. widi^" unit, "of the 
An undergraduate stuaem , ... th approval of 

Bachelor's degree may be Permitted . ^^ to toke grad- 
the Graduate Council and . th « ™* J ° r P~rrylng more than 12 
uate courses, provided that he \e °ot carrymg 
units of undergraduate work. Such a student my * 
for only sufficient graduate work to bring the t must 

of units carried to fifteen. In all such cases^ a i 

are entered as "already completed in u Depart- 

The steps required for admission to the graduate v 
ment are: 1. Consultation with the » ot depa rtment 
uate Council; 2. Consultation with the head oi^tne P 
in which the student «^X Gradate Councillor such further 
ance in person before the Graduat p e n >'°^ visabIe A t the time 
interrogation as that body may de e £ advisable, A 
of making application the student £° u £ f^ nt (2) certified 
rials, including (1 his ; ^»/«fnetiXn. previously at- 
transcripts from the rec ,° r ,^ o ." rses wit h the r unit-values 
tended, listing all his preceding. = ou " es wlt ^ d in the case of 
and the grades attained in each cours , and in ^ 

applicants seeking a high schoo teacher _s cr > teaching 

tificates testifying to the , qual it, ^ any prevw ^^ 

experience and the nurnber^f month durij^ ^ ^ 
experience continued ^u^Us b ° the University as mat- 
classes above specified are retained dj jn immediately a t 
ters of Pf manent /^° r ^ ni ; can t. e s y s eeking admission, regis- 
5^ ? S*r^dS?1?^^ ^-talSU Pending their 

presentation. ^ qraduate STUDY 

The Severalty is at present offering graduate courses in 

the following subjects: . - n n Riolosrv (animal), 

Applied Mathema^s .&n* neenng) E ^f ion , English, 

Biology (plant), Uemistry,^ Oriental Studies, 

t-j 4.:^ onrl c; nr iolo2fv. 



rniiu&upnj, ***jw- r -,.- 
Education and Sociology. 



The College of Liberal Arts 63 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS 

mmmmsm 

candidate no righf?o the de£j h£ f^ "^ 8 " P f °? the 

other i/stitSsTre accepted af Sft n° Ur ? eS ^ at 

institutions are £S£g'5S£ i S ^ su a bi e ec C t t U o rS the fr0m H^ ther 

of study "in residence" as hereafter prescribed [ He C ° ndltlons 

Each candidate for the degree of Master „( i,t * i. 

In .his co„„ec,f„ n „ Ce ,he'T,™'. £",*£„??■ SloT? *?"' 

inTwrUn?;eSt y W ini\ a Lin 0t h ?reVi ^ Sly d ° ne ^ raduate w -k 
admission "to the Grlduatf n^ 7* lst /t tlon by *wW"g for 
indicated. He wiH the stS^T"* by ^ m ? th ° d above 
wishes to pursue which ro,,r«.? T* 6 °- f Study which he 

or "major-^subTect closely re a e te ™ U t S T™ -° f * # ncipal 
h is undergraduate rn,,rcJ re ' ated to the major subject of 

"minor" sfbjecTsltSor ,"/ rerated^toThe^maT^"^^- ^ 
and^quiring not more than ^hSf the dme^ven^ T* 

mendation" for the High School TelcW, r ?' & / ent ' A " minor recom " 
the student receives hfs major reco^endp^nn 1 ^ ^ ^ granted when 
units of work in the minor Lbfec^o^kT 9 ^ G haS *? ad at least six 
for the degree of Master of Arts m„S 7 Sophomore grade. A "minor" 
standard. 0t Arts must consist wholly of work of graduate 



64 



University of Southern California 



The details of his ^£^7^^^^ 
upon consultation with the head ot i v ^ ck{ng th 

^ai eS of t0 thne P arental SB will he credited toward 

'VptrTof the eourse ^^f^S^StAt 

thesis or dissertation embodying the ^u . g nQt 

gation on some subject in the ma or w fa u be a 

fhe intention of the Graduate Conned that tn ^^ 

piece of highly recondite research s U cn as must 

dacy for the degree of D °ctor of Ph Uosop y d 

be a serious, considerable, and printeWep his thorough 

strating the writer's power of original tn g , ^ 

grasp of the subject matter mvolved ana 

fenAis material in a schol 1 manner and sty ^ 

of this essay must be Presented xor py fa in whlch 

Cou^lnotUte^.^^^g^e bibliography must 
the degree is sought, a^ iajxiy c op completed 

be similarly Presented a month later lation9 fur- 

thesis, conforming in detail to- «> P™ s the Gra duate 

nished by.the University must be sub^ t o 

£ U c2e S of ^^ ffl^^Jr^Sftt of 

&S& & Sst\f /an^rand ^Saturday in April. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER'S CERTIFICATE 

Candidates for the *&S^^^£££°*£ 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

Lower Division courses are given numbers from 1 to 99; Upper 
Dtvuton courses 100 to 199; Graduate courses, 200 to 299 Ordin- 

^JrfeZ% S eT ld "" °*'> ""« " rti ***** - ^ 

nfSr"" *V rk ' d " throu /. hout th * y™r" are continuous courses 
and cannot be commenced in the second semester. 

AGRICULTURE 

in The couftS^a^! 6 ^^ •**«**"" « ^ 

1. Mineral Composition of Soils. A study of the more im- 
gITLT't 1 *- L .f or ^^y recitations 2nd lectures S^e 
Geology 2. Two units, throughout the year. (Bailey.) 

2. Field Botany and Taxonomy. The habitats nollina 
t.on and relationship of plants. See Botany 2 Three units 
either semester. (Life.) units, 

of 3 soil E wl?fr y *„J h - e relat ^° n ° f plantS to their environment 
ot soil, water, physiography, etc. See Botany 3. Two units 
second semester. units, 

4. Plant Physiology. See Botany 104. Three units- 
throughout the year. (Life.) ' 

™!v A S ricul t ural Geology. Lectures on the origin com- 
Zn T,' ClaSS f ' ficat, ° n J and nami "S ^ soils; controf of aera- 

unitsr^th^rsenrester^'Shetr^ 1 ""^ ° f ^ ^ 

££45 B SS oteXcroWagt s^htTen? 
nrsTs^S.^Bayy? 1 ^ ° f S °' ls ' ferti '- s - Two'^ 
e itl 10 f Econo , mic Botany. This course deals with the para- 
«nlL^ifhe a 1enitt I er eC0 ?S C ) PhaSeS -. See ^^ ^ T " 
J": , PIan f t Propagation and Genetics. A study of the 
P e r c n o C nd P, rem1s P er nt fUFT^ ^ *"•"* ^ T ™ ^ 

em^olo^H 010 ,^ To? ge ^ eral P ro blems of comparative 
tRittPni gY ' Zool °^. 10S - T "ree units; second semester 
(Rittenhouse and assistants.) ' 



66 University of Southern California 

122. Economic Entomology. Orchard, field, crop and gar- 
den insect pests, the forest : insects ^A Jgg^jgS 

second semester. (Rittenhouse.) 

123 Parasitology. The organization, life history, and evo- 

Zoolo-y 100. Two units; first semester. (Ulrey.; 

Physical Chemistry. Chen, 109. l^fy*^^***' ™- 

Mechanical Drawing. Draw. .1. Shop Work. Physics 21. 

Architectural Drawing. Arch ,3. ^ Sociology. Sociol. 118. 

Surveying. Civil En g. 1,2, and 1 J. Labor Problems. Econ. 102. 
Hydraulics. Civil Eng. 109. 

ART 

W L JUDSON, A. C. WEATHERHEAD, Professors 

ALMA MAY COOK, Lecturer 

MARIAN SPRUNK, CAROLINE M, WOOD, Instructors 

unit; throughout the year. (Sprunk.) 

„* A,-* A hrief seneral course tracing tne 

ciation 1918-19. ™rpmiisite to all other 

/Note-Art 1 or its equivalent is in general a prereqaisite 

courses in Art. 



The College of Liberal Arts 67 

15. Interior Decoration. A practical course in the prin- 
ciples of form and their relation to the decorative idea A 
course where a person will be able to express his individual 
ideas with confidence in a simple, direct manner in terms of 
color, form, line and texture. Historical periods are studied 
only as they show the development of the modern home and 
its furnishings This course is accredited as one year pro- 

n«™ ^°f k fadings are assigned throughout the 
course. Six hours laboratory work weekly. (Wood.) 

16. Applied Design. Color and its modifications and the 
" n 2' eS ? f d £ sign . ar , e stu ,4 ied a "d direct application made 

on material. Essential qualities of the decoration of differ- 
ent periods in various countries is illustrated by photographs 
embroideries, rugs, tapestries and pottery. Readings as- 
signed, f-our hours laboratory work weekly. (Wood.) 

18. Art Appreciation. A non-technical course of illustrated 
lectures and gallery tours to acquaint the student with the 
fundamental principles, historical and modern, governing 
the various forms of art. The history of the development of 
art and architecture is studied. One Saturday afternoon each 

SnV S T eV °^ ed ^ V1 - Sh ? t0 Study architecture and to local 
studios. Local and visiting artists address the class. Ex- 
hibits m Exposition Park Art Gallery are visited for study 
yeaf'Jcook.) SCul P ture " Two ""its. Throughout the 
BIOLOGY 

ALBERT B. ULREY (Zoology), ANDREW C. LIFE (Botany) 

SAMUEL RITTENHOUSE (Zoology) Professors 

™ A ^ CATHERINE V - BEERS < Zwl °gy), Assistant Professor 

FRANK S. DAGGETT (Animal Distribution), L. E. WYMAN (Animal 

Ecology), Lecturers 

GERTRUDE LYNCH (Zoology), Research Assistant 

GEORGE W. GARNER, SARAH BURTON (Zoology) Assistants 

GERTRUDE LYNCH DUNN, EILEEN CARTER, DoIoTHY SKILES 

(Botany), Assistants 

Bo, , a fi n C y "'an h JfoM0 O 4 OlOS> ' '' ™' G "«"" B '°'°«* '«•" 

inrr 0, J> rSeS P r fP arin & for Agriculture: Zoology 1, 2,; 105 
09; Botany 1-4, 105a, 107; General Biology, 1, 2; 101 102 
103 certain courses in Chemistry, Physics and Geology;' gen- 
eral studies required m the course to be pursued. 

of S a C d h v°in^ ipS t !? B . i0l °f y arC avai,able to a limited number 
F n d r V *? C6d student s- See statement under "Scholarships." 
for the equipment of the department of Biology see under 

the heading "General Information " 



68 University) of Southern California 



Zoology 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 



1 C^nevPiX Zoology. This course is designed to give a 

throughout th! year. (Ritteuhouse, Beers.) 

9 PV,v«ioloev Lectures and laboratory work on (a) the 
ge 2 nera P l h ru S n°cS £ all living organisms (b) human physi- 
olo<*v. Prerequisite course 1 or Botany l. 
secSnd semester. (Ulrey, Beers.) 

103. Systematic Zoology. The co«™ d e^ c Wrfy wij 

^T^tfSr Iblrey, Daggett, 
Wyman.) 

104 Histology. This course gives the student an oppor- 

Laboratory work and 1™'"™'' ,„a' ,, '.T 
Three units; first semester. (Rittenhoose.) 

,05. Embryology A '^J'&J^IS&SS. 

S,Sr. P «,ri5 ;«.' h fee trtrt.si second 

semester. (Ritteuhouse and Assistant.) 

106. Comparative Anatomy, of Vertebrate? The ^ lab ora- 
tory work consists of djssectgn of ^e main^yp.es o f ^ 
vertebrate animals and a study o i in com _ 

different sy stems o .organs. The ££™ *» especially 

SThV ta d n y d poInt of'TvdopUnt Prerequisite, course 1. 
Three units; first semester. (Rittenhouse.) 

107. Mammalian Anatomy. The course con ^s°J* c *re- 



The College of Liberal Arts 69 

h££l In ^ e I , ec 1 ture , s s P ecial attention is given to the nervous, 
blood and skeletal systems, including an outline of their 

semesTer" 611 R - t f r \ reqU ' S te ' C ° UrSe l Three Units - : se ""d 
semester. (Rittenhouse.) 

rr}H S ' Economic Entomology. A study of orchard, field 
S" d 8 r rd ^ mSe - Ct P - ests '. the forest insects and household 
nf n/ S V , Cons ' de ration is given the control and eradication 
of insect depredations, the composition and application of in- 
secticides, and farm management to eliminate injurious in- 
sects. Lectures and laboratory work. Prerequisite, course 1 
(or an equivalent amount of Botany together with the insect 

tenhouse ) C ° UrSe >- ^^ ""^ Se *° nd semes ^" (Wt- 

109. Parasitology The organization, life history, and evo- 
lution of parasites; the protozoa and their relation to disease- 

n on a a V° 'Ta'*' Ucks ' an £ miteS in the transmission and 
propagation of disease; together with their control as a phase 
in medical entomology; and a study of helminthes and larger 
parasites Lectures and laboratory work. Prerequisite 

m/M • . ( ° r «* u ' valent in Botan y) and General Biology 3 
(Bacteriology). Three units; first semester. (Rittenhouse.) 

^f 2 r°"-, S / eCial Z °°, logy - An investigation of some problem 

stud™ s£ P h THe C ° UrSe ' l f P l anned for the needs P of each 
student. Six hours per week throughout the year Pre- 

T^^rStU) 2 ' m ' m 105 ' ° r theire ^ent. 

7^' Te ^ h D r ' S , C ° UrSe - A stud y of the Problem of teaching 
Zoology and Biology in the secondary schools. Two units 
first semester. (Ulrey, Beers.) ' 

212. Research. Investigation of some problem relating to 
pure or applied biology may be pursued by candidates for 
the degree of Master of Arts. (Ulrey, Rittenhouse.) 

Major Work in Zoology. Courses 1, 2; 103-106- General 
Biology courses 101, 103, 105, 106. General 

103*104; W ° rk ^ Z ° 0lOgy - Z °ology 1 and General Biology 
High School Teachers' Recommendation in Zoolosrv 

foT'io? &&T 106 ' 108 ' 2la 216; GeneraI Biolo^^; 

General Biology 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

*; Pe " onal Hygiene. Lectures and recitations on the 
P 1 lu at l° n and lm Provement of health. The course deals 
with the functions and care of the body with a view to attain 
ing the greatest possible degree of efficiency. Open to all 
students. Two units; first semester. (Ulrey) 



70 University of Southern California 

o Q a «itarv Science. A course of lectures on public hy- 
?ase», their Jis"J»™ ,,0 ° .»?! X |UtSt on and care of 

public health. Two units; second semester. (Ulrey.) 

?• ■^ftiir^ciXrrdS^ir- 

'SscS.fx.s^^ 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

house.) , 

1QL General ^^K^pSK'th! 

lo^ for ao S ,Tl S ^^labo rLry Wnin, 

102. Economic Bacteriology A ^g^ ^"^f^. 

ing primarily with bactenological [invest g "^ P^ Biol _ 
of sanitation and public health P" r e*u ""tes^a 
ogy 103. Three units; second semester, (.uirc^, 

103. Bionomics, A course of i lerture, .dealing witl^the 
fundamental principles , o Biol°gy ; Th proWe ^ ._ 
tance, development and sex are con S1 aerea sdec _ 
cal standpoint throughout the first semester iN .^ 
tion and other theories o f^^f^S 1 semester. Pre- 

^SStz^S^^S?^^ units; throushout the 

Two units; either semester. (Ulrey.; _ 

105. Seminar. The advanced students and fetors of 
t^SSStSSJ^ S r gy.° On P e TnV; throuW the 
year. (Ulrey, Rittenhouse, Beers.) 

106. Journal Club. Reports on the cu^enthteratnre of 
Biology One unit; throughout the year. (.Ulrey.,, 



The College of Liberal Arts 71 

At the Venice Marine Station 

Primarily for Graduate Students 

.,^° 7 'i biological Survey. A study of the marine animals 
and plants of the region, including their habitat, classification, 
distribution, and life habits. (Ulrey, Rittenhouse.) 

208. Experimental Biology. The course consists of a 
study of some special problem of biology for which the 
student s training prepares him. (Ulrey, Rittenhouse.) 

,i° 9 ' ^tfT^r A Hmited number of P^ate laboratories 
are available for free use by investigators who are prepared 

£,„ Car !7 ?V UCh wor > !» ve stigation may be carried on 
throughout the year. Application for these privileges should 
be made to the director of the station. (Ulrey, Rittenhouse.) 
Summer Course. The course consists of a study of Marine 
Biology in connection with the exploration carried on by 
the use of the station launch, the Anton Dohrn. The work 
is given at the laboratories of the Venice Marine Biological 
btation. Formal instruction is given only during the regular 
Bulletin SeSSI ° n tHe Universitv - See Summer Sefsion 

Botany 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. General Botany. The course comprises a study of 

typical plants representing the vegetable kingdom. The 

general morphology and structure of types of thrallophytes 

archegoniates and spermatophytes are studied. Attention is 

also given to habitat, environment, and general physiological 

st,?Hv fi S M and \ he ^"cultural phases of plants. Laboratory 

tear 7 ' MiZZ' ^ le f tu " eS - Four «™ts; throughout the 
year, (i.ite, and assistants.) 

2. Field Botany and Taxonomy. A study of flowerine 
wbh ts (fP f er t mato Phytes) in the local flora. The course deal! 
with habitats, po lenation, and the relationship of plants 

Thre^fmf^ ?S Iaborato ^ ho ™ ^ week, one semester, 
inree units; either semester. (Life.) 

of 3 soif w!, t!r J ht rdat L 0n ° f Plants to their environment 
, a tir,nl' p ' ?hy si °g.™phy, etc., and their structural adap- 
tations. Especially suited to agricultural students. Lectures 
field and laboratory work. Prerequisite, course 1. Two 
units; second semester. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

oln« J 13 ?* f h y, siol °gy- Experimental work on the physi- 
ology of plants; lectures and supplementary reading This 
course includes general experiments on the work and time- 



72 



University of Southern California 



tions carried on by living plants. Prequisite, course 1. 
Three units; first semester. (Lite.; 

104a Plant Processes. A. critical experimental study of 
growth SSlrSSW and exact experiment- , on the funda- 
Sn^ntal nrocesses with precise recording apparatus, ire 
« q u2itef cours^l04 Tliree units; second semester. (Life.) 

tf« Economic Botany. This course deals mainly with the 

o-iven attention in the course. One lecture ana wee 
alorj hours per week. Two units; either semester. (Life.) 

ifv^ Plant Propagation and Genetics. A study of the 

to ohvlogeny and the improvement of plants. Lect ures, 
quizzes and field work. Two units; second semester. (Life.) 

units; first semester. (Life.) 

m7 Plant Anatomy and Histology. The minute structure 
oft s?Sf,ndZ»e, S'-r'iorfy^S: 

?n8 Marine Algae. The morphology, classification and 
ecology of the marine flora, including collecting mounting, 
and preserving the algae of the adjacent coast. Three units, 
either semester. (Life.) 

training. Three units; either semester. (Life.) 

210. Botanical Journal Club. One unit; throughout the 
year. (Life.) 

Major Work in Botany Thirty semester units in Botany, 
including Course 1-3, 104, 104a, and 210. 

Minor Work in Botany. Botany 1, 2, 3, and 104. 

High School Teachers' ?£«"£-* TminimuTof^eve" 
Jffi?!arffS^2SK , ?0j Teacher's Course, 
and course 210. 



The College of Liberal Arts 73 

CHEMISTRY 

LAIRD J. STABLER, LEROY S. WEATHERBY, Professors 

BEATRICE WOODDELL, Instructor 

JENNIE DUBIN, LILLIAN McILVAINE, VERNON HODGE, 

GERTRUDE LEWMAN, V. LEWIS KAYE, KENNETH HOWELL, 

ARMANDO CERVI, MARJORIE HOWELL, Assistants 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Students without entrance credit in Chemistry should reg- 
ister in courses 1 and la; those with entrance credit should 
register in 2 and 2a. Course 2, 2a, 3, and 3a are prerequisite 
to all later courses in chemistry and comprise the required 
work in the engineering courses. 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry. A lecture and recitation 
course, covering the principles of inorganic chemistry. Open 
only to students who do not present entrance credits in 
chemistry. To be accompanied by course la. Three units; 
first semester. (Wooddell.) 

la. General Inorganic Chemistry. A laboratory course to 
accompany course 1. Two laboratory periods a week. Two 
units; first semester. (Wooddell and assistants.) 

Is. Elementary Organic, Food, and Textile Chemistry. 

Lectures and recitations introducing the composition and the 
chemistry of the simple fundamental organic compounds, 
especially those related to daily life. The course includes 
a special study of foods and food values, fuels, fabrics, dyes, 
perfumes, poisons, adulterants, natural and artificial coloring- 
compounds, and kindred topics. It is recommended to all 
non-technical students and is open to all who have had 
entrance chemistry or courses 1 and la. 

To be accompanied by course Is. a. Three units; seconc? 
semester. (Weatherby.) 

(It is advised that students desiring this course who have had entrance 
chemistry, register the first semester in courses 2 and 2a.) 

ls.a. Elementary Organic, Food, and Textile Chemistry. 

A laboratory course accompanying and supplementing the 
work of course Is. Two laboratory periods a week. Two 
units; second semester. (Wooddell, and assistants.) 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. Non-metals. Lectures and reci- 
tations with classroom demonstrations. Especial emphasis is 
placed on the principles and laws of inorganic chemistry, 
and their application in analytical work. To be accompanied 
by course 2a. Three units; first semester. (Weatherby.) 



74 University of Southern California 

2a. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory A laboratory course 

to accompany course 2. Especial emphasis is .laid on quanti- 
tative relations and the development of chemical laws. The 
latter part of the course is devoted to a study of reactions 
n solution, introductory to qualitative analysis Two labor- 
atory periods a week. Two units;, first semester. (Weath- 
erby, and Assistants.) 

3 Inorganic Chemistry. Metals. Lectures and recitations 
on the metals and metalloids, and their chief compounds, with 
especiarreference to their ^ technical value and commerc a 
use. To be accompanied by course 3a. Three units, sec 
ond semester. (Weatherby.) 

3a Qualitative Analysis. A laboratory course in the sys- 
tematic analysis and identification of simple and complex 
salts mixtures, metals, alloys, and commercial products. Two 
laboratory periods a week. Two units; second semester. 
(Weatherby and Assistants.) 

4a • 4b Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory practice in 

gravimetric and in volumetric determinations, with, occasional 

fectu™ and recitations. Prerequiste to all subsequent ana- 

ytical courses. Three laboratory periods a week Three 

units; throughout the year. (Stabler and Assistants.) 

UPPER DIVISION AND GRADUATE COURSES 

105. The Rarer Metals. A lecture an ^ laboratory course 
comprising a study of the occurrence, the metallurgy, the 
oSrties and the uses of the more important rare metals 
especiaHy 'those valuable for their technical uses; and .the 
determination of these metals in their ores and in their com- 
merical compounds. One unit, first semester. (Stabler.) 

106a. Inorganic Preparations. A laboratory course, includ- 
ing the preparation of inorganic compounds, with tests for 
purity an'r^ngth, supplemented by discussions on theory 
and methods. Two units; either semester. (Stabler.) 

107 Organic Chemistry. Lectures and recitations on the 
chemistry of the carbon compounds of both the aliphatic and 
theTo^atic series. . Especial emphasis on sy .Jgg 
chemistry. Two units; throughout the year. (Weatneroy.; 
107a Organic Preparations. A laboratory course in the 
preparation^ typical carbon compounds in both .the all p at C 
and the aromatic series, to accompany course 107. Two units, 
throughout the year. (Weatherby.) 

107b Organic Preparations - Advanced. A laboratory 
course in the preparation of higher organic compounds with 
supplementary reading on theory and methods. An exten- 
sion oT course 107a. Either or both semesters. (Weath- 
erby.) * 



The College of Liberal Arts 75 

108a. Mineral Analysis. Gravimetric and volumetric analy- 
sis of minerals, ores, and slags; rocks and cement; steel and 
alloys. Three units; first semester. (Stabler.) 

109. Physical Chemistry. A lecture course on the funda- 
mental principles and laws of chemistry. A general study 
of electro-chemistry is included in the work of the second 
semester. Two units; throughout the year. (Weatherby.) 

109a. Physical Chemical Measurements. A laboratory 
course to accompany or follow course 109. One laboratory 
period a week. One unit; throughout the year. (Weatherby.) 

109b. Physical Chemical Measurements — Advanced. A 
laboratory course with supplementary reading. An extension 
of the work of 109a. Either or both semesters. (Weatherby.) 

110a. Quantitative Analysis of Agricultural Products. 

Systematic analysis of soils, fertilizers, water, cattle feed, 
dairy products, and similar substances. Three units; first 
semester. (Stabler.) 

Ilia. Medical and Pharmaceutical Analysis. A labora- 
tory course, including urine analysis, toxicology, and assay of 
pharmaceutical products. Designed especially for students 
looking forward to medicine or pharmacy. Two units; either 
semester. (Stabler.) 

112a. Food Analysis. A laboratory course in the quanti- 
tative determination of the composition of food products and 
in the detection of food preservatives and adulterants. Ex- 
ercises in the analysis of sugar-house products and citrus 
by-products. Open only to those who have completed or 
are taking organic chemistry. Three units; second semester. 
(Stabler.) 

113. Industrial Chemistry. A lecture course covering the 
chemistry involved in the manufacture of important com- 
mercial products. The course is supplemented by lectures 
given by chemists from various manufacturing establish- 
ments, and by visits to technically important industrial 
plants. One unit; second semester. (Stabler.) 

113a. Oil, Gas, and Fuel Analysis. A laboratory course 
in the technical methods of oil, gas, and fuel analysis. A 
special oil laboratory is equipped for handling crude petro- 
leum on a basis commensurate with commercial practice 
One unit; second semester. (Stabler.) 

113b. Industrial Problems. The working on a semi-com- 
mercial scale of problems in industrial chemistry and chem- 
ical engineering. The course pre-supposes a knowledge of 
organic and of physical chemistry. Credit as arranged: 
either or both semesters. (Stabler.) 



76 University of Southern California 

114a Assaying. This course comprises silver and gold 
extraction by scorification and crucible methods; the hre 
assay of copper, lead, and tin; and the extraction of gold from 
ores by the amalgamation, the chlonnation, the cyanide, and 
the electrolytic processes. One or two units; second semes- 
ter. (Stabler.) 

215 Seminar. Reviews of current chemical literature; lec- 
tures'on subjects of chemical interest; papers and discussions 
on assigned topics. Open for credit to seniors and graduate 
students only. Required of all graduate students. One unit, 
throughout the year. (Weatherby.) 

216 Research. Research work, under the direction of the 
department, may be pursued by candidates for the degree of 
Master of Arts, in either pure or applied Chemistry. (Stabler, 
Weatherby.) 

217 Teacher's Course. A study of the teaching of -chem- 
istry in secondary schools. One unit; first semester. 
(Weatherby.) 

Laboratory Fees: In each laboratory course of two or 
of three units a fee of ten dollars each semester is required. 
In each one-unit course a five dollar fee is required In 
course 114a, an added fee of ten dollars is required to 
guarantee the cost of the materials consumed, of which the 
unusued balance is returned at the end of the course. 

A deposit of five dollars is required of each student each 
semester to cover the value of apparatus broken or dam- 
aged. The balance of this deposit, less deductions, is returned 
at the close of the year. 

Major Work: Minimum requirement, thirty semester- 
units following entrance chemistry or courses 1 and la. 
Required courses: 2, 2a, 3, 3a, 4ab 107, 107a. Further recom- 
mended courses 109, 109a, 113, 215, and at least ten units 
from the advanced analytical courses. 

Major in Domestic Chemistry: Twenty units in chemistry 
in addition to entrance chemistry, or 1 and la; and ten units 
in the department of Home Economics. Required chemistry 
courses: Is, lsa, 2, 2a, 3, 3a, 4a, 112a. 

As a minor subject, Biology is recommended, and the fol- 
lowing courses are suggested: Personal Hygiene, Sanitary 
Science, General Biology, Physiology, Bacteriology; total, 
twelve units. 

Minor Work: Fifteen semester-units. Courses 1, la; Is, 
lsa; 2, 2a; or courses 2, 2a; 3, 3a, and either Is, lsa, or 4ab. 



The College of Liberal Arts 77 

High School Teacher's Recommendation. Inorganic chem- 
istry, Qualitative Analysis, Quantitative Analysis, Organic 
Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Seminar, Teacher's Course, 
and at least one advanced analytical course. 

Master's Degree: Not less than one-half of the course 
pursued m the graduate year as candidate for the Master's 
Degree must be in Chemistry. The departments suggested 
trom which approved minor courses may be elected are: 
Physics, Biology, Mathematics, and Geology. The required 
courses in Chemistry beyond those required for an under- 
graduate major, part of which may have been taken as 
undergraduate electives, are 109, 109a, 113 215 216 The 
research work, including the thesis, should represent from 
four, to six units. 

DRAWING 

A. W. NYE, C. W. LAWRENCE, A. C. WEATHERHEAD, Professors 
WM. KREBS, Instructor 

1. Mechanical Drawing. Use and care of instruments, 
lettering, geometrical problems, projections and simple work- 
ing drawings. Three hours first semester and six hours 
D?a°win S6meSter ' CreditS ' TeXt: French,s Engineering 

3. Architectural Drawing. A course in architectural let- 
tering, detailing, and the preparation of working drawings 

ytL Ar ^Zli% Six hours ' two units; thro - ho - ^ 

<^'nW n P neering Dr ™£- Lettering, title building, topo- 
graphical mapping and preparmg detailed working drawings 
tlarrlnf "p""^ const ™etion. Six hours, firs? semester 
two credits. Prerequisite Drawing 1. 

5. Machine Drawing. Sketching of machine details prep- 
DrinHnl «£ a L 2 P drawin & s ' lettering, tracing and blue 
Drawing 1 rS ' semester > tw ° credits. Prerequisite, 

6. Descriptive Geometry and Stereotomy. A study of the 
problems relating to the point, line, and plane, and their ap- 
plication to practical engineering problems, intersection and 
development of surfaces, shades and shadows, perspective 

(WeSherhSdJ ^ h ° UrS ' tW ° UnitS; *™«*^ ^S 

7. Kinematic Drawing. Mechanism, velocity and accel- 
eration diagrams, cams and linkages. Six hours second 
semester; two credits. Prerequisite^ Drawing 5 

de?;rm, h n1nt S tf" d f h f d ° WS - f Brief and accur ^e methods for 

T" 1 ?" 8 f s , hadows of geometrical lines, plane figures 

and solids, and their application to the casting of colrven 



78 University of Southern California 

tional shades and shadows . on the Principal architectural 

members. Six hours, two units; second semester. (Weather 
head.) 

9 Perspective. The theory and application of the differ- 
ent methods of drawing architectural perspectives The per- 
spective of shadows and reflections. Six hours, two units, 
second semester. (Weatherhead.) 

100. Graphic Statics. The graphical determination of 
stresses in engineering structures. See Civil Engineering, 
lis! Three horns, one unit; first semester. (Lawrence.) 

101 Structural Design. Complete designs for steel 
br £es roofs "and other structures. See Civil Engineering 
118 Seven hours, three units; throughout the year. (Law- 
rence.) 

102 Teachers' Course. A study of the subject matter, 
texf books and "methods of presenting a high school mechan- 
ical drawing course. Students in this course are required to 
iHcr drawing classes from time to time. One unit, 
first semester. (Weatherhead.) 

ECONOMICS 

ROCKWELL D. HUNT, EMORY S. BOGARDUS, Professors 

OLIVER J. MARSTON, Associate 

C A WAYNE, K. T. INUI, JESSE RAY MILLER, HARRY H. 

BASKERVILLE, Lecturers 

EMERY E. OLSON, Instructor 

WAYNE JORDAN, Assistant 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

> *ssa.-js» -- «~ Sri 

5»°ts; throughout the year. (Hunt and Ass.stants.) 
2 Money Credit, and Banking. The origin and evolution 

finance. Three units; second semester. (Marston., 

SS Tgg S r.«on>X helds o< curr : » ? finance, and 

the tariff. Two units; first semester. (Marston.; 



The College of Liberal Arts 79 

5. Economic Geography. History and present status of 
industry and commerce in the world; the world market, and 
national policies in the development of resources, especially 
in the United States. (Same as Geology 104.) Two units 
second semester. (Bailey.) ' 

6. Household Economics. A study of the concrete prob- 
lems of housekeeping and of household administration. 
(Same as Home Economics, course 1.) Two units: first 
semester. 

7. Household Problems. An extension of course 1, to 
include a study of more general problems in household' ad- 
ministration and in home making. (Same as Home Eco- 
nomics, course 2.) Two units; second semester. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Municipal Problems. The rise and growth of the 
modern city. Chief emphasis is placed on American munci- 
pal government. Economic, administrative, and social prob- 
lems. Three units; first semester. (Hunt.) 

102. Labor Problems. The important labor problems of 
the day, with special reference to American conditions fol- 
lowing the great war. Three units; second semester. 
(Hunt.) 

103. Americanization and Immigration. A study of the 
general causes of migration in the world's history; European 
backgrounds of immigration to the United States. Special 
emphasis on present-day immigration problems. (Same as 
Sociology 103.) Three units; second semester. (Bogardus.) 

104. Corporations. Causes, growth, and forms; their pro- 
motion, financing, incorporation, capitalization, and consoli- 
dation. Analysis of reports, stock speculation, receiverships, 
and reorganizations. Social and political effects. Two units* 
first semester. (Marston.) ' 

105. Transportation and Communication. Theory and his- 
tory. Development of the railroad, its organization, man- 
agement, and consolidation. Ocean and inland waterways. 
Two units; second semester. (Marston.) 

106. Commercial Organization. Study of modern busi- 
ness methods. Attention to leading extractive industries; 
special studies in certain industries, and student reports Two 
units; first semester. (Marston.) 

107. Business Administration. An examination of the 
principles underlying the modern organization of business, 
both internal and external, with application of scientific man- 
agement. Two units; second semester. (Marston.) 



80 University of Southern California 

108. Socialism. The underling causes of the modern 
socialistic movement, study of various schools; a critical 
estimate of socialism as a philosophy of economic evolution 
and as a program of social reform. Two units; first semester. 
(Hunt.) 

110 Life Insurance. A comprehensive lecture course on 
the theory and nractice of Life Insurance; special attention 
to the concrete problems. Open to Sophomores. One unit; 
either semester. (Wayne.) 

111 Agricultural Economics. History and problems of 
rural" economics, followed by a study of agricultural com- 
merce. Two units; first semester. (Hunt.) 

112 Conservation of National Resources. Special prob- 
lems 'relating to the great war and reconstruction after the 
S Human conservation and the foundations of national 
prosperity. Two units; second semester. Open also to 
Sophomores. (Hunt.) 

113 Problems in Economic Reconstruction. The mean- 
ing of reconstruction, questions following demobilization 
economic readjustment to peace conditions. Problems n 
efficiency in production, trade and commerce, vocational edu- 
cation, and scientific management. Three hours; second 
semester. (Hunt.) 

114 Accounting: Theory and Principles. Relation of the 
science and art of Accounting to the economics of modern 
business Interpretation of the balance sheet, with special 
appkations in bank accounting, trust accounting, insurance 
accounting, etc. Three hours; second semester. . (Basker- 
ville.) 

115 Cost Accounting. General principles of cost account- 
ing with applications in factory and mercantile accounting. 
Frequent student exercises. Two hours; first semester. 
(Miller.) 

116 Technique of Trans-Pacific Trade. The commercial 
seoeraphf of the Far East, with study of industrial develop- 
ment Treaties of commerce and navigation, patents and 
copyrights trade routes and shipping, credit institutions, and 
customs and warehouse systems. Two hours; throughout 
the year. (Inui.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

200 Seminar. Designed to meet the needs of graduate 
students oTThe department. Major reports are based upon 
original investigation; reviewing of "« n » ^"^fwo 
icaf literature; topics of contemporaneous interest. Iwo 
units; throughout the year. (Hunt.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 81 

201. History of Economic Thought. Development from 
classical antiquity, with discussions of the different schoo s 
of economics. Extensive readings, with student reports 
Two units; throughout the year. (Hunt.) sports. 

thfll Re cent Economic Theory. A comparative study of 
the theories of contemporaneous economists and the tend- 
encies of the present day. Special reference to the problems 
of value and distribution. Two units; throughout the vear 
(Hunt.) (Not given 1919-20.) y ' 

Major Work in Economics: Thirty semester units. 
coJfr^l ^°i k ^Economics: Eight units in addition to 
courses. Whl ° h mUSt be in Upper division 

High School Teacher's Recommendation: 1, Principles- 2 

Es ey iO? nd T B r k p g; K 3 / PubHc Finance ' m > Municioaf Prob- 
lems 102, Labor Problems, or 113, Reconstruction; 104, Cor- 
porations, an<U05, Transportation, or 106 and 107. Conimer- 
201 W^ mzat i°£ and Busi ^ ss Administration; 200, Seminar; 
201, History of Economic Thought, or 202, Recent Economic 
ineory; six units of additional approved work. 

EDUCATION 

For courses in education see under "School of Education." 

ENGINEERING COURSES ELECTIVE IN ARTS 

^ n £r° f u the courses o^red under Chemical, Civil, Electri- 
cal, Mechanical or Mining Engineering, may be elected 
toward the Bachelor of Arts degree but not to exceed 15 
units may be so used. These courses may also be trans- 
ferred by engineering students seeking credit toward the 
Arts degree, together with courses in science, drawing etc 
taken in regular Arts classes; in such cases, however, not to 
exceed 18 units of credit may be transferred for anv one 
semester s work. J 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

ALLISON GAW, PAUL SPENCER WOOD, JAMES MAIN DIXON, 
- Professors 

ELIZABETH YODER, Associate Professor 

M * nt^lV^ SCOTT ' MARYETT E G. MACKEY, Assistant Professors 

CHARLOTTE M. BROWN, G. VIRGINIA SMITH, Instructors 

EUNICE A. MOORE, Assistant 

1. Introductory Course. Practice in composition, based 
upon a study of representative works in English literature. 
Required of all candidates for the bachelor's degree Three 
units; throughout the year. (Gaw, Wood, Scott, Mackey, 



82 University of Southern California 

lb. Training in spelling ^d punctuadon; for S todenUfaU-; 

S&^TS^^MS credit for 

English 1. One hour; each semester. (Moore.} 

1918-1919. (Brown.) 
10. Argumentation and Debate. .**?""*'?£?$%£. 

20. General History of English Literature Reqmred of 

(Wood, Scott.) 
<n Tvoes of Literature. An introduction to the study of 

63 Studies in the Modern Novel An analytical study of 

Tcter Two units; throughout the year. (Wood.) 

70. Great Books and Their Writers. ^J™^^* 
selected works of Galsworthy, George ?A lot, vrmon and 

Two units; throughout the year. (Scott.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

Note-Many of the following courses may ^^ t ^" ar ^^j 
be elected by graduate students for £™X**t™. preparation and 

VZ^ouTt^J^tofottA requfrenrents as to the work 
of the course. 

m* Advanced Composition. Descriptive and narrative 
wrh ng; th V e^hort-story P Prerequisite a high grade » Eng- 
lish 1 Two units; both semesters. (Wood.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 83 

110. Introduction to the Study of Language. The progres- 
sive and conservative forces entering into linguistirevolu- 
taon; the relations of English to the°other members of the 
Indo-European group; the genera! history of the English 

p a r n e g p U ara g t e ion ^^ ^^ io A so ^moL whhafeqt te 
preparation. Three units; second semester. (Gaw.) 

J)L M M En * 1 » h - A stUQ y of West Saxon English prior 

o the EZZV\?TT eSt ' T th - 6 u mphasis u P° n its relations 
to the English of today, and with some attention to the lit- 
erary importance of the readings in prose and verse Re- 
yeTr (Gaw ) gl ' Sh maJ ° rS - Three un V throughout the 

126. The Period of Chaucer. A survey of Chaucer's life 
and times; readings principally in the "Canterbury Tales" 
and Troilus and Cressida." Two units; second semester. 

lssfififin' 011 ; ^ 3 *, literature of the Elizabethan Period, 
1557-1660. A study of the principal authors and types of non- 
dramatic literature of the period. Not offered 1918-19 
154'?°a^?6. E ' iZabethanDramatic Li terat U re see courses 154,'l54b, 

135. The Classical Period. 1660-1760. Dryden, the Au-us- 
ans, Johnson and his circle, the evolution of Journaltsm 

out ry^r.^^oVd^ 60 - 0355 ^ 5 " 1 - TW ° -^ *™^ 

. 137. The Romantic Period. 1760-1832. Chief attention 

LE^nS a®,^ *™ *^ and 

mven' J h * Victorian Period. 1832-1892. Chief attention is 
Arnold Z V y % n ' I ? r ° wnm a Carlyle, Newman, Ruskin, 
Arnold the Pre-Raphaehtes, and Swinburne. Two units- 
throughout the year. Not offered, 1918-19. 

143 Contemporary British and American Poets. A con- 
sideration of the chief writers of verse in the English lan- 
fsTef S (Wo d ) dCath ° f Ten ^ SO »- Th ^e units^rst sern- 

145. American Literature. A survey from the beeinnine 
o the present day. A careful study of Colonial and fevolu* 

he chkf W N n",! 1S ,f e r d aS the basis for a consideration of 
nnf.rc. Nlne teenth Century productions. Throughout the 
course, especial attention is paid to the relations between 

?eTr enC (^o a o n d d ) BntiSh HteratUre - TW ° "** thro n u S gh b ourthe 

poSv ^e^ I f r % P V tr7 ' ThC SphCre a " d COntents of 
poetry as related to the fine arts and literature; the nature 

and types of epic and lyric; meter and tone-color as inter- 



84 University of Southern California 

Three units; second semester. (Oaw.) 

154 156 Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Drama. A de- 

year. (Gaw.) 

154b Shakespeare's Historical Plays. For description of 
this T course seeVpartment of HUtory conrse 102. Two 
units; one semester each course. (Dixon.) 

158. The Modern Dran^ .TJ f h ^^ £$£ 
%Z\l7^tll° of he ib P s r e e n ent T d hrIe units; throughout the 
year. (Gaw.) 

177 Pinnvan A study of the life and works of the Puri- 
tan^alle^t 11 - and Idealist. Two units; first semester. 
(Dixon.) 

180a Burns. A study of the central figure of modern 
Scottish lyrical poetry and .his literary environment. Two 
units; second semester. (Dixon.) 

182a Scott as an Historical Novelist. . Special attention 
is given tc "Old Mortality," "Rob Roy," "Waverly and 
"Cly Mannering." One unit; second semester. (Dixon.) 

183a Tennyson. The poet as lyrist and as interpreter of 
his ige,w11h y special attention to "In Memonam." Two 
units; second semester. (Dixon.) 

183c. Browning. A study of the art and teaching of Rob- 
ert Browning, with special attention to The ^ Ring and 
Book." Three units; second semester. (Wood.) 

184b Ruskin. His ethical, esthetic, and economical teach- 
ings. Two units; first semester. (Dixon.) 

191a. Versification. The philosophy of poetry; Ae radi- 
cal distinction between poetry and prose; the music of prose 
anrtnoetrv respectively! the classical terminology of versih- 
eatlo^taL/^n^ua/ti'ty of syllables; its defi oencies and 
how to remedy them by a due recognition of n f 'ess phys 
iology and versification; an historical treatment of the line, 
couplet, and stanza. Two units; first semester. (Dixon.) 

191b Poetry Allied to Music. The development of the 
lyric; ballad measures; a study of hymns from the earliest 
Latin forms to the present; the laws of rhyme. Two units, 
second semester. (Dixon.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 85 

f J! 6- -rT he Dev< ; lo Pment of Democracy in English Litera 
IZ \ he f? Wt ^ ,° f the idea of democracy as reflected ?n 
the work of Enghsh writers, from the earliest time to thl 

a n re e admitte n em T ry - ^T" 8 with ^equ^e ™ parat on 
are admitted. Two units; first semester. (Mackey.) 

see'LuSonl^Thlr- F ° r . descri P tio » of the course 

as sssLsrs safe agSHS? 

GRADUATE COURSES 

224. Early Middle English Literature A ct^. „i * • i 

year. (Wood.) ' 9 " Two umts ; throughout the 

294. The English Seminar. Subject for 101 S 10 ti 
Theory of the Stanza. One unit; throughout the'yfr ^ 



i"" d " g E*fiS , f ai0 , r W ° rk ' Th '«? ■«">«<«■ ™i.s, to ad- 

with especial force to^.p^KeaSrs ^ appUeS 

at the beainnina j/Ll • 0/ /A -f department of that fact 

complicaZns tha/ will rZT, ^ /"fc* '° rfo *> ^ «"«* 

Minor Work. Ten semester units in addition to course 1. 



8 6 University of Southern California 

Requirement for the High School *5£J««|8J!£ 

undergraduate English major course f ?'p| a ° r y tment . The 
of eight graduate urn s » t e E ^1 , UO U2, a period 
course as a whole must incluae cou , addition the 

Candida f muTcredSbly S *« "English final examina- 
tions for graduates," as described below. 

Requirements for the Degree of £*£* Art* A sat, s- 
factory undergraduate Enghshm^ajorwur.s 
graduate course organized as presc nbed in t g and 

lati0 ^ f ° r *fth d Xe requirements concerning the "English 

» f ^TE^^^ Greef, Latin, Ger- 
man, or French. 

of all English major candidates . fo : the Recommendation a 
Arts or for the High School ^ eac £ er s K f he honors in 
m0 re comprehensive tej of f.toe^ 

question. 1 his win r e^ui c habitual use of scholarly 

£»»ri^t&TS^~p 1 S *• subject-matter in- 
volved. The equipments required are: 

L Familiarity obtained £ first hand ^ whh the du*-£. 

2 Satisfactory special knowledge of one of the main lit- 
erary periods movements, types, or authors. 

in Th""bov« examinations are ^^''\Z"<SSii!T^"' 
and must be taken at some tune torn _tbj ? n Ca ° e e ™ tio i U to 

&r;&s wh c c , h „d?/,.e d s s <; e , e aisss, "<a«- «* 



The College of Liberal Arts 87 

^•J'^ h "^commended grades" in each of the five divisions 
«£« £ \ ^"^ates for the degree of Master of Am must 
show high merit in three of the five divisions. In lieu of divi 
s.ons 2 and 4 the candidate may offer final exam nations in 
advanced courses covering material of the nature described 
which examinations shall have been taken at this ' University 
within the same academic year. university 

FRENCH 

LAWRENCE M. RIDDLE, EDGAR M. VON FINGERLIN, 

Professors 

KENNETH M. BISSELL, Associate Professor 

MARGARET G. BORTHWICK, Assistant Professor 

BERTHA » ™!?Z H H - SAINT "JEAN, Instructor 

BERTHA M. BEAUDRY, ALICE LIZOTTE, ELSA SCHROEDER 

Assistants ' 

rea'din^ le r.TF tary J i,r . ench - Grammar, elements of phonetics 
reading of French texts. Outlines of French oolitical his 

year fR^ T v'fP . c , ent c tn 7- Five units^throughout the 
year. (Bissell, Borthwick, Saint-Jean, Beaudry.) 

R^lic^*? ? tenC h Readin gs from the Romanticists and 

Lliaf D "u C K m Z g oi? ate ; U p b 1 ri \ nd ' Hv A g °' Lamartine Sand, 
naizac, uaudet, Zola, and Flaubert. Outlines of French lit 

,7nlL Ure th° f 'u e ni " eteen th century. Composition Three" 
units; throughout the year. (Riddle.) ee 

no 3 yVli^f de - m , F 'i enCh \ Readin ^ from contemporary French 
R^Ifl r lnC,Ud '" g Anatole France > Loti, BourLt and 
Bazin. Composition. Three units; throughout the yeaV 
Prerequisite, course 1. (Bissell.) y 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

106. French Literature of the Seventeenth Cent,,™ a 
general survey with snecial attenti™ *W r T n „ ry '. A 
and Moliere Offered W n • Co ™ elUe > Racine, 
year. (Riddle.) ThrCe Un,ts; tfer °"ghout the 

107. French Literature of the Eighteenth C P ntnr» a 

the year. (Riddle.) Three Units; thr oughout 



108. 

tine 



L F S nch Ly T ric Poetry of th e Romantic School Lamar 

One unit; second 'semeste! ? Ud (RiddlO PhCat, ° n fran?a!se '' 

2 nH T rCnCh ?7 nta L X and Com P<>sition. Prerequisite- course 
^ or 3. Two units; throughout the year. (Bissell.) 



88 University of Southern California 

110. Elementary French Conation -Student, are d, 

111 Teachers' Course. Methods and aims in the teach- 
ing of French Two units; second semester. (Riddle.) 

112. Readings from ^^^J^ilftffiX 

is conducted entirely ^.F^/^^^^er consultation with 
?Z^nT^%T^t^Tonl^ year. (Bissell.) 

124.. French, Phones. Nyrop *£*£&£&,£ 
Sse ? " S Two e unitSou g h R the year'. (Riddle.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

u Qp^in^r Studies in French literature. Two 
221. French Seminar, ^tumes m x 
units; throughout the year. (Riddle.) 

'mS-W.^Two '"ante; e Sr S ou?£o„. .h« year. (Riddle.) 

223. French Dram, rf <h. S "»"?* J^kolIS 
S^d^S^^rir'S^ .Hear. (Riddle.) 

,» • \x,~e-L. TViirtv units exclusive of 
Undergraduate Major Work lairty- un and 

tory of French Literature. 

2,5. Re.di.vg o. Old French T««. ^» f ^on^Ro- 
^•;;^So.na£te7'»cie d „ Se .,l» S a i8 .» Twou.i., 

throughout the year. (Riddle.) 

Undergraduate Minor Work. Ten units exclusive of course 
1 and including courses 2 or 3, and 1UV. 

High School Teacher's R-ommendationr The ^mre- 
ments for major work course 1H, and a mi ate must 

I^Tasran^oVaTtd^^itten^mination in French syn- 
tax and French pronunciation. 



The College of Liberal Arts 89 



GEOLOGY 



GILBERT E. BAILEY, Professor 
ALLAN E. SEDGWICK, Associate Professor 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Physiography and Meteorology. A study of the sur- 
face features of the earth, and their relations to human life 
and industries; and a study of air currents, clouds and their 
mterpretation, weather observations and predictions, and 
heir relat.on to aviation and navigation. Lectures and recita- 
tions. Three units; one semester. 

of 2 de^rmSo,T'of A t f tUdy ° f P ro P erties > uses, and methods 
™™ f t u " ° f the most important minerals ores and 
gems Laboratory, recitations, and lectures P™~m,,v? 
Chem.stry 2 or its equivalent.' Two lZlT\JoulZTlt 

sec 3 ond s e em a e:t d er MetaIS - See Chem -try 3 and 3a. Five units; 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

oi. tt ar^^.&t!SneS. aiemi ^ 10S » d 105a ' 
firsi'senSeT 1 Ana ' ySiS - See Chemis ^ 108a. Three units; 

second feSer^ S * ^""'^ 1M * °" e - two units. 



90 University of Southern California 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Texts, Schuchert Paleography <,! North »« , ^^ 

^•/gsG&L&Efi <&«* »• E "° pe - Two 

? r T Dtosf™ C Ba'fcy? G-rOrfgln oY'Cahforoia 0,e, 

Two units; second semester. 

f*T?RMAN 

Ae,rt«/<;<]ff> Professors 



Associate Professors 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 



1. Elementary German. J^^TW^t&r^n. 
Two units; second semester. (Biles.; 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

Ad.anc.d courses are offered ta ^^tSU^'S til 
apply- GREEK 

CLAUDE C. DOUGLAS, Professor 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

rv^ir A studv of forms and syntax, fol- 
1. Elementary Greek. M ^ t ^ u ^ d OI Le g e nds and portions of 
lowed by the reading ;o My ^J^f n se composition. 

Xenophon's Anabasis, and exerciseb 111 i 
Three units; throughout the year. (Douglas.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 9| 

la. Elementary Greek. Especially for students orenarino- 

ection e s W f7 Tx ent ^ek Forms Ld Syntax an frTdnJ 

(DongL) Xen0ph ° n - FlVe Units = throughout the yean 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

!. 02 ^ Gree ! 1 Prose W "ters- Selected orations of Lvsias 
and Demosthenes: Plato's Apology. Lectures on the t 
and development of Greek oratory, and the pohtical and 
comXt,T t,tUtl0n i S ° f At u henS - °»™ to student who have 
^ eScT^ree^ til fe^^Vougfaf) ^ 

(cSnutd) e an? C^o ^Kmu^ Hero^ ^ttfl 

students who have completed course 102. Three units sec- 
ond semester. (Not given 1918-19.) ' 

TTT° 4 n^ HOmen I -'\ ad ' B ? ok L se 'ection from Books II and 

the 1 ' MyceneT; A^ "flS of „ several ^oks. Lectures on 
tne Mycenean Age, and the Homeric Problem Ooen to 

eau1vale S nt Wh °T. haVe C °. m ^ d courses 102 and 103 o? theS 
equivalent. Three units; first semester. 

105 Greek Tragedy. Aeschylus' Promethus Bound- 
Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus or Antigone. Lectures on the 
rise and development of the Greek drama, the Greek the 

who Ct'mfcl "^ in i hG ClaSS - b - De » to stud n 
wno nave completed the preceding courses Three units- 
second semester. (Not given 1918-19.) ' 

106. History of Greek Literature. A lecture course ar 
» tte^par.me,,,. Two J it <? &\ * "WS 

sculpture and its more important remains. Open^o all Uooer 
Si™) tS ' TW ° UnitS; SeC ° n . d Semester (Not^v P e e n 

110. New Testament Greek. Portion <; nf th» r i 
connected historically, with coismnt^view of^orSTnd" 
constructions as a necessary basis for corrected intworeta 
(Souglal) CXegeSiS - TW ° h ° Urs throughout "he Tea" 

cf 1 ^ 2, ^^ nc . ed New Testament Greek. \ n exee-erical 
study of Galatians, Corinthians, Romans, Philippians^Tnes- 



92 University of Southern California 

salonians and Hebrews. Two hours throughout the year. 
(Douglas.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

208. The authors read in this c«« c ^^.^Vffi 
to year according to the previous work and tastes ot 
students concerned. 

HISTORY 

TULLY C. KNOLES, ROY MALCOM, ROCKWELL D. HUNT, 

JAMES MAIN DIXON, Professors 

LAWRENCE T. LOWREY, Associate Professor 

DELLA TOTTON EARLY, Assistant Professor 

GENEVRA BROWN, Assistant 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

2 . Social and Political H^y of Modem Europe. £ 

course covering the field oi ^ u ™^ Be£fntd for the pur- 
teenth century to the present time, lie £J£ f society; 

pose of giving a genera Uu v "^S throughout the 
politics, science, and literature, m^ 
year. 

3. (taurri History. An .i"'°?"J'°£X"™" »f»^'» 

Lowrey.) 

given 1918-'19.) 

units; second semester. (Not given 1918-19.) 

7 . Mediaeval History. A general survey of ^mfaeval 
period, with special reference ^J^^'Xscussions on 

units; both semesters, (barly.j 

IS. History of the United States 1787 1850 A -tudy^of 
the development and history of national me in d 

States from 1787. to *e Compromise oflSSa Lecttres a^ 

K» ^ —- 

(Malcom.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 93 

13a. History of the United States 1850-1912 A ™, *• 
em timi C °r e - 1 ? fr ° m the Compromise of 1850 to th^'pr"" 

semester. (Malcom.) to *"u"s>. inree units; second 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 



(b) Celtic Scotland, with soecial attPntW T / c, , e ' 

"Macbeth." Three unitV fir«? attent , lon to Shakespeare's 
given 1918-*19) ' St semester - (Dixon.) (Not 

mmmmm 

Pomlcal^dente 1 !^^ 8 U " der th * Contitution. See 
com.) science 1U8a - Two units; second semester. (Mal- 

stud ems C m"h1c"tefTheor rSe F**" P* "** for 

year. (Douglas.) Tw ° Units; throughout the 

Sophomore, C'^fiU^ J^SS/""^ 



94 t/niver«<9 o/ Southern California 

. .-.„„,, r(M .c of Vienna. A course cov- 
in. Europe Since the Congress ot ' vienn Na _ 

the year. (Knoles, Lowrey.) 

112. Asiatic Studies. . (a) The founding of British Rule 
^Hindustan with special attentio to the ^ 
and Hastings., (a) The :Sp^J Xmerican Occupation. . (c) 
of the Philippines and th e rece ™£ atte ntion to the epic of 

SAKSf^S^ fti&W S i«n ,*« 
113. China. See Oriental Studies, No. 105. 



114. English Constitutional History. ^g^SSLSS. 

the origin and the evo ution of the ^ ^.^ ^ or 2 
^roTeVe r rt n T918"l d 9. reP T°wo unus; throughout the year. 

115. English *^j&*tf*™3%jl^ t & 

ering the. economic : and _ soaal huto y . course 1 or 2. 

ssrjsr^^sssrv given i918 -' 190 

116. Pacific Slope History A ^J^^S^ 
ginning tnth the Sp»»h^lom^yrtem ^ ment f 

ilization in New Spain, the oc cu l . the American con- 

Alta California and the Oregon temj o y , j 

quest; the genesis of the Empire ^State ^o designed 

reference to California throughout 1 ^ thos xpect . 

I^^Teac^hSS! t0 T h wo t0 unit S; throughout the year. 
(Hunt.) 

U7. The Exp**™ »l Europe Smce ^"gS^S"?. 

ssrsas^fflSS-^ — •• throosho '" ,he 

year. (Not given 1918- IV. .) - 

118. Parties and Governments in Europe. See Political 
Science 101. 



The College of Liberal Arts 95 

GreX lifrSl fu^Tl A , C - idcal Studv of the conditions of 
Ureek life and thought, making a careful study of the evolu- 
tion of political and social institutions. Lectures paler s on 

ne S „f e ned ^ b,eC ». tS f ° r ' esearch - °P en only to adVa P nced stu" 
dents and teachers. Two units; first semester. (Fariy.) 

-eSs ^1, ^tOS* 7 ' A - SC ^ eS °l investigations into the 
t^i\ ?' gr T-' and organization of the Roman State with 
EPS 5 '!!" thC k i ter Re P u b!-an and early Tm- 
fects f!l; \ ° tU A eS ' readln S s ' Papers on assigned sub- 
eachers t™ \ ° Pen ? nly t0 advan ced students and 
teachers. Two units; second semester. (Early.) 

in 121 \t?*^ rld Pre P ara t»°n for Christianity. A course deal- 
ing with the contributions of the ancient religions and nh 

eTetel 'tf S ? Ck fi ° f ideas out of whlfh ChHsda'ni y 
mt ? 19) UmtS; firSt semester - (Knoles.) (Not given 

thf/' .P Ut ° ri °g»I*y. A critical and comparative studv of 
the leading historians, chiefly of the nineteenth century their 
materials methods of investigation and presentation' with 
toS ral , c . onsid S[ ati °n .of the development of modern £ 
191fr?197 ltin& ' thrOUghout the y™- (Not [given 

200 16 " American Gov emment. See Political Science No. 

222. The History Seminar. The purpose of the Seminar 
is to improve the method of study of history tc live S 
ing in h.stonca method and criticism; to assist students T n " 

Lan, g l C is n l trU c ; CtlVe F'K*" a guide to the study of meSod 
tor^^^s^/ 6 ^^" 1 ^ 1 "^ 11 ^^" to the St^dy of h£ 

and America Each student must show ab' ft/ to do f lor 
ough research work. Two units; throughout the year 

m Sf - W ° rk: l h '^ y se ™ster units, one-half of which 
must be in upper division courses. 

*ESS£EZ. Ten UnhS ' inC,Uding at kaSt f0Ur in "PPer 

High School Teachers' Recommendation: Six units each 
of Ancient, Mediaeval, Modern, English, and American HU 
tory, courses 216 and 220. American His- 



96 University of Southern California 

HOME ECONOMICS 

LEROY S. WEATHERBY, Professor 
BEATRICE WOODDELL, Instructor 

units; first semester. _ rn ,, rqe 1 to in- 

2. Household Problems. An extension C admini- 

clude a study of more general problems ; m ^ehalC 
stration and in home making. Two units, secon 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

General Chemistry and Elementary [f %£&*% 

Chemistry, Courses 1, la, is, isa, ui 
• :<L tn tVip following- courses: 
»7oTZ:ioL^\ study of food Product, "to im- 
position, occurrence or manufacture, uses, food value, costs, 
Relative economy, etc. T^ units; first semester 

104. Nutrition and Dietetics. A stud y o t ioo v 

tion and of the metabolism and uses > of food >" the b Y 

A study of food requirement, balanced diets, aim 

menus Two units; second semester. 

m n pJLration of Foods. Practice in the preparation 

iTboTatory period weekly. One unit; first seme t * 

106. Preparation and Servmg o Food. -The > rfanmn ^ 
menus and the preparation of &*™* * r °Pj r %fo„ f complete 
£3? ^tSora^/pS'TeX One^i,; A- 



TXor.tory F«s: A f«, of five delta i, required i„ 
ITALIAN 

EDGAR M. VON FINGERLIN, Professor 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Elementary Italian Grammar Readings ^Mod^rn 
Writers. Goldom's Comedies, Composition, 
throughout the year. Alejandro Manzoni, 

■£JZT2». ft^?snSrsA .»— • 

the year. 



The College of Liberal Arts 97 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

as J Wrif?rf *% PetafC f' T aSS u°- Liter *ture: Italian Patriots 
as Writers. Two units; both semesters. Throughout these 
courses the Italian Language will be used as much .as Pos- 
sible with particular emphasis upon the Roman pronuncia- 

JOURNALISM 

HENRY JAMES, Instructor 

work N F^,r ai £ N . e ^ w , ri t in S- Basis of P rac ^cal journalistic 
work. Four or eight laboratory periods weekly, gathering 

cridcTsm g O°ne ne i WS ; mtervi T, S ' fea u tUre articles ; ^dividual 
criticism One lecture weekly, the modern newsoaoer- 
sources of news, staff organization, and duties- meThaS 
processes, news problems. Three or five units;' fkst semes 
ter. (Not given 1918-19.) semes- 

2 Development of Newswriting. Continuation of Course 

I. Four or eight laboratory periods weekly. One lecture 
rufna y iis?s °T y hr°e f e Am T Can ^ ournalism and^ives of great 
g°ven 1918119.T * U " ltS; S6COnd seme ster. -fN.ot 

3. Copyreading and Editing. Work of the copydesk Re- 

5K sheet '"nr^ ° f , COp V ^? oiread ' m ^ ™inKnc e of a 
catfon TwA n pn f nClpl ?\ of makeup; editing of small publi- 
cation. 1 wo or four laboratory periods weekly, in connec- 

bo o n k Wlt Tw C o OU n rSe ^ ; ° ne r - eCitat -T Weeklv on ^ o° "ext- 
1918 19.) " UmtS; elther semest er. (Not given 

liriw A WrV Sing V theory and practice of commercial pub- 
tfadveX, & ° advert ' sl "g copy; psychological principles 
SmoaT/n T g J. yP T^ Hy - Pre P arati on of an advertising 
campaign. Two units; first semester. (Not given 1918-19.) 

6. Newspaper Advertising. Detailed study of this soecial 

Troia„ 1S " ng n ed lT : PraC i ka i W ° rk in connection with "'The 
=/r Ja . V lrc u. latlon and advertising rates. Work of the 

solicitor, advertising agency, newspaper service bureau Two 
units; second semester. (Not given 1918-19.) 

™tu TyPO^aPhy .and Printing. Laboratory course in the 
mechamcs of printing, with occasional lectures. Typesetting 
printing, folding, binding; study of type-faces aXertS 
SSTS» te^ ^ diSpky On/U^J^SS^. 

II. Newspaper Administration. Business aspect of the 

?n$fi T* C ° Untry , W - eekly ' Records and accounting S ys ems 
costfind.ng, circulation and advertising methods; the news- 
paper budget. (Not given 1918-19.) 



98 University of Southern California 

1? Newspaper Law. Legal privileges and limitations of 
thl^meriSSTnewspaper. Libel and *^^ t tfJ3Hfc 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Advanced News and Feature Writing A practical 

m Wrialized Writing. Particular attention to the 
coumVySpapfr, Zss periodical and trade .journal. Three 
units; second semester. (Not given 1918-19.) 

102. Comparative Journalism. Study, and contrast of va- 

Two units; first semester. (Not given 1918-19.) 

103 Current Events and the Editorial. Summaries of 

semester. (Not given 1918-1V.) 

UK Literarv Laws of Editing. Growth of position of 

Two units; second semester. (Dixon.) 

107 History of Journalism. Beginnings and growth .oi 
th press Its development in America, Live. , of the grea 
journalists. In alternating years with Course U/. (woi 
given 1918-19.) 

in« Seminar Individual work in writing or special in- 
.eSatfoTo^opic. Hours for c-sul-ion to be arranged. 
One, two or three units; either semester, ^ul s 
1919.) 

S^a^.'Th-'r^St'ct.S £2£i. No, g ive» 
1918-19.) 
200 Reviewing andi the Higher Journalism. Rise of re- 



The College of Liberal Arts 99 

SSJ'rith 1 Structural element of the Master's thesis. Two 
units; either semester. (Dixon.) 

olXfi W0 JV, Twenty units in Journalism, including 
Courses 1 and 2 (or equivalent); 3 and 102 or 103. Ten units 

Course [in ?n Sh 'f^ COn ° miC u S - ° r Sociol ^y. not including 
Course 1 in any of those subjects. Journalism majors take 

Pn'the major. 1 " ™ ° f theS6 three de P artme "ts deluded 

sufg i e 1 s ted WOrk: Te " UnitS - C ° UrSeS l > 2 ' 102 and 103 ^ 

Economics Sociology, History and English Literature are 
of essential importance to Journalism students Attentfon 
lociofo n 4 y rioo C V Ie T d '^he following courses: Principles of 
sociology (100); Immigration and Americanization n<m- 

SoZ n ^Ut\V^ S T a \ P -^o«ogr (I20)?ffif to g^ 

social i nought (205); Contemporary Soc al Thought C206V 
Municipal Problems (101); Labor Problems (102V H Istorv 
of Modern Europe (2); History of the United States 13a) 

%£?($,% ffsS of Engllsh Llterature (20 ^ Shake - 

LATIN 

RUTH W. BROWN, Professor 

WELCOME A. TILROE, Assistant Professor 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

i^ la '^ ? le ™ entar y Latin. A course in forms and syntax fol- 

Caesar y Fv. C re ? 1 d,n ?, of si ™P le P^se and selections from 
Laesar. hive units; throughout the year. 

2 b - Cicero and Virgil. Selected orations of Cicero- Vir- 
gil s ^ene.d, Books I-IV, and parts of Book VI Intended 

School S?nTh haVe C ? mpI t ted U ° r two years of High 
school Latin. Three units; throughout the year. 

• * 2C ' a ^ atin Prose Com Position. Exercises in writing Latin 
mtended to accompany course 2b. One unit; throughout the 



3 Cicero and Livy. Cicero, De Senectute; Livy, Book 
XXI. Open to students who present four units of latin for 
se n me a s n t C e e r'. * ^° have C ° mpleted 2b " Three units-Vm 

a Ji tr Lh 7 an ^ Horace - Livy, Book XXII; Horace Odes 
and Epodes. Open to students who have completed course 3 
Three units; second semester. 'P'etea course o. 

written^erclL^Tot "^^ ° f Syntax in Ie etures and 
Temester accompany course 3. Two units; first 



100 University of Southern California 

fi T atin Prose Writing and rapid reading of Latin prose 
narVadve To accompan? course 4. Two units; second 

semester. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

These courses may be elected for graduate credit 
by special arrangement. 

first semester. 

asks Sits astftfls^s 

units; second semester. 

offered in 1919-20.) 

,10 Ho,...'. S„ir ? »d E pis« S . Selected Sa,i«s c »»d 

semester. 

115. Advanced Latin Prose Composition. One unit; 
throughout the year. 

units; second semester. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

216 The Teaching of Latin. A study of problems and 

methods. Two units; first semester. 

offered in 1919-20,) 

Two units; second semester. 

throughout the year. 



The College of Liberal Arts 101 

Major Work. Thirty units, including Latin 3, 4, 5, 6 115 
and 120, exclusive of courses la, 2b, and 2c. A student' may 
graduate as a Classical major who presents twenty units of 
Latin and at least twelve units of Greek. 

Minor Work. Courses 3, 4, 5, and 6. 

High School Teacher's Recommendation: An undergradu- 
ate major course followed by a minimum of six graduate 
units in this department, including 216. 

MATHEMATICS 

PAUL ARNOLD, Professor 
HUGH C. WILLETT, Associate Professor 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Theory of Algebra. A lecture and text book course 

in which emphasis is placed principally upon the theory and 

the development of algebra. This course includes a review 

of ftin^ T f Ipbra, special attention being given to proofs 

^f!^ c ^ ent ^l aWS and P nnci P le s. Three units; both sem- 
esters. ^/xrnolcl.J 

aSiJUfA t^ ! Ph r r J Cal Ge ometry. T he fundamental prop- 
fim°s n e S m este? e fwlfett.) ^^ ° f ^ Three Unit ^ 

t,v£ Tri gonometry Plane trigonometry and its applica- 
(Wiliett) loganthms - Three ""its; second semester. 

4. Algebra. A rapid review of elementary algebra; math- 
™m£ induction equivalent equations, surds and complex 
numbers theory of quadratic equations, simultaneous quad- 
ratic and higher equations, ratio, proportion, variation the 
progressions and other simple series, inequalities, permuta- 
tions and combinations, the binomial theorem for any ex- 
ponent, limits and infinite series, determinants, the theory of 
equations; application of algebra to analytic geometry prob- 
lems. Three units, first semester, (Willett); two units sec- 
ond semester, (Arnold). ' 

ti ;L^ dV f anCed T ri g°. no metry. This course is planned par- 
ticularly for engineering students, and. includes a review of 
plane trigonometry. Prerequisite, course 3 or entrance trig- 
onometry. Two units; first semester. (Arnold.) 

thl'^lt 11 ^ y n3ly u C geometry. The analytic geometry of 
I hrfpf £ C ' th 1 C u Cle ' and the conic actions, including 

IrZl dlscusS!on °. f the general equation of the second de- 
gree and some special examples in higher loci. Three units- 
second semester. (Willett.) w ' 



102 University of Southern California 

1R Flementarv Algebra. This should include the follow- 
in^ suSs The four fundamental operations with em- 
nhasfs olaced on the type-forms in multiplication and divi- 
sion factoring highest common factor, and lowest common 
multiple- fractonl" and fractional equations; simultaneous 
equations of the first degree; the binomial theorem for a 
positive integral exponent; evolution the tbeow. Qt« 
ponents; radicals; quadratic equations; and the i £™«°"°/_ 
nroblems involving the various classes of equations. Jim 
phas!s™houid be placed on factoring and on the solution of 
equations. One unit. 

1Q Advanced Algebra. This should include the following 
subject! d Mathematical induction; the proo and the use of 
the remainder and the factor theorems; evolution, including 
the extraction of any root of algebraic polynomials, and also 
of arithmetic numbers; the theory of exponents; complex 
numbers radicals and irrational equations; the theory of 
nnadratic equations; simultaneous quadratics; inequalities; 
ratio proportion and variation; arithmetic, geometric and 

£n nt r&SSlSSSi Uphic representation; the theory 
of enuations Emphasis should be placed on the solution 01 
equXns by factoring, and on the demonstration of laws and 
principles. One unit. 

20. Plane Geometry. This includes the usual theorems 
and problems of elementary plane geometry.. An 'mportant 
part of the work should be the solution of original exercises, 
including problems in mensuration. (1 unit.; 

21 Trigonometry and Solid Geometry. The development 
of he general formulas of elementary plane tngonomery 
Ae thefry of logarithms and the use of logarithmic tables 

(Arnold.) ^^ DIV ision and graduate courses 

ma Integral Calculus. The general principles of the in- 
teg a 8 i cSSL; developed, and the usual applications ^ade 
to centers of gravity, to moments of inertia, and especially 
to geometry. Three units; second semester. Arnold.) 

1U Analytical Mechanics. The mathematical treatment 
of statics kinematics, and dynamics. Prerequisite, courses 7 
and 108 Three units; first semester; two units, second sem- 
ester. (Lawrence.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 103 

nnV 2 Vl, DeSC !;i. PtiVeAstr ? nomy - A general course, requiring 
thiVsAwr f t Jf mat,c f s ° courses 1-3. Open to students in 

SteVoKiSK ° f C °" ege C ° UrSe - Tw ° Units; first sem " 

fin 2 n°=' Adivanced Analytic Geometry and Differential Equa- 
»!?h • T a analyt, . c geometry is a continuation of course 6 
and includes a brief course in analytic geometry of three 
dimensions. The course in differential equations U element 
tary and open to students who have taken course 108 T*o 
units; both semesters. (Arnold.) 

Hri^d^SSS ^° UrSe - L ? cture / on teaching mathema- 
rom tt JZ/J } T g ( * TtVleW - ° f elementary mathematics 
schools T tt f P r epanng teachers for secondary 

,.nit«. h I S !° ry ° A math ematics is also studied. Two 

units; both semesters. (Arnold.) 

Major Work. Thirty semester units. 
Minor Work. Ten units, including 7 and 108. 
lOrm.fotTlO. 1,630116 "' Recommendation - Courses 1-7, 
MILITARY SCIENCE 

LIPIT C T p L m°amI L w I ; EWTS M - KOEHLER . Commanding Officer 
LIEUTENANT EDWARD L. SYKONDS, Assistant to Commanding 

at T the R TInivl e ti ? ffi A erS -, T , r ri n nfo Corps was first established 

established by o'rde ffro^th! W^D^r ZIT^A n'mbe" 
of changes are under contemplation by the War Deoart 
ment, but have not yet been definitely settled Ue part- 

reSedl tomLT*' P ty a " lo ^ er division stude "ts are 
required to meet the military requirement of five hours oer 
week, three in strictly military drill, and two in physical 
training under the Department of Physical Education T 

Uniforms are provided at Government expense and men 
ml wifl luo^ thC tW ° yCarS ° f advancedMili ary Train- 

abou7$ 2 00 n P r r eCeiV ^ C0I S m ^ ta ^ !i. of rations amounting to 
about !f,1^00 per month. R. O. T. C. students are also e1iaihl„ 

comiSn r o°f ffi th e ;f tralning Cam P S '- a « d uPon ar t e he al suc e c f f i 
comp etion of the four year course in Military Training are 

Olcei Cor C p s mmiSS10n aS SeC ° nd Lie «^ntsin the Referve 



104 University of Southern California 

I Military Science and Tactics. Company and Battalion 
drill Required to 'all Freshman and Sophomore men Three 
Jours pe? week%ne unit; throughout the year. (Koehler 

and Symonds.) 

? Phvsical Training. (See Physical Education 1.) Gym- 

the year. (LaPorte.) 

10. Personal Hygiene. (See General Biology 1.) Two 
units; first semester. (Ulrey.) 

11. Sanitary Science. (See General Biology 2.) . Two 
units; second semester. (Ulrey.) 

16 First Aid to the Injured (See Physical Education 16.) 
Two units; second semester. (LaPorte.) 

MUSIC 

Students who take harmony and theory or advanced in- 
stSmeS or vocal work in the College of Mujc may be 

II ~a r^ilAo-p rred t for the same, but the creait snaii u 
noTse £e e ef«t r e«»?me»ter unit, .and will be g.ven o„ 
upon the recommendation of the Dean of the College 
Music. 

ORATORY 

ELIZABETH YODER, Professor 
GERTRUDE COMSTOCK, EVA M. SMITH, Assistant Professors 

1. Fundamentals of Common Reading; feggft^ 

Limited to twenty-two. 

S Public Speaking. Consideration of the various forms 

entation "re required. Two units; throughout the year. 
101 Art of Interpretation. A study of the art principle* 

(Prerequisite course 1.) 
units; second semester. 



The College of Liberal Arts 105 

200. Interpretation. Lectures on technique of the speak- 
ing voice and interpretation of literature; oral practice on 
selections from masterpieces. Two units; second semester 
(Open only to candidates for teacher's certificates.) 

toward the A^dcgree" "*** ^ *' *™ """^ mj be co ^d 

ORIENTAL STUDIES AND COMPARATIVE 
LITERATURE 

JAMES MAIN DIXON, JOHN HEDLEY, J. G. HILL, 

ROY MALCOLM, Professors 

K. J. INUI, Lecturer in Japanese Sociology 

S. SAKAI, Instructor in the Japanese Language 

1. Japanese History and Civilization. Early Japan. Japan 
as the pupil of Korea and China. Influence of Buddhism 
I he rise of feudalism and of the Shogunate. The century of 
foreign intercourse. The later centuries of Tokugawa isola- 
tion and centralization. The Mejii era. Problems of today 
lwo units; first semester. (Dixon.) 

2. Chinese History and Civilization. The successive dy- 
nasties of the gre?.t empire. Foreign relations during the 
last few centuries. Founding of the republic. Problems of 
today. Two units; first semester. (Hedley.) 

3. Philippine History and Civilization. The conquest of 
the islands in the sixteenth century; intercourse with China 
and Japan in early times; the Spanish occupation; the Amer- 
ican teacher at work; the industrial future of the islands 
lwo units; second semester. (Dixon.) 

.5. Japanese Civilization and Immigration. The first sem- 
ester will be devoted to the study of the political, social, 
religious and educational evolution of Japan, the introduction 
or Western civilization, industrial development and present 
industrial problems. In the second semester an examination 
oi immigration problems arising from the meeting of two 
civi hzations on the Pacific coast will be made from various 
angles, psychological, economic, political, legal and racial 
I he question of Americanization will receive special atten- 
tion. Two hours; throughout the year. (Inui.) 

6. The Japanese Colloquial. Chinese ideographs and Jap- 
anese syllabaries. Romaji transliteration. Grammar of the 
spoken language, with exercises. Two units; second semes- 
ter. (Sakai.) 

7. The Chinese Mandarin Language. One unit; first sem- 
ester. (Hedley.) 

8. The Japanese Language . A study of Elementary Jap- 
anese leading to business Japanese. (Inui.) 



106 University of Southern California 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100 Oriental Philosophies and Religions. (Philosophy 
and Psychology 146.) Two units; throughout the year. 
(Dixon.) 

Durino- the first semester the philosophical systems, par- 
ticularly^! Hindustan, will be studied. In the second semes- 
ter attention will be devoted to the religions of Asia and the 
intellectual problems that confront the Christian missionary 
and educator. 

102 Japanese Immigration. A study of the problems re- 
sulting from the meeting of two civilizations on the Pacmc 
Coast. Two units; summer session, 1919. (Inui.) 

103 The Industry Development of Japan. History of 
the lacquer, porcelain and other industries. Development of 
the northern island under American instruction. Osaka as 
a trade center. Banking methods. Problems in the newly 
acquired possessions. One unit; second semester (Dixon.) 

104 The Political Development of Japan. Mediaeval feu- 
dalism; Tokugawa beaurecratic methods; modern Imperial- 
ism. Extra-territoriality until 1898. Two units. (Dixon.) 

105. The Political Institutions of China. Two units; sec- 
ond semester. (Hedley.) 

106. International Law. (Political Science 100.) Two 
units; throughout the year. (Malcom.) 

107 The Wisdom Literature and Poetry of Israel. (Re- 
ligious Education 100.) Two units; first semester. (Hill.) 

108. The Ruling Ideas of the Bible. (Religious Education 
12.) Two units; throughout the year. (Hill.) 

109 The Mesianic Hope. Its appearance in Mithraism 
and other Oriental religions; its development and fulfilment. 
(Religious Education 112.) Two units; second semester. 
(Hill.) 

110 Persian Literature and Persian Themes in English 
Literature. The "Rubaiyat" of Omar Khayyam; Firdausis 
"Shah-Nameh;" Arnold's "Sohrab and Rustum. Two units. 
(Dixon.) 

111 Sixteenth Century India. Arrival of the Portuguese 
in Southern India. Calicut and Goa. Careers of Vaaco , da 
Gama and Albuquerque. Camoens' great epic, 1 he Lusiads. 
The Mohammadan empire of Babar and his successors 
Characters and ideals of Akbar. Tennyson s Akbar s 
Dream." Two units. (Dixon.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 107 

112. The Founding of British Rule in India. Careers and 
policies of Lord Chve, Warren Hastings, Wellesley, Bentinck 
and Dalhousie. Two units. (Dixon.) 

113. Kipling's India. Bombay, Simla, Peshawar, Lahore 
Calcutta and other localities, with their literary traditions 
Two units. (Dixon.) 

114. Problems of American Government in the Philippines. 

Education; finance; agriculture; commerce. Development of 
representative institutions. Two units. (Dixon.) 

116 Racial Psychology and Ethnology. See Religious 
Education 144. Two units; throughout the year. (Hill.) 

117. American and European Diplomacy in the Far East 

An account of American and European expansion in the Far 
Last and their diplomatic relations with the Orient An 
emphasis will be laid upon Japanese-American relations 
lwo hours; first semester. (Inui.) 

118. Contemporary Far-Eastern Politics. European and 
American interests in the Far East. Balance of power, 
spheres of influence, the so-called open-door question, China 
in revolution rise of Japan and their participation in the 
world war. The Siberian situation. The Far East and the 
world peace, lwo hours; second semester. (Inui.) 

119. Technique of Trans-Pacific Trade. A study of the 
commercial geography of the Far East, her industrial devel- 
opment and possibilities. Her commercial relations with 
America and the technique of trans-Pacific trade, covering 
such topics as treaties of commerce and navigation, patent 
and copyrights; trade routes and shipping; banks and credit 
institutions; customs service and warehouse system This 
course is intended for those who expect to enter into mer- 
cantile business, secretarial work, customs or consular 
service. Two hours; throughout the year. (Inui.) 

Major Work. Thirty semester units, to be accompanied 
or preceded by the following courses: Religious Education 1, 
2 and 21. History 117, and Sociology 103. 

Minor Work. Ten semester units. 

PHILOSOPHY 

RALPH TYLER FLEWELLING, JOHN G. HILL, FESTUS E 

OWEN, JAMES M. DIXON, Professors 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Elementary Logic. A study of the inductive and de- 
ductive aspects of reasoning, with application to practical 
problems. It is the aim of this course to stress the vital 
connection between logic and the practical problems of every- 
day lite, to tram the student in critical habits of thought 



108 University of Southern California 

and to oive him a good basis for further philosophical study. 
While Psychology 1 is recommended as a preliminary, it is 
not required. Three units; first semester. (Owen.) 

2. Ethics. This course is based upon the text of Dewey 
and Tufts' "Ethics," with collateral study of Mills Utili- 
tarianism" Kant's "Metaphysics of Ethics," and Spencer s 
''Data of' Ethics " The general nature of moral conduct is 
sSded? the evolution of S the moral problem from primitive 
life to the present is traced, a comparative study of current 
ethical theories is attempted, and some application of the 
3 of these studies is made, to present problems on- 
dividual and social life. Two units; first semester. (Hill.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100 History of Philosophy. The leading systems of 
thought from the time of the early Greeks until the present. 
Three unfcs; throughout the year. Open to Sophomores. 
(Flewelling.) 

102 Theory of Thought and Knowledge. A consideration 
of the nature origin and validity of knowledge, critical and 
constructive. Three units; first semester. (Flewelling.) 

103 Metaphysics. Treats of the main problems of phil- 
osophy, the theory of being, reality, self, the world, God, 
and the problem of evil. Three units; second semester. 
(Flewelling.) 

110. Personalism. A study of personality, as the founda- 
tion of perception and thought, and the .ground ^ of being 
with special reference to the system of Borden barker 
Bowne Two units; first semester. (Flewelling.) 

111 Personalism and the Problems of Philosophy. The 
relation o ^personalism to other philosophies, ancient and 
modern. Presupposes course 110. Two units; second semes- 
ter. (Flewelling.) 

120 Theism and the Philosophy of Religion. A careful 
examination™ the leading theories offered in explanation of 
the ultimate nature of reality. A clear philosophy of religion 

s sought by a sympathetic study of the light which recent 
ci net shecls upon the problems , of nature mar .and mind 
The texts used are Iverach and Bowne. Prerequisites, mil 
osophy 1. Two units; second semester. 

121 Philosophy of the Christian Religion. An attempt to 
understand the genius of Christianity by a searching study of 
th J teaching of Jesus as found in the original sources See 
Religious Education 110. Two units; first semester. (Hill.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 109 

130. The Philosophy of Henri Bergson. The text used is 
Creative Evolution/' This course seeks to understand the 
new philosophy of life— "vital impetus.'' Two units; first 
semester. Not offered, 1917-18. 

140. Oriental Philosophers and Religions. Early Baby- 
Ionian and Persian philosophical thought, Hindu speculation 
the forest philosophers of India, Buddhist philosophers 
Mahomedan philosophers. The Ethics and intellectual activ- 
ities of China, Shintoism and Bushido, Zen and other sects 
Two units; throughout the year. (Dixon.) 

141. Philosophy of Education. (See Education 110-11.) 

142. Aesthetics. (See Education 107.) (Stowell.) 

150. Philosophical Movements in Literature. Studies in 
the Greek philosophies of life and their reappearance in the 
literature of different periods. Lectures, readings and themes 
Iwo units; throughout the year. (Flewelling.) 

151. Modern Philosophical Tendencies. A study of the 
rise and development of modern philosophy. Lectures as- 
signed readings and themes. For advanced students Two 
units; throughout the year. (Flewelling.) 

Major Work. Thirty semester units. 

Minor Work. Ten semester units. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

WM. RALPH LA PORTE, Professor 

EDNA AGNES COCKS, Associate Professor 

DEAN CROMWELL, Director of Competitive Athletics 

CHESTER H. BOWERS, M. D., Medical Examiner (Men) 

MURIEL D. CASS, M. D., Medical Examiner (Women) 

LAURA CRITTENDEN SWARTZ, Instructor in Swimming and 

Outdoor Sports 

ESTHER GRUA, GLADYS CORYELL, LESLIE STEVENS, Assistants 

Aims of the Department 

1 To correct physical defects; encourage equal develop- 
ment of mind and body; conserve and promote vigorous 
health; provide relaxation from mental strain. 

2. To train physical educators, instructors, play leaders 
and recreation directors for service in educational institu- 
tions, clubs, and playgrounds. 

V 3 M T r A ain ^ r w le ^ de / S and P h y si cal directors for the 
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 



1 1 University of Southern California 

Physical Training Requirement 

All Freshmen and Sophomores are required to spend a 
minimum of two hours per week in some form of Gymnas- 
tics or Athletics, the form to be determined by examinations, 
efficiency tests, and consultation with the instructors. . 

Credit is given for this work at the rate of one unit per 

semester. ,'«'•■ a ~~~„a 

All students are urged to exceed the minimum, and spend 
as much time in vigorous outdoor physical exercise as their 
other duties will permit. . 

Where medical examinations disclose serious delects, stu- 
dents are not permitted to take the general work, but are 
given special exercise suited to their needs. 
Uniforms 

Women will consult the women's director before securing 
their gymnasium and athletic suits. m 

Men's suits (consisting of white track suit, supporter, and 
tennis shoes) can be secured at the University Book btore. 
Practical 

1 General Gymnastics and Massed Athletics. Combining 
corrective, educational, hygienic, and recreational elements 
The work will be varied, and will be divided between the 
gymnasium and the athletic field. Postural and. corrective 
setting-up exercises, apparatus, folk and gymnatic dancing, 
group games, massed athletics, organized athletics: hand- 
ball, volley-ball, cage-ball, hockey, tennis, P^yg^und base- 
ball track and field, basketball, soccer, Rugby ; and American 
football, swimming, etc. Required of a Freshmen and 
Sophomores. Two hours per week, one unit; throughout the 
year. 

2 Advanced Gymnastics. Intended for students desiring 
to specialize in indoor work. Advanced apparatus, tumbling, 
boxing, wrestling, fencing. Two hours per week, one unit; 
throughout the year. 

3 Corrective Gymnastics. Special instruction and train- 
ing given to students whose condition prevents their par- 
tition in the regular work Required of all Freshmen 
and Sophomores unfitted to take course 1. lwo hours per 
week, one unit; throughout the year. 

Theoretical 

Note— All of the following theory courses are open to both men and 
women They may not be used to satisfy the four-umt requirement in 
Physical Education. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

10. Personal Hygiene. The course deals with the pre- 
servation and improvement of the health, care of the body, 
etc. Two units; first semester. 



The College of Liberal Arts 1 1 1 

(a) Men. (See General Biology 1.) (Ulrey.) 

(b) Women. (Cocks.) 

i }h i Sa . ni r taf y Science. Public and private sanitation as re- 
lated to infectious diseases, care of foods, water supply and 
sewage, public and private buildings, health supervision. 
Iwo units; second semester. 

(a) Men. (See General Biology 2.) (Ulrey.) 

(b) Women. (Cocks.) 

, 12. Physiology. A general study of the activities of liv- 
ing organisms, with special attention given to the physiology 
of the human body Three units, second semester. (See 
Zoology 2.) (Ulrey.) K 

15. Principles of Physical Education. The underlying 
principles of organization, leadership, and administration of 
Physical Training work. Division of activities. Organisa- 
tion of boys and girls' clubs, Boy Scout Troops, Campfire 
Groups, etc. Special attention given to general health prob- 
jfe eu S er ycs, the need of reforms in Physical Education, 
history of the movement, comparison of systems. An intro- 
duction to other courses in the department. Three units- 
first semester. (LaPorte.) ' 

f.in^nJ 1 "!^ t0 th ^ In [ ured - Emergency treatment of 
H 1 "' 8 U '■ wo " nds > hemorrhage, sunstroke, electric 

shock fits sprains, dislocations, fractures, poisons, etc.; the 
use of bandages, methods of carrying the wounded recovery 
Porte r °) Wning persons ' Two units ; se cond semester. (La- 

20. Playground and Gymnastic Games. A study and 
analysis of games for the Playground and Gymnasium The 
work consists of lectures on the theory of games readings 
and reports, together with the practical conduct of' games fn 
the Gymnasium. Two units; second semester. (Cocks.) 

22. Elementary Folk Dancing for Schools and Play- 
grounds. A practical study of folk dances arranged to meet 
the needs of schools and playgrounds. The dances are of 
such a nature as to supply a natural outlet for the spon- 
iTeTL WT * m P ulses °: the child. Special attention 
(Cocks ) S ° f P^sentation. Two units; first semester. 

23. Advanced Folk Dancing and Aesthetic Technique. 

Advanced folk and national dances, intended for secondary 
school purposes, festivals, and pageants. Aesthetic tech- 
nique, theory, and practice of rhythmic movements Pre- 

.£«!£ TcocL 2 ) 2 or its equivalent - Two units; second 



1 1 2 University of Southern California 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

102. Recreation and Religion. Recreation as a prime ele- 
ment in religious education. Methods of organizing the 
home and church in a common plan of character training 
through play. Constructive play programs for the city ana 
ruraT church including the organization of clubs and various 
octal and 'recreational activities. . A general recreation 
training course for religious and social workers. Two units, 
second semester. (LaPorfe.) 

104 Anatomy. Study and dissection of various types of 
lower animals/with collateral reading inhuman anatomy 
Three units; second semester. (See Zoology 107.) (Kitten 
house.) 

106 *Physical Education Methods for Elementary 
Schools. A course designed primarily for ^ Preparing o 
teach Physical Education in the public schools. The work 
consists of practical training in handling classes in marching 
actics maz P e running, graded exercises, and I popular games 
suitable for the schoolroom, playground, and gymnasium. 
Each of he Elementary grades is taken up in turn with the 
proper adaptation of story plays, rhythmic games folk 
dances graded exercises, and graded games. Sample les- 
sons are taught under the direct supervision of the in- 
structor and practice teaching in regular classes provided. 
Prerequisite, Course 15. Two units; first semester. (La- 
Porte.) 

107 *p hys ical Education Methods for Secondary Schools. 

Sample lessons and practice teaching as above. Two units, 
second semester. (LaPorte.) 

mo Theory of Play. A study of the nature of the child, 
the nature o? play, and the function of play; Pleasurable 
elements in game/; criteria of the value of p ^ims and 
spirit in the conduct of play; age and sex differences in play. 
Two units; first semester. (LaPorte.) 

110. Playground Administration. History of the Play- 
ground movement; construction and equipmen of a play- 
ground; organization and management of activities care and 
use of apparatus; government and discipline, storytelling 

Supervisor of Physical Education. 



The College of Liberal Arts 113 

and other special activities. Prerequisite, course 109 Prac- 
tice teaching on Municipal and School playgrounds for those 
desiring certificates. Two units; second semester. (LaPorte.) 

111. Physiology of Exercise. A study of the direct ef- 
fect ot exercise on health, considering movements, heat 
combustion, fatigue, breathlessness, exhaustion, overwork 
training, etc. Two units; first semester. (LaPorte.) 

112. Kinesiology. A brief study of the anatomy of the 
mprSo ? rgan % ™ th fP? cial reference to joint and muscular 
mechanism. The relation of various sets of movements to 
muscular development. Two units; first semester. (Cocks.) 

115. Anthropometry and Physical Examinations. A studv 
ot physical characteristics and their influence on the indi- 
l^A 9 /! 1 ^ 1 de ^ ect . s ; s im Ple tests for abnormalities; 
methods of taking physical measurements, and testing heart 
lungs ears, eyes, etc. Prescription of exercise. Two units : 
second semester. (LaPorte.) ' 

120 Massage arid Orthopedic Gymnastics. A study of 
the physiologic and therapeutic effects of massage; its appli- 
S to various disorders of the muscles, tendons, and 
Irt^A a u A S ° f correctin S improper posture, uneven and 
rounded shoulders, curvature of the spine. Two units; sec- 
ond semester. (Cocks.) 

inl^Vh PHy f ^ Edl ? cati ™? Seminar. An advanced course 
Wc ■ h y« cal _Education Majors. Discussion of vital prob- 
lems in the Physical Education field. Reviews and critiques 
Wr;t U f rrCn fl Physic ^ 1 Ed uption books and magazine articles. 
Written theses. One unit; throughout the year. (LaPorte.) 

Major Work. Thirty semester units, in addition to Phys- 
ical Education 1, 2, 4 and 15. The course must include 10 
personal Hygiene; 11, Sanitary Science; 12, Physiology 15' 
Principles and History of Physical Education; 16, First Aid ! 
f ' i ei ?u n ^ ary in?°l k Dancin ^ 104, Anatomy; 106, Elemen- 
ta**y Methods; 107 ' Secon <tery Methods; 109, Theory of Play 
110, Playground Administration; and four units selected from 
courses 111, 112, 115, 120. Majors will also take Chemistry 
is and (if they do not present entrance credits in High 
School Chemistry and Physics) Chemistry 1 and Physics 1. 
Ihey will take at least six units in Education, covering the 
History of Education and general principles of teaching and 
administration. They will also take sufficient practice work 
in Physical Education to insure proficiency in all forms of 
gymnastics and athletics. 

Minor Work. Ten semester units, to be arranged. 

Playground Certificate. A certificate of proficiency in 
Playground work (not a teacher's certificate), will be given 
to those students completing satisfactorily the following 



1 J 4 University of Southern California 

courts: U 2,4, .0, U 1* » » KJ, ^^."^^ 

S^jiErtt£!S SUSS «"e E*M 

or School playgrounds. 

to a special certificate to teach r ^f; ' , Educa tion and 
Public Schools. In addition to Phys eg. «J ucwt 

cured in the following manner: 

S££ffiK foTotaTf o^ fi^ C ni| in Physifal Education 
and the supplementary subjects combined. 

j.«, A full maior in Physical Education, covering 

£3l.ai- "»»">«" «~ **« """- 

PHYSICS 

ARTHUR W. NYE, J. H. MONTGOMERY, Professors 

J. F. WILSON, Associate Professor 

LOREN T. CLARK, Assistant Professor 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

* *-~,^oi TTUmentarv Physics. A course intended for 

&,S&.^TSS 5 «oS«T4. Fo„ units; .hrou^h- 
out the year. 

2. Mechanics. Lectures and recitations. Three units, 
first semester. . 

3 Mechanics. Laboratory course. . Three hours during 
one afternoon of each week. One unit, first semester. 

4. Heat. Lectures and recitations. Two units; second 
semester. 



The College of Liberal Arts ] \ 5 

a(W„^?S Lab ° r atory course. Three hours during one 
afternoon of each week. One unit; second semester 

< P !L;f leCtriC i ty - Lectures and recitations. Three units- 
second semester. " units, 

7. Electricity. Laboratory course. Three hours during 
one afternoon of each week. One unit; second semesfer g 

semes'' LeCt " res and recitations. Two units; first 
afXrn^ 2°» SK^^ *2fc**« ™ 

sheets prepared by the department \rl %t k * °I y c ° urses > instruction 
perimental work per ormed bv the st, 1 1 - baS - S • ° r the work ' The ^x- 
Millikan's "Mechanics Mofecular Phv sic f Ta^ £ at desc "bed in 
"Laboratory Physics." Courses 3 and fm u & . , Heat . and Miller's 

units; second semester. ^requisites, Fhysics 6. Two 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

ment of current and electromotive force, insulation teTts hvT 

hereof Pe 7 eabilit ^ : ^sts, the calibration o Tnstruments" 

periods per w n ee e k Se Tw the V™™™* ° f induction > ^ sS 
penoas per week. Two units; either semester. 

106. Heat. Study of state changes, kinetic theory radia- 
nt s'mesteT' meth ° dS ° f ex P erimenta ' work;^' unt; 

Two'unSrnrsI SgSZT* T ° aCC ° mpa " y cour « e 106 " 
oS, 2SSd s?m eTter riCa Tw o Pt ^ts firSt """^ PhySkal 
Tr-unhs'rboTh 1 ^SSH^ T ° aCC ° mPany C0UrSe m 
consLr^n^f ^"^ P rinci P les - th eory of vowel sounds, 
T wT r u U „r; n fi? s f t^e U m C e:!en StrUn,entS ' *^^ acoustics.' 



H6 University of Southern California 

7 Electricity Laboratory course. Three ' hours <Ju r jng 

one afeniooTof each week. One out; second semester 

8. Light. Lectures and recitations. Two mutt; first 

"rtiht Laboratory course. Three hours during one 
afternoon of each week One unit; first semester. 

Note-Courses 2 to 9, ^^^^^^^^^ 

»<*£ *w£tt*£r EEx?z risers* 

'sheets prepared by the department are the teior ^ ^ sc 

S^ffiSTfe^^^^-^ received - The same ,s 

true of Courses 7 and 9. # . - 

units; second semester. 

17 Physical Measurements. Laboratory course to accom- 
pany 16. One unit; second semester. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

105 . Electrical Measurements g A laboratory cousin 
which the theory and methods of e ^ electro resistance 
tion are taken up, including the dete ™ at J° measure- 

by various methods ga ^-^ffo ^Insulation tests, hys- 
ment of current am if.\ ec \ r °™°"^ calibration of instruments, 

ri a of^^^ etc - six 

periods per week. Two units; either semester. 

106 Heat. Study of state Ganges kinetic theory radia- 
tion and exact methods of experimental work. Two units. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
K „V HSO.COM, JiMB S -.JMJK". »WB«. .. «-»». 

TOHN HEDLEY, K. S. INUI, Lecturers 

HARRY J. McCLEAN, Instructor 

GENEVA BROWN, Assistant 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

,. Introduction » Politic.! Sdott- The ^oncj^" 
cf political science; theories of. J » , ' £« „,. Lec . 

STS&'SKS.^^ 32 lh ' " ^h0 " , thc ye "' 

"■Lucy Low A su.* of J-jM* 
r„ls ,h Ve&»id\SX.o' *r S »S. who^thoogh no. 



The College of Liberal Arts ] ] J 

ill™£ g *l ent « r ,, the \ e ^i profession, desire to have' an 
yeir ( ta MTcka n W ) ledge ° f Uw ' Tw ° h ° Urs; th -«ghout the 

Ori;nufsludie? 3 ndit£0nS " ** Phili PP in - (Dixon.) See 

4. Japan's Foreign Relations. A study of Japan's inter 
course with China and the West, particularly withX Unked 
States. Two units; first semester. (Inui.) See Course 102 

UPPER DIVISION AND GRADUATE COURSES 

100. International Relations. The nature sources and 
prrnc.p es of International Law; the influence of Christian 
civilization upon rules. Special attention is given to The 
Hague Conferences of 1899 and 1907. Lectures, readings and 
study of cases. Two units; throughout the year (Mafcom ) 

stuXsinThe'L^fM ^™ 01611 * 8 in Eur °P e - A se »es of 
studies in the field of the comparison of the different methods 

Eurone T?\ '" aCtUal P racti ce in the various states of 
thr^ P u f Lectures . ladings and reports. Two units- 
throughout year. (Lowrey.) ts ' 

102. Japanese Civilization and Immigration. First sem- 
ester will be devoted to .the study of the political sodTl 
religious and educational evolution of Japan^introduct on of 
Western civilization, industrial development and present in- 
dustrial problems. In the second semester an examination 
of immigration problems arising from the meeting of two 
c.v. hzat.ons on the Pacific Coas? will be made from various 
angles, psychological, economic, political, legal and racia? 
The question of Americanization will receive* spedal atten- 
tion. Two hours; throughout the year. (Inui.) 

103. The Industrial Development of Japan. Historv of 
the cotton, silk, and other industries. Developmen of the 
northern island under American instruction. Osaka as a 
trade center. Banking methods. Problems in the newly 
acquired possessions. One unit; second semester. (dK.) 

104. European Expansion in Asia with special reference 
to French and Dutch methods of Colonization. Two u ts 
throughout the year. (Lowrey.) See History 117 ' 

105. The Political Institutions of China. Two units- sec- 
ond semester. (Hedley.) units, sec 

***% Jr* Governmen . t ?f England, Colonial Government 
thlu^oSTeTea? T^olS.) ^ ^^ Tw ° «S 

(uZ, u it%tz r ^:To\. Three units; first ™- 



1 1 8 University of Southern California 

108 Political Institutions of the American Colonies. A 

ports Two units; first semester. (Malcom.) 

lOga Political Institutions under the Constitution. A 

second semester. (Malcom.) 

in . Sixteenth Century India Arrival of the Portuguese 

in Southern India. Calicut a " d , n 9°t reat epic The Lusiads. 
Gama and Albuquerque. Camoens great epi in char _ 

The Muhammadan empire of Babar and * ls suc , « Akbar ' s 
acter and political ideals of Akbar. ^nnysons 
Dream." Two units; Summer session, 1917. (Dixon.) 

119 The Founding of British Rule in India. Careers and 
po^s^QivT ^stings, Wellesley Dalhousie and Ben- 
tinck Two units; second semester. (Dixon. ) 

115. Latin-American Govemm ent A -ries of inve^ga- 

tions into the workings of . St a% a "d$™ 1C Y e ctures, read- 
in the leading Latin-American Republics ^ecun , 
ings and reports. Two units; throughout the year. 

Two hours; first semester, (inui.) 

117. Contemporary Far Extern ™^*?fi%l£ 
American interests in the ^^/^tdolr question^China 
spheres of. influence he so-called open ^° A 
in revolution rise of Japan and p ^ ^ the 

X!dpe a a r ce. T TU^ursVsecond semester d-) 

200. American Government A ^J^^'^n- 
and national government in a ^ uSr 'of^ernment. 
tion given to the P rac " ca '. f inves tigations. Three units; 

ss^x^a^ sA- H f;; y of 2i : hich 

Major Work. Thirty semester units ;*££*$**£ 
must be in upper division courses Jj 1 c ^f e n S with the ap- 

ments for the major, courses "ay J cho «, the 

proval of the department, from other heiasp ^ 

fields of History and Eco "° m * C H S n *ses are given, from time 
iftiml S?A3RSS a w d h d oTrren g a|ed in the actual 
administration of government. 



The College of Liberal Arts \ 19 

^SS g&. *£,£"»* ™^ includ <" - least four 
PSYCHOLOGY 

FESTUS E. OWEN, Professor 

tures, tSra^SSf da^om^" T^^ LeC " 
mental elementary LpeVimental woS m °" s . tratlons ; s «Pple- 
semester. (Owenf) penmentaI w <>rk. Three units; first 

psychology. Thre & e units (Owen ) PnnClpIeS ° f S eneral 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

fcSi&^g^'SJ"*^ ,A„ investigation of 
se m -tr° d (c5le^ 

d£d P opie s nal T y he m a e i n m al is he to in H ? ' ^ 4°°™ ^ ^ 
ciples o?abnoSal m"„El Jro^'an^^ 1 ^ P , Hn - 
w,th e the normal psychie ac/vitiel.^T^^s S^met" 

tion 145. (Hill ) religion. See Religious Educa- 

a XoZlt gufdanC , e ' XrtiSS * -^ - fe 
neaitft. two units; second semester. (Owen.) 

105. Genetic Psychology. A study of the genesis and evo 
lution of conscious processes and behavior. Types of anfmal 
on h d a sTm r ;sTer al ( a 5 d wrn d ) iVidUal *"*»"**■ T^umts^c- 

ca£ lSSf!l?Sg U %S- Eth » 01 ^. (Religious edu- 
° r teachln S- Two units; first semester. (Owen.)* 



,20 University of Southern California. 

U0. Educational Psychology The > general P-^holof of 
the learning processes wUh agphcat om o V™* of he 

SSSoSf ^r^^ntal^a^ents, moral education. 
Two units; second semester. (Owen.) 

111. Psychology of the Wan .^^g^^JX 

great war. The German »«^5£ J 8 ' y J^SSfogical prob- 
E»££S8^ Two^nS first 'semester. (Owen. 

112 . Applied Psychology .in j^j?J^SS^ 

the Teacher ?f ^ological analys.s^^ . b d 

both general and specihe wnn p . u and motlv ation; 

upon clinical studies • P roblerns °* b Q uild ing; mental hygiene 
the exceptional & M >.:&"?^ A „. teacher fatigue; pupil 
problems of both pupil and ^f^' l fl teacher t0 

fatigue; adjustment proMems of teacher P^ ^^ 
parent, teacher to teacher. 
(Owen.) _ , 

™S„aF% C nS'fnd P c , o n n C S , c, i .e <^» Two «„■.*; 

first semester. (Owen.) 

So^r Thin, oni.s,. to inc.nn, Lo E ic, «,,„ unit, 

and History of Philosophy, six units. 

Minor work: Ten units, exclusive of course l. 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

TOHN G HILL, J. H. MONTGOMERY, Professors 
J G JrOMLEY OXNAM, Assistant Professor 
JOHN HEDLEY, Lecturer 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. The Pentatouoh a.* Other Historic^ ^^.^Su 
Testament. The origin, history »»f » o °' h C y OS T°th. H.bt.ws 

te S8SEF6 s-r™ ;.t £&*•»££« 

units; first semester. (Hill.) 

2 . Th. Prophetic »d Chro«d % B«^ of *j0.d T ? u 

SWffSBWJflK So»Te d c.o.« o. the Unite, 



The College of Liberal Arts 121 

S« ° m -ii t0 k the i e !? d ° f ° Id Testa ™nt times. The greatest 
stre SS w j, be , d upon the gtu prophet! their 

unique place and power, their relation to state and Church 
their d,stinctlve messages and permanent contribudon to the 
h.story of religion. Two units; second semester. (Hill) 

enHre T RfhH^l e fi a M Li r teratUr ^ £ Surve y course covering the 
entire B blical field from the literary point of view The 
great epics, lyrics, dramas, biographies; essays are studied 

Z V V,C ^u t0 6XaCt knowIe ^ and correct interpretation 
of them The necessary historical background is 7t eluded 
Two units; first semester. (Not given 1919-'20.) CU,ded ' 

hrL X ff ^i 1 ' 8 f°u al In / tituti ons. The evolution of the -He- 
brew family, tribe and state, including a study of Semith- 
ongms The course is designed to give the student know 
edge of the customs of the Semitic peoples? in order to un- 
derstand better the references to them in the Scriptures Laws 
and the ia |f'- b ° 0d /7 enge ' SacHfice ' resident aliens are no'ed 

carefun' To/lated T emOCr > tlC idealS ° f the ° ld Testament 
caretully collated. Two units; second semester. (Hill.) 

5. Social Application of Biblical Principles. The origin 
and development of Hebrew moral principles an intend 
study of moral codes of the Old Testament he teachfn of 
the prophets and the principles of Jesus. The tes& o 

eligouTHfT e Vh n e n° de t rn , SOda !'- W"***, ASM 
religious lite. l he practical application of the social dp 

ofTodav t T B ', le ^ ^ Church a "d allied reHgious lorces" 
ot today. Two hours; first semester. (Oxnam.) 

10. The Apostolic Age of the New Testament This 
course , s a careful survey of the Apostolic ChuTch of the 

S,£ i Ur T y '; tS on ? m ' its stral ^ e s " cc «s, its baneful con 
flicts with Judaism, its brutal persecutions by Paganism and 
its new life ,n the dying Empire; also a comparison tf the 

mole"? insp a L t on aUl T Peter '-/ am , eS ' a " d J ° h "> -Toflhdr 
moae oi inspiration. Two units; first semester. (Hill.) 

11. The Gospel History and Literature of the New T«t a 

oMe,„, A n tU - d . y ° f thC Hfe ' teachin ^ s ' work, and rignificance" 
of Jesus Christ as portrayed in the Four Gospels and 1, ,1„ 
agamst the historic background of modern scholarship Spe- 
cial emphasis is laid upon the living authority of Tesus and 
the ruling ideas of the Sermon on The Mount in sharo con 
SSZJrtl^i Pagan reHgi ° US ^^ TwolgTecrd" 

a} 2 \ ThC . R V ling Ideas of the Bi We- A study of the rise 
?n^ 1 XhTbld 8t a°nTNe nd VF?*™ of the esLntiaUeac£ 
cJP«^ e ^j^^ T 2SS.^|g.» ** Piston- 



122 University of Southern California 

second semester. (Oxnam.) 

21 The Genesis of Missions. A study of the nature um- 
ve'rsaHt^an? purpose of religion, and a con, parison o Chr.s- 
tianity with the non-C ^^ f e hg^ons. the P.^ 
Christianity throughout the Graew Roman ^^^ the 

cial attention given to *e difficulties w missionary moye . 
early church; followed by * purvey Northern Europe. 

ments which resulted in .Ju « . first semes ter. 
Lectures, reports, and readings. 
(Not given 1918-'19.) 

22. The ModernS^i^SoieSth: 
Christianity since the R efo t™ tlo n ^ from the time of the 
missionary movements of Protest an ism iro ' orga niza- 

Pi6tiStS f ZiS%Tr^AlicSi^£% its "world-wide 
£& teXt by as a signme y nts and paper. Two units; second 
semester. (Not given 1918- 19.) 

23. Missions in the *^™%*^^^&l 

The Evolution of China. A study ot A n fhe missionary prob- 
social and religious viewpoints ,, and of J J«<» ^ of 
lems, methods ^d "suits, (b) The New J P and & 

the rapid rise of Japan °f°* *^ems of Christian mis- 
survey of 1 the history and ■%»£ *%*%$ of the Christian 
sions. (c) The Racine ^f-"" Pacmc Island groups. Two 

America. ' (a) The Awauening u missions, their prob- 

tory of the Jdian peoples of C "m^ ^ 

lems and work, W A siuuy u physical and racial 

in the world today, (c) A study °* ™| y pny 

problems of pagan P e °P les ; .^ot^ America and Mexico. 

races of the Americas .Spanish fonto*™* missions. 

#£%£ ^nrs^st^tNoTgiven 1918-'19.) 

25. Preparation for *«g*»^J^J£%Z 
SSSSSS tt ld stud^fh| Reparation needed. Two 
units; second semester. (Gilhland.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 123 

30. Church History. Given in Maclay College of Theol 
ogy. Two units. (Douglas.) ^"c b c or ineoi- 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Israel's Wisdom Literature a« ~a j 

3£ SS 52SE ~» - s- ■fisE-w 

units; first semester. (Hill.) inree 

as the final expression and fulfillment of this hone is mSe/ 
Two un.ts; throughout the year (Not given 19&&) (Hill ) 

of Theolo™ T ? tam h ent Exegesis. Given in Maclay College 
ot theology. Two hours; throughout the year. (Healy.) 

Jesus' ISf 1 and f hkal T « achi »S» of the Prophets and. of 

referencfro th,T *"' ? *^ Ay $ iht P^phetic writers with 
reterence to their social and ethical ideals, special problems 

throughout the year. (Hill.) ^^-20.) Two hours; 

erature T A* ^ °* Revel . at . ion and Other Apocalytic Lit- 

2 1 j2ffS5SX b r«hTSfe,1f. h .£SS T has i? S 

first semester. (Hill.) testament. Two hours; 

A "^ Th f ?? istIe to the He brews and the Catholic Eoistles 

A study of this group of New Testament books as reads' 
doTto c. S th n e r P N P T Se ' C r te » ts - teachings, and g'entra !*£& 
Not ll°en h m9- ; 20) (Hi/lT' TW ° h ° UrS; SeCond ««*«■ 



124 University of Southern California 

120 Relieious Pedagogy. A course designed to fit the stu- 
dent fo ffi Bible classes in Sunday Schools -teacher 
draining Curses 8 etc. The teacher, hU work • quahficat.ons 
and preparation; the teacher's approach to the student, etc. 
Two units; first semester. (Montgomery.) 

121 The Modern Organization of the Church. Tjie Sun- 
day School Young People's Societies, various types of church 
orLn?zat°on; duties of various officers, committees, etc. A 
course designed to fit for more efficient lay service in the 
church. Two units; second semester. (Montgomery.) 

130 The Early English Bible. The Gospels and Psalms in 
West' Saxon For description see announcement of the Col- 
Uge of Theology. Two units; throughout the year. (Dixon.) 

140. Charities. See Sociology 104. Two units; second 
semester. 

141. Social Ethics. See Sociology. Two units; through- 
out the year. 

142. The Social Message of the Gospel. The , moral basis 
r,fTw social Question; Christ's estimate of life, the social 
fdeafs of the Kingdom. Various social _ institutions are ex- 
tmed tosee if tley conform to the Kingdom ideal. The 
lines of co-operat on and leadership of the churcn are mm 
cated Two "nits; second semester. (Montgomery. 

144. Racial Psychology and . Ethnology. A st «Jf ^ 
Races- their antiquity, distribution, classification, T el ^ 
Svels mental traits, divergent development, as seen m their 
ethnic Customs, comparative religions ethics , art » J^J 
literatures, and philosophies. . Invaluab n l\ t ° so t S% 1 e "™ ent 
to do home or foreign missionary work, soc lal sett leme 
work, and educational work in the United States, 
hours; throughout the year. (Hill.) 

145. Psychology of Religion, see Psychology 103. 

146 The Development of Religion. A study of the typical 

religions. Two units; second semester. (Montgomery.; 

GRADUATE COURSES 

?nn The Religious Education Seminar. Discussion of im- 
port *Si^^ reviews, investigation of vanous prob- 
lems. One unit; throughout the year. 

201 Seminar in the Relation of Religion to Social Ques- 
tions SeTso a ciology 201. Two units; throughout the year. 



The College of Liberal Arts 125 

SPECIAL COURSES 

Two Years' Secretarial Course. Designed to fit for secre- 
tarial work in Young Men's and Young Women's Christian 
Associations and similar organizations. This is a course 
leading to a certificate, by taking the other two years and 
satisfying the complete major requirements the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts may be secured. The following courses 
are required: 

Freshman Year: Units. 

Religious Education 1 and 2, (Old Testament) 4 

English 1, (Composition) 5 

General Biology 1 and 2, (Hygiene and Sanitation)....4 

Sociology* 101, (Municipal Problems) (1st Sem.) 3 

Sociology 1, (Introduction to Sociology) 4 

Economics 1, (Principles) 6 

Religious Education 120, (Religious Pedagogy) 2 

Religious Education 121, (Modern Org. of Church) 2 

Physical Education 110, (Playground Admn.) 2 

Physical Education 1 and 4, (Gym. and Ath. 
practice) 

Sophomore Year: 

Religious Education 10 and 11, (New Testament) 4 

Psychology 1, (General Psych.) 3 

Philosophy 2 (Ethics) ; 2 

Philosophy 120, (Theism and Philosophy of 

Religion) 2 

Religious Education 30, (Church History) 4 

Sociology 100, (Social Psychology) or (Psy- 
chology of Religion) 3 

Association Methods (Y. M. C. A. Admstn.) 4 

Association History 2 

Association Book Keeping 2 

Physical Education 102, (Recreation and Religion) 2 
Physical Education 106 and 107, (Phys. Educ 

Methods) 4 

Physical Education 1 and 4, (Gym. and Ath. Prac- 
tice) 

Thesis, (Original Phys. on Relig. Educ. Paper) 

Christian Workers' Course. An elementary and practical 
course designed to meet the growing demands from busy 
church workers, not prepared to pursue a degree course, but 



126 University of Southern California 

S?sfactfry S c^ mP lefion of the following units a certificate 
will be granted: Units 

Early Old Testament (1) 

The Prophets and Prophecy (2) 

Paul and His Epistles (10) ^ 

Christ and the Gospels (11) 

Teacher Training 1 

Recreation and Religion (102) 

Playground Administration (HO) 

j ~- t ■*■ 



Religious Pedagogy (120)- . 

Psychology of Religion (103) .......... 

• Preparation for Mission Fields (25) 

No tuition yM*'**r?*%u"6?^^$™' 
SSEnS eSrcoiditioL^ SJred of applicants 
for this course. 

Major Work. For Bachelor degree, 30 units, at least half 
of which must be in upper divis.on work. 

Minor Work. Ten units, at least four of which must be 
upper division work. 

Work. 

The Bible, Its History and Interpretation. Old Testament, 
4 hours; New Testament, 4 hours. 

History of the Christian Church-4 hours; Christian 
Church, 2 hours; Reformation, 2 hours. 

Missions 4 hours; History of Missions, 2 hours; Prepara- 
tions for Mission Fields, 2 hours. 

Religious Education-6 hours; Religious Pedagogy, 3 hours; 
Religious Psychology, 3 hours. 

Sociology and Social Services-6 hours; General Sociology, 
3 hours; Rural Problems, 3 hours. 

Evangelism and Normal Methods-4 hours; Evangelism, 
2 hours; Teacher Training, 2 hours. 



The College of Liberal Arts 127 

SOCIOLOGY 

EMORY S. BOGARDUS, ROCKWELL D. HUNT, Professors 

GEORGE F. KENNGOTT, Associate 

HARRY J. McCLEAN, Assistant Professor 

ERNEST J. LICKLEY, Lecturer 

SARAH E. BUNDY, Lecturer 

HAZEL C. WILKINSON, FRIEDA MARTENS, RUTH BURNIGHT 

Assistants ' 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Introduction to Sociology. A comprehensive study of 
rZ'rl ? T Wf SS - T th i llustration s drawn continuously from 
concrete historical and current conditions. An introductory 
course giving a survey of the field of sociology. Open pri- 
marily to sophomores; freshmen and juniors admitted. Two 
units throughout the year. (Bogardus.) 

»fiL In ^° f d 1 uction to Sociology. Same as Course 1. Begin- 
ning with the second semester of the academic year. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

coXS; f ^ sentiaIs ° f . Social Psychology. An introductory 
course for upper division and graduate students. Gives the 
psychology approach Discusses the social personality 

imft g a e tinn°V mita - , r e h i™ me ™> fashion ^Ration, custom 
imitation the social psychology of the crowd, of leadership 

sociaT o n ror;« the T n li atUre ° f PU 1 HC ° pini0n ' social conS 
social progress. Three units; first semester. (Bogardus.) 

rel°e{\e^ S tht ntialS °1 S ° dal Ps y chol °gy- Same as course 100, 
repeated the second semester; three units. (Bogardus.) 

102. Principles and Problems of Sociology. An introduc- 
take wfnf for T ma ' ure ^udents who have not been able to 
take Sociology I. Two units; first semester. (Bogardus.) 

103. Americanization and Immigration. A study of the 
n a P fn e l a L. m,gratl ,° n *? - the histor y of the world > of the Eur" 
the nrn?,1^?f ndS °L ,m . mi Sr ation to the United States, of 
!,,«*£♦ facing the immigrant while he is becoming ad- 
justed to a new environment, and of the nature of and need 
for Americanization. Two units; first semester. (Bogardus ) 

104. Americanization and Immigration. Same as Course 
103, given the second semester. (Bogardus.) 

Tt!? 5 ; Chari *! es - r Th , e n . a ture, extent, and causes of poverty 
1? a „7' mZai ° n ° f Cha ' nty work and the supervision of pub-i 
The p1 a r iVate t age u nCleS , , Methods of Prevention of poverty, 
vkinitv Tw' tS C ^ antable institutions in Los Angeles a/d 
vicinity. Two units; first semester. (Kenngott.) 



128 University of Southern California 

mfi Social Insurance. An examination of both the theory 

second semester. (Kenngott.) 
throughout the year. (Hunt.) 

S*2S3?.£3S2 SWro^'M re|rm S* 
Economics 108. Two units; second semester. (Hunt.) 

mo TW Theory of Play. A study of the nature func- 
tion anJ need of play from psychological and socolog.cal 
standpoints. Two units; first semester. (La Porte.) 

110 Playground Administration. History of Ae play- 
ground moment. Organization and management of pg 

r^^SS^^ntopS^^fo^ 

units; second semester. (McClean.) 

;rr u™"rf a. u,,,o» .»< ,* • *.. .-* 

semester. (McClean.) 

^ t fr:LS»i"orpitvS,'Trrnhsr fi rLc,«,. 

melsures. Two units; second semester. (Lickley.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 129 

T iiiL S ° Ci£ ? ?? TVey ?- Tr . ainin S ; n survey methods is given. 

tzd£l Zu , , SUbjCCt iS co " sidered - Social surveys of 

leading field problems are undertaken. The training; mav 

vi c r e V wo°rk OPe T *' ^ t0 P er j" anent P° sitionS in S ™- 
vice work. Two units, second semester. (McClean.) 

lif?rt.I^S. t SO f ! * 0| 7; THe faCtS and condi tions of rural 
school pS^ ( , Movenlen t. the rural church, the rural 
school, rural fraternal organizations, the Grange, the village 
as a soc.al unit rural charity and correction, rural social sur- 
est %SanT n ° f rUml Hfe - TW ° UnhS; firSt Sem " 

of 1 ll'h^u£ CiP ? i f r ° bIems - . A study of the main problems 
ot urban life. Includes special lectures bv leading practical 
experts. Three units; first semester. (Hunt.) pract,cal 

122. Labor Problems. A discussion of the leading prob- 

EcTno'mi s°?02 ng Th en alld r^" 6n / aged in ™™&. £* 
economics WZ. Three units; second semester. (Hunt.) 

124. Japanese Immigration and Civilization. The first 

tional r r ,, Win be d6VOted t0 the Stud ^ of the social educa- 
tional religious economic and political evolution of Japan 

In the a , Ckgr °, Und for understanding the Japanese immigrant 
W*. s . e 9 ond semes er an examination of immigration prob- 

Pacfic Coaft wil?h the T 6 V ng ° f ^° civilizations on The 
+£ f L . oast . wn . be made from various angles. The ques- 
,mu fh Amer ' canizat 'on will receive special attention Two 
units, throughout the year. (Inui.) 

125. Housing Problems. Analysis made of the different 
Etltr & f Causes .of housing evils are studied Dif- 
er P rI ^, S -° f proving housing conditions are consid- 
nnil'- tl I inspections in Los Angeles are made. Two 
units; throughout the year. (Kienle.) 

132. Elementary Law for Social Workers. Designed soe- 
c.fica ly for those students who expect to enter the field of 
soc.al service, and who desire to have some knowledge of the 
law applicable to their work. Text-book, lectures Ld as 
signed readings. Two units; throughout the yea. •. (McClean )" 

134. Educational Sociology. An interpretation of the de- 

fo ce P s m whic h r: dUC t M J SySt T in r " Iation to the social 
lorces which have produced it. A sociological analvsis of 

(Li r cWey P ) r ° mS edUCad ° n - Tw ° u «its1 "rst semester 

A ll 5 '- , Socio l°S ical Aspects of Educational Legislation 
Merest tT'tl """P"**™ °, the fundamental laws of vkai 
social Uent An"' *? mc V* l3 > sch °°l administrators, and 
social agents An extension course throughout the vear- 
two units each semester. (Lickley). Y ' 



130 University of Southern California 

142 The Social Message of the Gpspel. .Attention is jggen 

(Montgomery.) 

S units; throughout the year. (Bogardus.) 

1-70 The Sociological Content of Modern Drama. Lead- 
ing 7 Con?neniT English, and American dra m adeahng w.th 
social problems, such as capital and labor, the J^y,^ 
fencer rS3=. ^JK ^ach sem- 
ester. (Bundy.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

200. History of Sociological Thought ^"Jg* ^J 

logical thought since earl.es : times A e Xf sociologists of 

K n^eXce^^ TW ° UnitS! 

first semester. (Bogardus.) 

201. Contemporary Sociological Thought The contri- 
butions of present-day sociology tea re con de red W| 

tion is given to the writings of Me iding ^ fiction , 

well as to the current social thought in ^ ^ 
and poetry. Two units; second semester, v => '. 

210. Sociology Journal f$Jg™X£*ll^ 

the most important article in current socioio j ^.^ 

^&^%^I-t^IZ^%r. (Bogardus.) 

220. Seminar in Sociology An advanced cours^pr, 
marily for graduates and students who have V 

twenty-five hour-unitso sociology edit, btre 
original research. Critiques or cmrc units 

tions. Designed to meet the n « as fa graduates showing 
Tdeq^te preparation CaTan^a fork in= applied sociology. 
Two units; throughout the year. (Kenngott.) 

300. Advanced Research. Highb ^^-aj-d andUchmcal 
h ^fSleS l€ Course S^ to be arranged. 
(B Malor U Work for Bachelor's Degree: Thirty semester 



units. 



The College of Liberal Arts 131 

Minor Work for Bachelor's Degree: Twelve semester 
units. 

Minor Work for High School Teacher's Recommendation. 

Six semester units of upper division and graduate work. 

w( M ^ nor Work f °r Master's Degree: Six units of graduate 

High School Teacher's Recommendation. An undergradu- 
ate major course followed by at least seven to eleven 
?„ n, i V ^ raduate . wor k in Sociology. The entire course shall 
include: Economics Course 1; and the following courses in 
Sociology; 1, Introduction to Sociology; 100, Social Psychol- 
ogy; 103 Americanization and Immigration; 112, Social Legis- 
?nn I w- I ' Edu c cat . ,0 , nal . Sociology, or an equivalent; and 
w;^ 1 7 ■?! Soc ' ol °S lcal Thought, or 201, Contemporary 
Sociological Thought. * 

•wfc ^° rk /?, r Mas u ter ' s De S r ee- An undergraduate 
major course followed by at least ten units of graduate 
work ,n Sociology and a thesis. The specific courses are the 
same as for the High School Teacher's recommendation 

Sociological Monographs. The results of the best research 
rhe r "StX: n ^ de P artm ,ent of Sociology will be printed in 
the Studies in Sociology," which is a series of monographs 
published by the Southern California Sociological Society 
Eleven monographs have been published to date (March 1,' 

SPANISH 

KATHERINE T. FORRESTER, ROY E. SCHULZ, Professors 
RAFAEL RAMOS, Special Lecturer 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

la. Elementary Spanish. The essentials of Spanish gram- 
mar careful drill in pronunciation, reading, conversation and 
writing Five units; first semester. Three divisions. (Forres- 
ter, Schulz.) 

lb. Elementary Spanish. A continuation of Course la 
tive units; second semester. Three divisions. (Forrester; 

toZT7l% r c ZrTL% v ; a ^i ts of Spanish J a - b may be «*«* 

2. Advanced Spanish. Advanced reading, grammar and 
composition. Three units; first semester. Three divisions 
(Schulz, Forrester.) 

"TVm A n V -"f ? Re f d ^, a £ d Composition. Selections from 

Don Quijote" and "Gil Bias," and the reading of one or 

more novels. Advanced grammar and composition. Three 

units; second semester. Three divisions. (Schulz, Forrester ) 



132 



University) of Southern California 



4. Spanish Conversation. The work is based on text- 
books and magazines. Two units; throughout the year, four 
divisions. (Forrester, -•) 

5. Commercial Spanish. A business vocabulary Mjd a 

(Ramos.) 

UPPER DIVISION AND GRADUATE COURSES 

108 Advanced Composition. The translation of long se- 

ond semester. (Schulz.) 

109. Nineteenth Century Literature. A P^™ 
course in which a special study ^s made o some . chose ^ 

^cc; S ofs e tudy d Two S uni?s!Te g con? 9 seme S te, (Schul,) 

110. Lyric Poetry. A rabid purvey tfJ^jSZ 
SSa^^^^^^SS? Sd will not be 
given in 1919. (- ) 

111. Spanish Prose. A ^(SmS^k 
Danish Prose. Alternates with Course UJ ana wl >, 
|fven in 1920. Two units; second semester. ( ) 

MoHno. Two units; first semester. ( ) 

seme s t er ., (— r- • ) 



The College of Liberal Arts 133 

116. Contemporary Dramatists. Lectures and readings 
trom im portant liv ing dramatists. Two units; second sem- 

, 117. Spanish Syntax. A study of the finer points of Span- 
ish syntax based on Bello-Cuervo. Intended primarily for 
cZ°rl. m <??°7\ st " dents ? nd , a Prerequisite of the Teachers- 
bourse (dM). two units; first semester. (Schulz.) 

118. History of Spanish Literature. A rapid survey of 
Spanish Literature. Required of all major students. Two 
units; second semester. (Schulz.) 

t»ti™ J** Lit t erature . of Mexico. The study and interpre- 
tation of important writers of prose and poetry. Two units- 
second semester. (Ramos.) ' 

PRIMARILY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Smrih I? 3 " 1511 Ball ^ ds - A - study of selections from the 
Spanish Romancer o. Two units; first semester. (— .) 

220. Old Spanish. A study of the development of the 
Spanish language in the earliest periods of its history The 

me U rIa a u e ishe 0f T '^V™ ^f ° f P re P-atory Ladn is a 
prerequisite. Two units, second semester. ( .) 

ArSn wfr ^onetics A study of the conclusions of 
Araujo, Joselyn, Colton and Navarro Tomas, with some con- 
s' mester" ( ° f """-C astilian Spanish. Two unit™ fi°rst 

22 ?' Tu aC r hers ' Course - A study of the methods of pre- 
senting the four-year high-school course in Spanish Three 
units; second semester. (Schulz.) V 

rr?t 2 L Seminar. The work of the Spanish seminar is the 

19 10 1Q?n n ^ St1gatl0n ° f \° me S - eleCted author or P"iod. In 
1919-1920 the chosen author will be Cervantes. Two units- 
throughout the year. ( -.) units, 

see F L^ i r U /^ r ^„ L D t l n pa^ e e r „ i t Can Utmtm a " d Latin Ame »<*" *«tr y 
llVind U8 Tk ' THirty Semester units - deluding courses 108, 

wT T ^ u T u\ seniester ""its exclusive of course 1 a-b, 
tour of which shall be in upper division courses. 

High School Teachers' Recommendation. Thirty semester 
units, including courses 108, 117, 118 and 222. semester 



COURSES IN ENGINEERING 

mmmmmm 

whirVi the student's major work is done, ana, in geucid 
Ihould not be technical subjects in that department. 

ARCHITECTURE 

A four vear general course leading to the degree of B. S. 
in Architecture The course includes the theory and prac- 
tice of aSectural design, the history of architecture, and 
the principles of architectural engineering. 

REQUIRED COURSE IN ARCHITECTURE 

First Year Units. Units. 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

a * S 5 

Mathematics, 4, o..-..------ 6 

Physics, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ° 3 

English, 1 - -.--"-;"■■■£.■ '• ? 

Drawing, 1-Mechamcal Drawing * ■ 

Drawing, 8— Shades and Shadows - 2 

Architecture, 1— Freehand Drawing 2 ^ 

Architecture; 8-Elements of Architecture.... 1 1 

Second Year 

3 3 

Mathematics, 7, 108 j 5 

German or French -- --- 2 2 

A_ rt 4— Drawing from Lite - 2 

Drawing, 6— Descriptive Geometry 

Drawing 9-Architectural Perspective - 

CivTEng. 13-Materials of Construction.... 3 ~~ 

Architecture, 5-History of Architecture 3 3 

Architecture 10-Architectural Drawing 1 I 

Architecture', 15-Elementary Archrtectural ^ 2 

CivifEn 1 g.;"i67;To'8i:Mecnanicslnd"Strength ^ ^ 

of Materials 



The College of Liberal Arts 135 

Third Year 

Units. Units. 

Uvil Eng., 115— Graphic Statics 2 

Civil Eng., 116— Stresses in Steel Structures "3 

Civil Eng., 118— Structural Design 2 

Architecture, 2— Water Color " '"{ 1 

Architecture, 3— Pen and Ink Renderino- " 1 

Architecture, 100— Building Illumination and 

Acoustics 3 

Architecture, 101— Sanitation Z. 2 

Architecture, 106— History of Architecture 3 "3 
Arcnitecture, 116 — Intermediate Architec- 
tural Design 3 3 

Fourth Year 

Art, 9— Clay Modeling 1 

Civil Eng., 118— Structural Design "3 

Civil Eng., 121— Reinforced Concrete 4 "3 

Architecture, 110— Professional Practice 1 1 

Architecture, 102— Heating and Ventilating 2 
Architecture, 117 — Advanced Architectural 

A -Design 6 . 

Architecture, 120— Thesis ZZZZ 1 3 

COURSES IN ARCHITECTURE 

1. Freehand Drawing Drawing from geometrical solids 
m pencil and charcoal. Lectures and class problems on the 
IruT^ ^ d V™ cess ™ of ^eehand drawing. Charcoal and 
wash drawings of architectural ornament from plaster casts 

u£Z m & T P f r V S ° f existin S buildings. Six hours, two 
units; throughout the year. (Weatherhead.) 

2. Water Color. Drawing and rendering of architectural 
Outo C f tS dn in \ at f r ,. color - The principles of color iKS? 

^^t^:^ in water color - Three h °™> °- ^ 

3. Pen and Ink Rendering. Rendering of architectural 
subjects m pen and ink. Three hours, one unit; second sem- 

5. History of Architecture. A course tracing the devel- 
opment of building from the earliest times dowl to the be- 
ginning of the Renaissance. Lectures and sketch problems 
Three units; throughout the year. prooiems. 

8. Elements of Architecture. A study of the elements of 
the. best examples of Classical Architecture, prLt ice in ren 
th™? g f, a " d + , sim P le designing. Three hours, one un£; 
throughout the year. ' 



36 University of Southern California 

10 Architectural Drawing. Architectural lettering, de- 
tailing and tt? preparation of working drawings. Three 
hours!' one unit; throughout the year. (Weatherhead.) 

IS Elementary Design. A series of monthly rendered 

Sing and designing. Two units; throughout the year. 

100 Building Illumination and Acoustics. A course in 
the theory and methods of lighting buildings,. electric lamps 
and oAe/illuminants wiring, etc. The Pnnaples of Arch^- 
tectural acoustics and their application to the designing 
interiors. Three units; first semester. (Nye.) 

101 Sanitation The orinciples of sanitation, tne mein 
odfof SedW Modfn Plumbing »y.tem. and fix- 
tures. Two units; first semester. (Lawrence.) 

102 Heating and Ventilating. The theory »4pn*« 
ofTe-atiSand'ventilating buildings including a study of the 
various modern systems. Two units; first semester 

106 History of Architecture. A continuation of course 
5 tracing the development of architectural forms from he 
Duomo of Florence to the present day. Lectures ana 
problems. Three units; throughout the year^ 

One unit; throughout the year. ^ 1lr6J<? i; 

116. Intermediate Design. A continuation of course 15. 
Three units; throughout the year. < rtr . |fia1 

117 Advanced Design. Extended problems m original 
design. Six units; throughout the year. 
'120. Thesis. An advanced study of some SP<^ 
in architectural designing. One unit, first semester, 
units; second semester. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CHARLES W. LAWRENCE, Professor 
C W COOK, Associate Professor 
FRANK D. AID. A.B., Instructor 
The great industrial development of rec «t yea« >n «very 
part ofthe United States has created a la ^demand to 
trained civil engineers The cou rse m Cml bngmee g 
been made broad in order to meet this demand oyp » 

a sufficient foundation for the wide range of practice now 
included under Civil Engineering. 



The College of Liberal Arts 137 

Very few college students know in what part of this wide 
field their life work will lie. Because of this, and the great 
difficulty of mastering fundamentals during the stress of pro- 
fessional work, it has seemed best to provide a broad uni- 
versity preparation and to defer specialization to the period 
of active employment. 

The course is designed to give a practical as well as a 
theoretical training. Nearly as much time is spent in the 
drawing room, laboratory and field as in the lecture room. 

By consulting the schedule following, if will be seen that 
considerable time is devoted to Mathematics, English, and 
the Sciences. Of the more technical work, Field Engineer- 
ing is given very full treatment in lecture room, office and 
field. 

In the third year Theoretical Mechanics is thoroughly de- 
veloped and forms the basis for the designing and construc- 
tion that occupy the remainder of the course. The import- 
ance of correct methods of thought and practice is con- 
stantly insisted upon. 

A very large amount of important engineering work is 
continually going on in the vicinity of Los Angeles. The 
proximity of harbors, mines, irrigation and water supply 
projects, several transcontinental railroad terminals, and ex- 
tensive electric power plants and railway systems, offers a 
diversity of excellent examples of engineering construction. 
Students in this department, accompanied by instructors, are 
required to inspect much of this work and to present written 
reports on what they have seen. 

REQUIRED COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 
First Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Lab. Class 

Hours. Hours. 

Mathematics, 4 — Algebra 4 

Physics, 2 — Mechanics 3 

Physics, 3 3 

Civil Engineering, 1 — Surveying Theory 2 

Civil Engineering, 2 — Field Work 6 

Drawing, 1 3 

English, 1 "3 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Mathematics, 6 — Analytical Geometry 4 

Physics, 6 — Electricity 3 

Physics, 7 3 

Civil Engineering, 1 2 

Civil Engineering, 2 6 

English, 1 "3 

Drawing, 1 6 



138 



University of Southern California 



Second Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Lab. Class 

Hours. Hours. 

Mathematics, 7— Differential Calculus 3 

Civil Engineering, 13— Materials - * 

Drawing, 4 ° — - 

Physics, 4— Heat * 

Chemistry 2— Qualitative Analysis - o 

Chemistry, 2a ° — ' 

Elective 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Mathematics, 108— Integral Calculus - 3 

Civil Engineering, 3— Advanced Surveying 6 £• 

Physics,. 8— Light l 

Chemistry, 3 - - 

Chemistry, 3a " ~~ 

Elective 

Third Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Civil Eng., 107— Analytical Mechanics 3 

Civil Eng., 108— Strength of Materials -- 2 

Civil Eng., 115— Graphical Statics 3 1 

Civil Eng., 104— R. R. Engineering Theory .. 2 

Civil Eng., 105— R. R. Engineering Practice 6 .... 

Civil Eng., 109— Hydraulics 3 

Elective - - 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Civil Eng., 107 \ 

Civil Eng., 108 \ 

Civil Eng., 116— Stresses » -- ■* 

Civil Eng., 105-106— R. R. Engineering 6 £ 

Civil Eng., 118— Structural Design 6 

Civil Eng., 110-111— Water Supply and Irriga- 
tion 3 

Fourth Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Civil Eng., 121— Reinforced Concrete ~ 3 

Civil Eng., 118— Structural Design o l 

Elect. Eng, 101a : : \ 

Civil Eng., 112— Sanitary Engineering ^ 

Elective 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Civil Eng, 118 6 ' { 

Civil Eng, 121— Reinforced Concrete ° 



The College of Liberal Arts 139 

Lab. Class 

Hours. Hours. 

Civil Eng., 122 — Contracts and Specifications 2 

Civil Eng., 119 — Highway Engineering 2 

Civil Eng., 123 — Engineering Design 3 

Civil Eng., 117 — Eng. Lab 3 

Engineering Seminar 2 

Elective 3 

Note — The elective studies provided for in this schedule are subject 
to the approval of the head of this department. 

COURSES IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Surveying. Recitations and lectures on the theory and* 
practice of plane surveying. The course includes the use and 
care of instruments; methods of procedure and of keeping 
notes for land, city, and mining surveys; instructions in com- 
putation and platting of field notes." Prerequisites, a course 
in plane trigonometry. Two units, throughout the year. 
Text, Breed and Hosmer's "Principles and Practice of Sur- 
verying." Vol. 1. (Cook.) 

2. Surveying Field Work. The practical adjustment of 
surveying instruments; the proper method of keeping clear 
field notes, and the working of field problems with chain, 
tape, level, plane table, transit, compass, etc. The work in 
the drawing room consists of platting the field notes and 
making profiles and maps. Six hours, two units, throughout 
the year, course 1 to be taken concurrently. Text, "Pence 
and Ketchum's Field Manual." (Cook.) 

3a. Higher Surveying. Recitations and lectures on the 
theory and practice of the more advanced surveying prob- 
lems, including hydrographic surveying, and mapping. Pre- 
requisite, courses 1 and 2. Two units; second semester. Text, 
Breed and Hosmer, Vol. II. (Cook.) 

3b. Higher Surveying, Field Work. Topographical sur- 
veys with plane table and stadia, city surveys, mine surveys, 
measurement of base lines and triangulation systems, deter- 
mination of meridian and latitude. Prerequisite, course 1 and 
2. Six hours' field work, two units. (Cook.) 

13. Materials of Construction. A study of the manufac- 
ture and properties of stones, cements, concretes, timber, 
iron, steel, etc., with special attention to the determination 
of the safe working stresses. Three units; first semester. 
Text, Mills' Materials of Construction. (Cook.) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

104. Railroad Engineering. A course including the theory 
of curves, switches, and sidings; the making of reconais- 
sances and preliminary and location surveys; the computation 



|40 University of Southern California 

of earthwork and determination of structures; and the mak- 
ing- of final estimates of cost. Prerequisites, course 1 and I. 
Two units; first semester. Text, "Allen's Railroad Curves 
and Earthwork." (Cook.) 

105 Railroad Engineering, Field and Office Work. Prac- 
tice in laying out curves, making a complete survey for a 
short line of railway, and doing the office work. Course 104 
must be taken concurrently. Six hours, two units, lirst 
semester; six hours, two units, second semester. lext, 
"Allen's Railroad Curves and Earthwork." (Cook.) 

106. Economics of Railroad Location. The fundamental 
principles of economical location, construction and^ better- 
ment surveys; a discussion of. yard and terminal design; the 
study of the permanent right of way in regard to its relation 
to maintenance and operation. Prerequisite course 104. Two 
units; second semester. Text, "Raymonds Railroad Engi- 
neering." (Cook.) 

107 Analytical Mechanics. The mathematical treatment 
of statics, kinematics and dynamics, including the determina- 
tion of center of gravity, moment of inertia, centrifugal force, 
etc Prerequisite, mathematics 7 and 108. Three units, first 
semester; two units, second semester. Text, Hancock s Ap- 
plied Mechanics for Engineers." (Lawrence.) 

108 Strength of Materials. A mathematical course in 
the resistance and elasticity of materials, stresses and strains 
shearing, flexure, beams, columns, and shafts. Course 10/ 
must be taken concurrently. Two units, first semester; three 
units, second semester. Texts, Slocum and Hancock :s 
-Strength of Materials,': and Shepard's "Problems in Strength 
of Materials." (Cook.) 

109 Hydraulics. Hydraulic pressure, strength of pipes, 
flow of liquids through pipes and orifices and over weirs, 
losses of head, flow of water in open channels, dams oi 
masonry and earth, hydraulic motors and machinery. Pre- 
requisite, course 107. Three units, first semester. Text, 
Slocum's Hydraulics." (Lawrence.) 

110 Irrigation Engineering. Diversion, conveyance, and 
application of water for irrigation. Design of reservoirs 
dams and diversion work. One unit; second semester. Text, 
Newell and Murphy's "Irrigation Engineering. 

111 Water Supply. The determination of the quantity 
and quality of supply, water purification and conservation, 
design of a system. Prerequisite, course 109. Two units, 
second semester. Text, Turneaure and Russel's Public Water 
Supplies." (Lawrence.) 

112. Sanitary Engineering. The drainage^ of buildings, 
treatment and disposal of sewage, sewer system for cities 
Prerequisite, course 109. Two units; first semester, lext, 
"Sewerage, Folwell." (Lawrence.) 



The College of Liberal Arts 141 

115. Graphical Statics. The graphical determination of 
the stresses in engineering structures. Course 107 must be 
taken concurrently. Two units; first semester. Lectures 
and drafting. (Lawrence.) 

116. Stresses in Framed Structures and Arches. The ana- 
lytical and graphical methods applied to determining stresses 
in roof and bridge trusses and masonry arches. Prerequisite 
courses 107 and 115. Three units; second semester Text' 
Turneaure's Modern Framed Structures, Vol. 1. (Lawrence.) 

117. Engineering Laboratory. The testing of engineering 
materials. Prerequisite, course 108. Three laboratory hours 
one unit; second semester. Work done at the Osbourn Test- 
ing Laboratory (by special arrangement.) 

118. Structural Design. The theory for and practice of 
making complete designs for steel bridges, roofs and other 
structures. Lectures, drawing, and computing. Prerequi- 
site, courses 108 and 116. One hour lecture, six hours draft- 
ing, three units. Text, "Modern Framed Structures/' Vol 
111. (Lawrence.) 

119. Highway Engineering. Roads and streets of broken 
stone, paved and oiled roads, the location of new roads Two 
units; second semester. Text, "Baker's Roads and Pave- 
ments." (Lawrence.) 

121. Reinforced Concrete. The theory, design, construc- 
tion and estimates of concrete and reinforced concrete struc- 
tures, including buildings, foundations, retaining walls tun- 
nels, culverts, dams. Three hours lecture; three units- 
throughout the year. Text, Hool's "Reinforced Concrete 
Construction," Vol. I and II. (Cook.) 

122. Contracts and Specifications. A synopsis of the law 
of contracts as applied to engineering construction and a 
study of typical contracts and specifications. The course 
includes riparian rights, boundary lines, survey descriptions 
etc Two units; second semester. Text, Tucker's "Contracts 
in Engineering." (Lawrence.) 

123. Advanced Engineering Design. A study of some 
special engineering problem by the student. The subject 
must be approved by the professor in charge of the depart- 
ment of Civil Engineering and by the professor who would 
have immediate direction of the work proposed, not later 
than November 1st of the senior year. It must be com- 
pleted and submitted by June 1st of the same year Three 
units; second semester. (Lawrence.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

218. Structural Engineering. The theory and design of 
continuous girders, swing, cantilever, suspension of metallic 
arch bridges. Two units. Text, "Modern Framed Struc- 
tures, Vol. II. (Lawrence.) 



142 University of Southern California 

221 Advanced Reinforced Concrete. The theory and 
design of reinforced concrete bridges, arches, tunnels and 
chimneys. Two units credit. Text, Hool's "Reinforced Con- 
struction," Vol. III. (Cook.) 

224 Theory and) Method of Least Squares. The applica- 
tion of the laws of errors to the adjustment of observations. 
Two units, one semester. Text, Weld's "Theory of Errors 
and Least Squares." (Lawrence.) 

225. Seminar. A two unit course in the reading and dis- 
cussion of the current engineering literature. 

226. Shipbuilding. A general course in naval architure. 
A study into the theory and practical principles of the design 
of ships Three units, lecture and drafting. Prerequisites, 
courses, 108, 109, 118. 

ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING 

T FAY WILSON, ARTHUR W. NYE, J. H. MONTGOMERY, 

J ' Professors 

The courses in Electrical Engineering are designed to fit 
yonng men to engage in the operation and Production of 
electrical apparatus, and also in the application of electricity 
to the Arts and Sciences. 

During the freshman and sophomore years there is laid a 
broad foundation, consisting of Physics Mechanics, Chemis- 
try Surveying, and Drawing. During the junior and senior 
year ^ special studies in electricity and its application are 
pursued These inyolye the theory of electricity and mag- 
netfsm with application to direct-current machines and meas- 
uring instruments, and alternating-current machinery and ap- 
naratus comprising alternators, synchronous and induction 
'motors; transformers and rotary converters ^Courses > an =also 
given in Electrical Transmission and Distribution, illumina 
tion and Hydraulics. 

The work of the engineering laboratories is co-ordinate 
with that of the lecture and class room, and aims tog a 
practical knowledge of electrical measurements and the hand 
ling of electrical machinery. 

Southern California, in its present state of rapid develop- 
ment, offers exceptional opportunity to the hydraulic and 
electrical engineer. The work of the University is excellently 
supplemented by the large amount of work under construe 
tiom The engineers and superintendents in charge of this 
work have been very courteous in aiding the classes , on the r 
various trips of inspection. The various power and electric 
plants in and about Los Angeles afford e**^ 1 ?* of 'J 60 *™ 
development of high-tension power transmission not sur 



The College of Liberal Arts 143 

passed by those of any other city in the United States. 
Various excursions are made to these plants, which are 
explained in detail by the superintending engineers. 

Mechanical and Electrical Engineering are closely allied, 
and the first two years of the two courses are identical. Dur- 
ing the junior and senior years of the Mechanical Engineer- 
ing course, the development of power by means of the various 
types of heat engines, and the distribution and utilization of 
this power, is studied. The application of power to railway 
marine and automobile work offers opportunity for detailed 
study and Mechanical Engineering, and for the application 
ot the fundamental principles studied during the earlier part 
of the course. 

REQUIRED COURSES IN ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING 

First Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Hours per Week. 
Af .« . /rr , . Class Lab. 

Mathematics (Trigonometry and Algebra) 5 

Chemistry, 2 and 2a 3 ""5 

English I " " 3 

Physics, 2 and 3 (Mechanics) .."...." 3 3 

Drawing I (Mechanical) "'_"_" 3 

Semester credits 18. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Mathematics (Analy., Geometry and Algebra).. 5 

Chemistry, 3 and 3a 3 5 

English I .. " 3 

Physics, 8 and 9 (Light) '""'""'""'. 2 3 

Drawing I (Mechanical) 5 

Semester credits 18. 

Summer— Approved employment, 8 weeks. 

Second Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Mathematics, 7 — Calculus) 3 

Physics, 4 and 5— (Heat) \ ."_" 2 3 

C. E., 1 and 2 — (Surveying) 2 3 

C. E., 13— (Materials) 3 

Drawing, 5— (Machine) ...Z". .... 6 

Economics, History or English 3 

Semester credits, 17. 



144 University of Southern California 

SECOND SEMESTER 



Hours per Week. 
Class. Lab. 

Mathematics, 108— (Calculus) 3 .... 

Physics, 2 and 3— (Electricity) *> * 

C. E, 1 and 2— (Surveying) * j> 

M. E., 1— (Mechanism) 6 jj 

Drawing, 7— (Kinematics) ---- 

Economics, History or English * 

Semester credits, 18. 

Summer— Approved employment, 8 weeks. 

Third Year , 

FIRST SEMESTER 

E. E., 101a and 102a— (Circuits and machinery) 5 6 

M. E., 104— (Design) l 

C. E., 109— (Hydraulics) * 

C. E.. 107-108— (Mechanics) ^ ~- 

C. E., 115— (Graphics) ■ ■ --■- * 

E E. f 106— (Excursions) ( No credit; 

Semester credits, 18. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

E. E., 101b-102b— (Motors) 3 6 

C E., 107-108— (Mechanics) * £ 

C. E., 118— (Structural Design) -- 

Economics— (Accounting) 6 "" 

E. E., 103-(Design) ... - * ^ 

E Ej 106— (Excursions) - W° c reait J 

Semester credits, 18. 

Summer— Approved employment, 8 weeks. 

Fourth Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

E. E., 107— (Transients) *j 

E. E., 105— (Transmission) ----- L ' ~ 

E E 108— (Electrical measurements) ^ £ 

M. E, 101a-102a— (Heat Power Eng.) ----- £ 



Elective* 



E: e Eri06^(Ixcursions)-Z= (No credit) 

Semester credits, 17 or 18. 

^Elective-Subject to the approval of the head of the 
department. 



The College of Liberal Arts 145 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Hours per Week 

E. E,, llO-(Telephones) ClaSS 3 Lab> 

E. E., 109— (Electric Railways) ZZZ 2 

E. E., 112 — (Power plants) ? 

M. E., 112— (Power plants).. 3 

Physics, 112-113— (Illumination) 3 i 

C. E., 122— (Contracts) ,_.___ 2 

E E., 106— (Excursion) "V No cre ditY 

Semester credits, 16. . creait ^ 

Total credits required for graduation, 140. 

REQUIRED COURSES IN MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING 

First and second years same as in Electrical Engineering. 
Third Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

M. E., 101a-102a— (Heat Power Engineering). 5 6 

M. E., 104 — (Design) 2 

C. E., 107-108— (Mechanics) ZZZZZZZZ 5 

C. E., 115 — (Graphics) '"{ 

C. E., 109— (Hydraulics) 3 J 

M E.-(Excursions) ZlTcNo credit)' 

Semester credits, 18. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

M. E., 101b-102b— (Int. Comb. Engines) 3 6 

M. E., 103 — (Thermo-dynamics) ^ 

C. E., 107-108— (Mechanics) 5 

C. E., 118— (Structural Design) ~"k 

M. E., 107— (Valve gears) ." 3 ° 

ME., 106-(Excursions) (No credit) 

Semester credits, 18. J 

Summer— Approved employment, 8 weeks. 

Fourth Year 

FIRST SEMESTER 

E E 101a-102a— (Circuits and Machinery).. 5 6 

M. E., 105— (Design) yj \ 2 

M. E., 109— (Railway) . 11/ 

M. E, 110— (Marine) '_ \(/ 2 

M E, 108— (Heating and Ventilation)... ""' 2 

Elective* 3 

ME., 106— (Excursions) ZZZZT(No credit")* 

Semester credits, 18. 

*Electives subject to the approval of the head of the 
department. 



146 University of Southern California 

SECOND SEMESTER w AA V 

Hours per Week. 
Class. Lab. 

M E., Ill— (Refrigeration) ..: * 2 

M E., 112— (Power plants) 

E E 112— (Power plants) - 

Economics (?)— (Accounting) 

C. E., 122— (Contracts) 3 

Elective* ---. -. ■■ : \^o credit) 

M. E., 106— (Excursions) v 

Semester credits, 15. 

Credits required for graduation, 140. 

COURSES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1 Wireless Telegraphy. Elementary principles of wire- 
less Kphy Poetical wireless apparatus, .code practice. 
Three units P Physics 6 advised, bnt not required. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

mi a Electrical Circuits and Machinery I. Development 

of^funllSfl faws ^^25 ana 
alternating, currents; resistance "actance p 

requisites, Physics 6 and Calculus. 

mih Electrical Circuits and Machinery II. . Continuation 

f v F 101a dealing particularly with electric motors and 

of E. E., 101a aeaimgp j sem ester, junior. 

k h eTuir a e P d Pl of XtriSTngineering students. Prerequisite, 
E. E., 101a. i p 

109 3 Flctrical Laboratory. Laboratory work for the ex- 

reZ,"r, iunL 10 S",'enior C ' e Re^^d- of dec.ric. ,„d me- 
chanical engineering students. 

102b. Electrical Laboratory. Continuation of EElOJa. 
Two credits. Second semester, junior. Required ot electn 
cal engineering students. 

students. Prerequisite E. E., lUla. 



The College of Liberal Arts 147 

104. Electrical Machine Design II. Design of alternating 
current dynamos and transformers. Credit depends on work 
done. *irst or second semester, senior. Not required for 
graduation. Prerequisite, E. E., 103. 

105. Electric Power Transmission. Electrical and me- 
chanical problems incident to the design, construction and 
operation of electric power transmission lines. Two credits 
First semester, senior. Required of electrical engineering 
students. Prerequisite, E. E., 101a. 

108 Electrical Measurements. Theory, construction and 
nrtrZLl ^ instru ^ en ts for commercial and exact meas- 
urements. Three credits. First semester, senior. Required 
ol electrical engineering students. Prerequisite, E. E. 101a. 

107. Transients. Non-harmonic waves and their analysis- 
propagation of waves in space and over wires: dielectric and 
inductive storage of energy: transient phenomena incident 
to load adjustment's, shortcircuits, surges, etc. Three credits 
hirst semester, senior. Required of electrical engineering 
students. Prerequisite, E. E., 101a. 

106. Excursions Power houses and manufacturing 
plants in and near Los Angeles are visited. No credit Both 
semesters, junior and senior. Required of electrical engi- 
neering students. 6 

110. Telephones. An elementary course on the theory 
and operation of the telephone, and of telephone exchanges 
Ihree credits. Second semester, senior. Required of elec- 
trical engineering students. Prerequisite, E. E., 107. 

111. Electrical Engineering Mathematics. Application of 
the principles of mathematics to the solution of electrical en- 
gineering problems. Two credits. First semester Not re- 
quired. Prerequisite E. E. 101a and calculus. 

109. Electric Railways. Application of the electric motor 
to railway work: traction mechanics: traction graphics' 
speed-time curves: types of cars and their construction: con- 
trol systems, etc. Two credits; second semester, senior 
Required of electrical engineering students. Prerequisite 
E. E. 101a. 

112 Electrical Engineering of Power Plants. Selection 
installation and operation of the electrical equipment of 
power plants; plant efficiencies, cost of power, etc. Two 
credits,^ second semester, senior. Required of electrical and 
mechanical engineering students. Prerequisite E. E. 101 a. 

113. Theory of Electricity. Advanced mathematical in- 
vestigation of electrical phenomena: conduction in o-ases- 
valve actions Credits depend on quantity and qualfty of 
work done. Elective. 



148 University of Southern California 

COURSES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

and mechanical engineering students. Prerequisite, Physics 
2 and Trigonometry. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

min Heat Power Engineering. Fundamental principles 

First semester, junior or senior. Keqmrea o 
electrical engineering students. Prerequisite, rays 
4, and Calculus. 

101b Internal Combustion Engines . Principles of inter- 
na combusion engines, their construction and o p t 
Three credits; second semester; junior. Quired of Me 
chamcal Engineers. Prerequisite, M. E. 101a. 

102a Mechanical Laboratory. Calibration of steam 

102b Mechanical Laboratory. Continuation of M of 
102a Two credits. Second semester, junior. Requ.red of 
Mechanical Engineering students. 

irw Thermodynamics. Fundamental laws of thermody- 

Prerequisite Physics 4, and Calculus. 

iiu Elementary Machine Design. Stresses in and pro- 

credits; first semester; junior K ^" irea ;° ite Phys i C s 2 and 
Electrical Engineering students. Prerequisite rny 

M. E. 1. 

105. Adyanced Machine Design •. Continuation of M. E 
104. Design of an assigned ™*«$ T ™ d se £$£Tn«*. 
Sequ^d fflanicS^S students. Prerequisites, 
M. E. 104, C. E. 107 and C. E. 108. 



The College of Liberal Arts 149 

zi«r I?a'™r S T h~™ g ^' ra « h >"™^ Bilgram „d 

R«,u, ; ^^X\ a ^7L^i4 e ri,rtSeS; 

Engineering students. Prerequisite, ME. 103. ^ ecIlanical 

109 Railway Mechanical Engineerine 1 nmffln ,;, „ 
struction and operation; air brfke systems a„T her me" 

firs a t n ^f eq f UI r t ent ° f raiIwayS - °'^ and one-na°f credi s 
first half of first semester; senior ReauireH nf M» u ■ i 

Engineering students. Prerequisite, ME. 101a Mechamcal 

credits; second half of P first semeste? seSnr T* ^"J 1 ^ 

Mechanical Engineering stLlZ^krZTsite .^TVl 

111. Refrigeration. Fundamental principles of coolino- 

systems, and their application to ice-making and cold stora "e & 

an^ Electrical Engineering students. Prerequisite! ME 

MINING AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

LAIRD J. STABLER, L. S. WEATHERBY, 
GILBERT E. BAILEY, Professors 

The University is at present offering two years of the 
course m Mining and Chemical Engineering. The work as 

of mai P gl T th °! OUgh trainin ? in ^e fundamenteUubj^cts 
°n P r,T= f at ' CS ' c . hem 'stry, physics, drawing, and the ele- 
ments of engineering. The foundation laid in the two years 
prepares the student to enter any of the good minhJ col 
leges and complete the work of the Junior and Senior wars 
specializing in Mining and Metallurgy Y ' 



150 University of Southern California 

Students who ^■*«^-^££ e ^I^ 
University may, by satisfying the V" hfDepartment of 
Arts, .select '^Jtnrin our es for which credit 
^ir^L^A^^i^^^^ as majors in 
Chemistry. 

Courses in Mining or Chemical Engineering 
Freshman Year 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 
Units. Units. 

3 4 

English, 1 ----- 4 4 

Mathematics, 4, o - - 5 5 

Chemistry, 2, 2a, 3, 3a 2 2 

Civil Engineering, }-y":"V-r"^""r< 2 2 

Civil Engineering, 2 (Field Work) - * 2 

Drawing, 1 - 

in Arts. 

Sophomore Year 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 
Units. Units. 

Mathematics, 7, 108-Calculus 3 3 

Geology, 3— Ores and Metals £ 

Drawing, 4 -- 5 6 

Physics, 2, 3, 6, 7 - 4 4 

Chemistry, 4, 108 3 

Civil Engineering, 3 - 

INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 

Students who have completed the two W^*™* ££ 
lined above may continue *™™*Jg t ™ Thecomplction 
eral Arts and the ^^^°^^^^ of Science, 
of this curriculum leads to the degree 01 * f h t 

be taken. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Liberal Arts of the Univerm'tv „f q„ ,u 
California s situated in In* AnJ university of Southern 

S ^KliS-Ss^riHir'-VC-l-'- 
EQUIPMENT 

^ov£t^^^ Libraries co„, 

tained at the Colleges of li™ Ph l* llbr anes being main- 
Arts, Dentistry and Theology" PhyS ' Clans and Surgeons, Fine 

ov^^OO^utfis Satfd in £?*«■ A h rts ,', -Gaining 
University. It contains also th. n "^ £ ulldin « of the 
Library o y f over T:o a \^u a srnd th volu D rnes placed tf^TT^ 

I«'»dS h each SO y n ea? e t o rg n 1 e I et C t°h Chr r ^ 'new tlJml.s 
departments 7 Cet the dem ands of the various 

search work P ° Vlde ample space for study and re- 

recommendation of their ^f^ t Fa culty and, upon 

gaged in advanced worl ^ professors > to students en- 

to **> P b 5S7aJ.d?ro^ fi 7 1 ?0 d S r8 9.S)p e ^ ek %°T ^ \ M " 

8:00 A. M. to 3:30 P M M - ; °" Sat urdays from 

The Los Angeles Public Library of over Kn nnn i 
a most valuable supplement to tL f,^iv ,0 2° volumes is 
University Library P and i accessible to »U fr* by the 
University Library is a depotftory o the Public"? i^ Th 5 
books as needed are brought from rL r> urr-, Llbra ry and 
use of the students TheVesourees of * n ^ bra - ry for the 
are supplemented by an inter Hhrarvln University library 
colleges in the State Y a " System witb other 

in T m?ne^Xra C n°d nta g^ o a V X whTcr ° f Specime " s 

during the past vear? h! *Z' T- h ^ been accumulated 



j 52 University of Southern California 

daily work of the classes in geology MWJ "toe^ogg^Th. 
museum contains the collection purchased tr on r> p 
Bowers; and those ^"^f^ofLickfnson These private 

iC Airwholnate specimens to this department will receive 
due acknowledgment on the labels. 

Civil Engineering Laboratory for Testing Ma^ n* ta. For 
the purpose of conducting series of : **g ™ ^Lgements 
of materials used in engineering construction ar R | d 

have been made for the use of the aPP^us o h . Strong 

Osborn Testing Laboratories located in t comp l e te 

building. The eaniP-ent of this laborato^ . 

as any on th /^ acinc =°f,7 j com pression machine, a cold 

tests of materials. . v 

Physical and Electrical Engineenng £^^ oc ™ 

Departments of £*«» £ d r i f S ^ Mafn^Buildin! and the 
eleven rooms on the first tloor and eq d ex- 

north wing. Ihese nave oec p the 

clusively for the department and are wel su . g 

poses for which they are used Amp^e ele mentary 

provided and equipped for "W^f electrical measure- 

%L«^te£?$^&™" l:a » i high frequency 

"SESSS^ and I-^g^^SaS °n f u^ e ol 
quality. The .equipment inMechamcs mem tus by 

excellent precision P iec f s n ^ y .J a /[^t interferometer, spectro- 
Pye of Cambridge, England in i Light , inte ^ KoW 

meters, prisms, ^. adin «Vm e nt fs «5eS& complete. Special 
In Electricity the eqmpment is especiaay P ostoffic e 

mention may be made °*^3 er "y Leeds and North- 
boxes, slidewire bridges, potentiometer by Thomp _ 

rup portable f^^f^ll^etS, standards of self- 
son dynamometer, ^"^ |^ ter and variable condensers, 
induction, sechometer, P erme a™«, te £ an indicating 

There is also an unusually complete assortm induding . 

meters for both direct and alternating cu .^ ^ 

voltmeters, ammeters, and ^tmeter so Wag ner in- 

mos tly made by Weston; also ™ney hot J ^ 
duction, Hoyt torsion head ; Ayrton and re , ^> s 
General Electric magnetic vane and b. ^ q and 

The dynamo room is equipped w^« There is a 

fS^t^^^^ : ^' &atM with spe " 



The College of Liberal Arts 153 

macW^f 'T Til™ 8 phaSe and voIta S e connections. This 
machine has, also, three extra rotors so that it may be run as 

r«£a? Ctl0 \ motor Wlt , h squirrel-cage rotor, with an external 
resistance rotor, or with an internal resistance rotor. It may 
aiso be run as a synchronous motor. 

kJ he / ,5 ~ K T Westinghouse double current generator may 
be used as a 1, 2, or 3-phase alternator, or as a 125-volt DC 
generator, or as a rotary converter. 

r.i n i add w? n , t0 these mach 'nes there are also, a 1.5 Kw. 
Crocker-Wheeler generator, a 1.5-Kw. Edison D. C. genera- 

house" 11 ! TnlTu Westin S house D; C. generator, w'es ng- 
Electric 1 and 5 -h° rse P° wer induction motors, and Generll 
■full , d horsepower induction motors, the latter 
with the phases wound in different colors and brought out to 
a termmal board so that various connections may be made 

conTrolwff^ rlleostats > water-rheostats, transformers, 
controllers, and compensators are provided. Circuits run to 
the electric measurements room and lecture room, and one 
of the motor generator sets is arranged for operation in the 
lecture room for demonstration purposes. A stereopticon 
with slides showing modern electric installations is provided 
H^nt , pho f to t meter u r00m is e( l ui PPed with a Schmidt and 
Haensch station-photometer of the Lummer-Brodhun con- 
trast type, with accessories; and also with a Sharp-Millar 

fnw^f- pho ?T ete u r ' Standard lam P s ' color scr een, five oo 
integrating globe photometer, etc. 

The wireless and high frequency equipment contains one 
2-Kw high-voltage transformer, a high-capacity osciUation 
transformer, a high potential condenser (th?ee units) and a 
break-key for sending. The unit receiving set cons Its of six 
mineral detectors, two Fleming audions, a loosTcouoled ex 
penmental detector a tuning transformer, and °wo latest 
type condensers. There are also wave meters hot wire me 
ters, various ypes of spark gaps, several types of tunin- Tnd 
resonance coils, several sources of high f^ncy^n^ 

In the machine shop are provided tools for repair work 
and training ,n shop practice. These include a twelve-inch 
engine lathe, a speed lathe, a drill press, taps, dies and drflls 
and bench tools for wood and metal work. ' 

n „ Th l„ Lit,rar y contains a large number of reference books 
General y phy P s e ics al "*>"* m ^^'^ E ^neering and 

n P I h nr^ l0g - iCal Equipment. The entire second floor of the 
loXal lSn W, f ng -° ?. mai " huildin S is devoted to the bio- 
wi^h tUf nn/ 1 ? T^ lectu / e .r°om. The four laboratories 
with the r 110 feet of desks facing immediately to the north, 
are so planned that each student has abundant light. Each 
student is supplied with two drawers and a miscroscope 



154 University of Southern California 

locker each with Craig combination-locks Specifically, the 
equipment of the four laboratories is as follows. 

The Zoological Laboratory, 34x35 feet contains • *°rt£.even 
single desks and a large demonstration taWeJx^ 1 te t 
drawers and cupboards on each side tor ff kee ping live 
atory is provided with an aquaru m a dnp ^^^ 
specimens glass ™'*^^J%*££a microscope, BA 
etc. Each student is furnished a compou materials 

2 or BB2, dissecting instruments, and the necessaiy 
for dissection and study. . . , t of m i C roscope has 

A Bausch and Lomb P^^S? Scherer in memory 
been presented to the f^ ar ^ r % M ^ ch ererT The instru- 
of her husband I, .the lat Luthe s ^/^ and acceS sories 

^oifowr^ss 

micrometer and other accessories. 

The Botanical ^W^^lSZ^&vl 
contains forty-eight single desks wj h^ araw ation 

and Craig combmation-lpcks for each a !arge lies; 

table; cases for herban.um specimens, books y^ 

^^J^SSS^^a^ for study are 

^gAT^t Physiology the la^Jj^ 

• well equipped. This equipment cons ^^^f^ ™ d P es the 

types of apparatus ^ .experimental work, a na 1{ di . 

mer's-Sas Siffi Ap^ratuf, l^l^ ^TiS^ 

apparatus for working out th *. P?™ e s l;® roved microscopes 
For research work m Botany the : latest i™P r °^ a f em pera- 
with oil-immers.on objectives eamera lucma ided . 

ture stage, micrometers and .other accessories ^ mag 

^it^^^**^ to Botanical 



literature. 



literature. . . 90 ** 

Th« L.bor.tory for «W« » «!& A?Jd 

a^pSr»/" d cie C ~ f ,, ;« g a S b ,nd s »PP. i es. A,. 



The College of Liberal Arts 155 

the necessary materials, apparatus and instruments, including 
BBS Bausch and Lomb microscopes, are furnished the stu- 
dent. For Physiology the laboratory is supplied with the 
reagents and apparatus necessary for successful laboratory 
work, such as microscope, haemocytometer, dissecting in- 
struments, etc. A complete set of the Harvard Physiological 
apparatus has been added. For Histology and Embryology 
the student is supplied with BB-8 microscope and has the 
use of the Minot automatic rotary microtome, Bausch and 
Lomb s automatic laboratory microtome, and all reagents 
necessary to carry on successful work. 

The Biological Research Laboratory, 15x17 feet, adjoins the 
omce of the department, which is also 15x17 feet. The equip- 
ment of these rooms is such as adapts them to advanced work 
along # special lines. The best microscopes of German and 
p!?^ a ? m T a T ke are available, including Bausch and Lomb, 
u~ • eiSS ' Wlth achroma tic- and a set of apo-chromatic 
objectives with compensating eye-pieces. Other microscopes 
or the Leitz and Spencer types, imbedding baths, contrifuge, 
camera, and numerous microscope accessories and instru- 
ments are provided. 

The Biological Lecture Room is 32x36 feet with raised 
seats It has a seating capacity of about two hundred and is 
provided with skylight and fitted with screens for darkening 
to adapt it to the use of the electric projection apparatus and 
stereopticon that form part of the equipment. *The lecture 
desk, which is fitted with drawers and cupboards, can be 
adjusted instantly for gas or water for demonstration pur- 
poses, this room, as well as all others, is well supplied with 
electric lights. 

The wide halls have been provided with glass cases in 
which are placed a large collection of birds, mollusks, and 
alcoholic specimens for demonstration and study. The col- 
lection of mollusks is very complete, representing over eigh- 
teen thousand specimens. to 

The Marine Biological Station of the University of South- 
ern California is housed in the aquarium and auditorium 
buildings at Venice. The research laboratory has places for 
eight investigators, and the combined laboratory and lecture 
room for the summer course in marine biology will accom- 
modate forty students. In the large aquarium room there 
are forty aquaria with sides of plate glass and one large cen- 
tral concrete basin. A library and a reference collection of 
the local fauna and flora are being established. 

The Venice pier and breakwater have been made a biologi- 
cal reservation by a special act of the Venice city trustees, 
rtere are colonies of abalones and other animals brought 
trom a distance for study and experimentation. One and one- 



1 56 University of Southern California 

ments. , immediate field of investigation 

In the Pacific Ocean the immediate ^m gan 

embraces the Santa Bar b«a Islands ext enai * hun _ 

Clemente, eighty miles to he south, to ban ^ g^ ^^ ^ 
dred and thirty miles to the west uem n miles 

shallow, reaching the one hundred tatno hundred 

directly seaward ^ the southwest a deptn s;x 

and fifty fathoms about five miles ^yo B bara Is i ands , 
from Venice, somewhat to the w est ois* ma 
lies an oval basin twenty miles longed ^ten m ^ 

having a depth of «ght hundred a naj y and q{ ^ 

fc to b"e2?S. bStn? foWe^ploration of these waters. 
The Chemical Laboratories . occng ; the ^J^",*! 
southern portion. of the ^mpus^ The laborat ^ ^ 

eral and qualitative chemistry .will accom t f tudents; 

dred students;. that for ^ n *f™ e £e™udlnts. The labor- 
that for organic chemistry t^r^h modern laboratory 
atories are thoroughly equipped wi th m oa {n & 

tables, water, gas, apparatus and chemicals tY ^ ^ 
large number of hoods and all of the. c ° n ^ te room , we ll 
ern & laboratory. The : balance .room is a «P« a c balances . 
lighted and equipped with ^ff*" * tity of apparatus 
The storeroom is supplied with a large i quan J £ labora . 
and chemicals of the jbert mate A specif ^ thorQUghl 
tory accommodating twennnv electro-chemistry,, and 

equipped with storage batte " n ^f ar atus for determining 
with combustion and special apparatus to {of ^ 

molecular weight Another ^^^Vwnsists of still, 
vestigations on .oil ^d gas The equipment ^^^ fof 

hydrometers, viscome ers, Atwa ter s Do ^ imeter8> Hem . 

heat determination Jger s patent ^ u ^ & ^ 

^Tp^SSWe'a™^ "wo additional research 
laboratories. . 

The Assay and Metallurgical Laboratory occupies a lar^ 
room in the Chemistry Budding. The ;^qu.pme _ 

rock crushers ore g»" d " s ° r f ic ^ era T he fmnaces are of the 
ing fans, all 4"^"^^ T he equipment includes appar- 

STffi^S? tSf e,e»r"etuo„ /roces.es. The 
laboratory is modern in every detail. 

The Laboratories .for O^fSfiStt £« 
SrSK S5"«- hav, been Canned 



The College of Liberal Arts 157 

rn d th a e r s? n subl^ aS 1° ilUlStr , ate th ,? daily work of the ^sses 
by the Rev PR v^ 8 ^ ™ lleCti S ns are those dona ted 
Dkkinsor f knrf 5; ' M ^ S ' ¥ a / y Wri ^ ht ' and Professor 

^lckinson and the one purchased from Dr. Stephen Bowers 

^ C o°rSv n f 0f ° ne h " ndred type soils of the state gives 
opportunity for comparison and study. Laboratory work is 
earned on in making relief maps to scale to firate thl 
geology, physiography, soils, and mineral industries A 
dentTSon Jf '".Sirt^ ft the P h ^-al analysis and 
era logy, physiography, soils and climate of CaHfomfa The" 

tins L \h ge , oglc fo os an d soil maps of the State- bulle- 
tins on the geology, oil, and mining industries- and mini 
maps, charts, photographs, and lantern slides Y 

ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL TRAINING 

aid the horit ; ,i •*" hygle . nlc Slde Physical training should 
correct deformitv ^ / Unctlons > d f: elo P a symmetrical form 
Tn if. J i I y c as - far as Possible, and afford recreation 
essa v for Ca s P Tf fu " ctlon ^ should a^rd the discipline nee-' 
snnrfs/r self - contr °l. both mental and moral. Athlete 

thr^T aS - Um 3nd AthIetJ c Grounds. The gymnasium the 
three tennis courts, the basketball courts, the incTosed aThletic 

The gymnasium has been fitted with appliances for th* 
proper development of the bodv Thl „!?£ lhe 

baths lockers flf ,rl H p 1 g ot the gT mn asium, with 

cist C °f^?W- e equ . i , pme " t ' * Provided for each form of exer- 
cise Galleries will afford audience room for snecial lZ™ 
nasfc exercises when such are open to X public gy 



158 University of Southern California 

utmost caution is used in the i ^vice giv en n «££ « . g . 

he or she is unfit. athletic contests must 

*££. nSSta^S^SfJ^SaUS before being per- 
mitted to participate. 

DEBATING 

The University provide, oPP°«»»*/» & theS £ 

and prizes totaling $60.00 are °" ere ° testants ra nking high- 
Delta Sigma Rho J^tX^speaking^ These men. together 
est in "sincere and effective speaKing. University 

with others properly q«ahfymg, "P™ 8 ^,. < Triz es.") 
in regular interco legiate debate^ (.bee u fae 

B r en fZ da wmi m S^B wen r six S -cu P s are" presented 
erosity of Mr. wu ! ia jP f ' f thA institution who show ex- 

^r S 1n"fr:XS.r3S« d g Te™r«< *e Univerni., 
NEW ERA FOUNDATION 

tion. . r _ i.:-,* rn time udoii the founda- 

There is to be given from time t .time up }ntroduc . 

tion, lectures treating various timely topi" ^ ^ 

tory series was given February /* / VXnUlism in the Re- 
Wright Leonard, on the subject of Evangelism 
making of the World." 

RELIGIOUS PRIVILEGES 

The moral atmosphere •^ d g^^Sd.ti^2d 

^£$^E*£££S&» are active and 



The College of Liberal Arls 159 

fS/ Ve iD !? dal and reli g ious I'fe. These Associations hold 
Tt 11 Von M gS H° Pen t° all students. Assemblies are held 
at 11.40 on Monday and Friday. Attendance is required of 
all students in the College. In addition to the chapel serv 
ime C0 A rS a t% 0f f PeCml addres .ses are delivered fronftim to 
lm n e ' J 1 s *V dent Player-meeting is held every Thursday at 
/ p. m. lhese privileges constitute a good Christian at- 
mosphere ,n which to lay the foundation of character Stu- 
dents are expected to attend some church each Sabbath 

"he Bible 1S6d t0 j ° in S ° me Sunday dass for the -St of 
th J h / Universit J Methodist Episcopal Church is located near 
the campus and is one of the most prosperous churches *n 
he c,ty. The Baptists and Presbyterians and other denom" 
inations, also have churches in the near vicinity TheTe 
advantages, together with fine public school privileges make 
the University section of the city a very desirable olac^fnr 
the residence of families seeking educatiLal opportunitTes 
HOUSING 

Requirements _ as to the housing of students living away 
from home are in the hands of a special Faculty Committee, 
sidered^ettled C ° mphed wlth before the student may be con- 
THE WOMEN'S HALLS 

^"dertdie management of the Women's Club, dormitories 
are provided for young women, where every home comfort 
and protection is assured to those coming from a distance, 
itl onm;? P os s«ble rates. A cash deposit of ten dollars 
aS PvnUt r . e f lred f ,° r V he . ^servation of a room. Students 
are expected to supply their own bed linen. 

oarSt^o n r l^ d f mS ^° d ,° n0t live at home < that is - with 

™en% Li,! f^ rdlans) ar ? required to live in one of the 
women s halls. Where exceptions are necessary, either from 

nroval JT^* *?" ' d ?™tories or other reasons written ap- 
ruardln »„A% lodgings must, be secured from parents or 
guardian, and filed with the University 

win h? d M nt Vac , at j ng a room befor e the close of the semester 
will be charged for room and board until the end of the 

s'tuTenr' rirf the f vac n h as been filled by an incoming 
student. Therefore, for the benefit of the outgoing student 

e a °rW° f a W 1tentio " ^ withdraw should be^given at the 
earliest possible moment 

AlFstuXnf, t SerV6d at , the Women's Hall on school days. 
All students may secure luncheon at the Universitv Cafeteria 

chaSp f Cam r S ', the i X P ense of which is not Sued n the 

charge for board and room at the Women's Hall 

further inquiries and all applications for rooms should be 

StrtrLo/Angeles. 11 - ^^ H1 ° WeSt wShS^ 



160 University of Southern California 

THE WOMEN'S CLUB 

A society of ladies interested in the welfare of the students 

rff the- student body. The reception room and the girls rest 
ot the stuaenr uuu>. efforts- the women's dormi- 

m Theie»r,bo»ToS S i»nd,,d members, and a meeting is 

ganization. Last year tne ™ f fa Univ ersity and joined 
bXthe a Itate and Nadonal Federations of Women's Clubs. 
^December 1914, an Alumnae Department was formed, 

^of'un & for tfeTomen now taking gradual, .work, and 
of furthering in all possible ways the n*™****^ 
,r P r«itv Only those